The Week: Most Recent Sports Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/sportsMost recent posts.en-usMon, 20 Oct 2014 06:06:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Sports Posts from THE WEEKMon, 20 Oct 2014 06:06:00 -0400Why you should absolutely watch this confounding, wonderful World Serieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270157/why-you-should-absolutely-watch-this-confounding-wonderful-world-serieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270157/why-you-should-absolutely-watch-this-confounding-wonderful-world-series<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63545_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-different-look.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">The pairing of teams in the World Series beginning Tuesday night is both improbable and delightful &mdash; like a foul ball bouncing perfectly into your beer cup. It's not what you expected, but it's time to chug anyway. And you'll be glad you did.</p><p class="p1">The scrappy San Francisco Giants overcame a string of injuries, the decline of some of their best pitchers from the last half decade, their division rival Los Angeles Dodgers' massive payroll, and then, in the National League Championship Series, the terrifying St. Louis Cardinals to take the National League pennant for the third time in five years...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270157/why-you-should-absolutely-watch-this-confounding-wonderful-world-series">More</a>By <a href="/author/michael-brendan-dougherty" ><span class="byline">Michael Brendan Dougherty</span></a>Mon, 20 Oct 2014 06:06:00 -0400The best football stadium food in Americahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268214/the-best-football-stadium-food-in-americahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268214/the-best-football-stadium-food-in-america<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62887_article_main/w/240/h/300/philadelphias-lincoln-financial-field-doesnt-skimp-when-it-comes-to-pizza.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The average football game lasts three hours, ten minutes. Within that span of time, there will be a flurry of penalties and television timeouts, as well as the general halting that's built into the game. It's also a long time to go without eating.</p><p>(<strong>More from <em>Tasting Table</em>: </strong>Fowl play)</p><p>Should you find yourself in the stands of any of these stadiums, tear yourself away the next time your team gets a first down and hightail it to one of these concessions stands, at which big-name chefs have eschewed standard stadium fare for the signature dishes that made them famous.</p><p><strong>FirstEnergy Stadium (Cleveland...</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268214/the-best-football-stadium-food-in-america">More</a>By Jillian KingSun, 19 Oct 2014 12:00:00 -0400How Bill Simmons' unjust suspension exposes America's toxic Football Industrial Complexhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268790/how-bill-simmons-unjust-suspension-exposes-americas-toxic-football-industrial-complexhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268790/how-bill-simmons-unjust-suspension-exposes-americas-toxic-football-industrial-complex<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62990_article_main/w/240/h/300/dont-blame-the-messenger.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">On Wednesday, ESPN suspended Bill Simmons for saying out loud what ESPN's own reporting had already confirmed.</p><p class="p1">The <em>Grantland</em> editor &mdash; who is probably ESPN's most valuable commentator &mdash; called NFL commissioner Roger Goodell a "liar" in an expletive-filled tirade on his popular podcast Monday. Simmons was blasting increasingly implausible NFL claims that Goodell had not seen or been aware of horrifying video of star running back Ray Rice punching his wife in the face before giving the former Baltimore Raven a meager two-game suspension. Indeed, Simmons' broadside against Goodell came...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268790/how-bill-simmons-unjust-suspension-exposes-americas-toxic-football-industrial-complex">More</a>By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>Thu, 25 Sep 2014 13:40:00 -04004 cool tech innovations that could revolutionize sportshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267865/4-cool-tech-innovations-that-could-revolutionize-sportshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267865/4-cool-tech-innovations-that-could-revolutionize-sports<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62571_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Smart basketball court</strong></p><p ><br /><br />(<em>Facebook.com/AKQA</em>)</p><p>Sometimes, the best way to learn something is by combining your own experiences with the experiences of others. A basketball court in Shanghai called The House of Mamba &mdash; named after Kobe "Black Mamba" Bryant &mdash; applies that principle to the sport with the help of cutting-edge technology.</p><p>The House of Mamba is a smart basketball court developed by tech company AKQA and Nike. It has a floor that lights up to guide players through expertly designed training programs. The court is comprised of LED screens, sensors, and motion-tracking devices...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267865/4-cool-tech-innovations-that-could-revolutionize-sports">More</a>By <a href="/author/michelle-castillo" ><span class="byline">Michelle Castillo</span></a>Fri, 19 Sep 2014 14:15:00 -0400Adrian Peterson and our misguided debate about spankinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/268412/adrian-peterson-and-our-misguided-debate-about-spankinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/268412/adrian-peterson-and-our-misguided-debate-about-spanking<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62820_article_main/w/240/h/300/were-not-talking-a-spank-on-the-behind.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">In May, Adrian Peterson beat his 4-year-old son with a tree branch, according to a police report that cites Peterson's own testimony. He hit his son so badly that it left open wounds and welts on the boy's back, legs, buttocks, and scrotum. The beating was so vicious that the star running back then texted the child's mother &mdash; the two are not married &mdash; and confessed she would probably be mad because he "got kinda good wit the tail end of the switch."</p><p class="p1">What Adrian Peterson did not do, however, was spank his child.</p><p class="p1">And yet, much of the ensuing debate over the incident has sadly devolved...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268412/adrian-peterson-and-our-misguided-debate-about-spanking">More</a>By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>Fri, 19 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -0400On Ray Rice, the NFL should not be the final arbiter of moral justicehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267754/on-ray-rice-the-nfl-should-not-be-the-final-arbiter-of-moral-justicehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267754/on-ray-rice-the-nfl-should-not-be-the-final-arbiter-of-moral-justice<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62513_article_main/w/240/h/300/ray-rice-would-still-have-a-job-if-it-werent-for-the-media-firestorm.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Ray Rice will not play in the NFL for the foreseeable future. But make no mistake: It's not because he beat his wife, but because the NFL is afraid of losing money.</p><p class="p1">The league on Monday suspended Rice indefinitely after <em>TMZ</em> released a video showing him knocking his then-fianc&eacute;e (now his wife), Janay Palmer, unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator in February. The punishment came after NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell's much-maligned decision to initially ban Rice a meager two games, a decision so tone-deaf Goodell later apologized and announced harsher punishments for future perpetrators...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267754/on-ray-rice-the-nfl-should-not-be-the-final-arbiter-of-moral-justice">More</a>By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>Tue, 09 Sep 2014 06:12:00 -0400The need for speedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267558/the-need-for-speedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267558/the-need-for-speed<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62430_article_main/w/240/h/300/danny-thompson-right-honors-his-late-father-mickey-left-through-their-shared-love-of-racing.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1">DANNY THOMPSON </span></strong><strong><span class="s1">IS </span></strong>trying to become the fastest driver of a piston-engine car, just like his dad, Mickey Thompson.</p><p class="p2"><span class="s1">When the temperature dances around the century mark and the horizon shimmers over the Utah desert at Mike Cook's Bonneville Shootout, beginning Sept. 12, Danny Thompson will squeeze into the "cigar on four wheels" that he has rebuilt by hand and rage across the desert floor faster than a 747 at takeoff.</span></p><p class="p2"><span class="s1">When his turn comes, he will lie almost flat, his body mere inches from the earth, in a space the size of a coffin. He will see blinding white light ahead, noxious fumes will tease...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267558/the-need-for-speed">More</a>By Ann O'NeillSun, 07 Sep 2014 12:00:00 -0400Could Derek Jeter cost the Yankees a playoff spot?http://theweek.com/article/index/267431/could-derek-jeter-cost-the-yankees-a-playoff-spothttp://theweek.com/article/index/267431/could-derek-jeter-cost-the-yankees-a-playoff-spot<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62375_article_main/w/240/h/300/if-the-yankees-miss-the-playoffs-it-would-be-only-the-third-time-in-derek-jeterrsquos-career.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Derek Jeter has hurt the Yankees more than he has helped them this season.</p><p class="p1">As of Wednesday, the retiring Yankees shortstop has been worth -0.2 wins above replacement (WAR) on the year, per <em>Fangraphs</em>, playing his typically miserable defense while also posting the worst offensive numbers of his career. His on-base percentage is a tick lower than his career <em>batting average. </em>Among qualified shortstops, he's been third-worst at the plate in all of baseball this year, ahead of only a light-hitting 24-year-old still adjusting to the bigs and a glove-first no-name approaching his 30s.</p><p class="p1">Still, given his...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267431/could-derek-jeter-cost-the-yankees-a-playoff-spot">More</a>By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:22:00 -0400Why baseball is America's most dangerous spectator sporthttp://theweek.com/article/index/267254/why-baseball-is-americas-most-dangerous-spectator-sporthttp://theweek.com/article/index/267254/why-baseball-is-americas-most-dangerous-spectator-sport<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62316_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-game-is-changing-and-foul-balls-are-getting-blasted-harder-than-ever.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1">FRED FLETCHER DOESN'</span></strong><strong><span class="s1">T </span></strong>watch baseball anymore, but one night in May, he got a text from a friend: Something had happened at that evening's Atlanta Braves game. An 8-year-old boy had been hit in the head by a line drive foul off the bat of Milwaukee Brewer Carlos Gomez during the seventh inning. In bed, with the volume on low so he wouldn't wake his wife, Fletcher watched the 11 o'clock news and then turned on a replay of the game. He didn't see the boy, but when the ball rocketed into the stands behind the first-base dugout and the batter dropped to a knee in prayer, Fletcher began to weep.</p><p class="p3"><span class="s1">Fletcher...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267254/why-baseball-is-americas-most-dangerous-spectator-sport">More</a>By Christine Van DusenSun, 31 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0400What I learned from taking an aquacycling classhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266545/what-i-learned-from-taking-an-aquacycling-classhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266545/what-i-learned-from-taking-an-aquacycling-class<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61972_article_main/w/240/h/300/uh-not-me.jpg?209" /></P><p>The instructor helped us all get situated on our bicycles. I started pedaling. Music blared. It was just like a normal spin class... except I was in the pool.</p><p>Aquacycling is basically what it sounds like &mdash; an exercise regiment that combines bicycling and swimming for a total body workout. Instructors say it burns between 600 and 800 calories per 45-minute session and reduces cellulite without stressing the joints and muscles. Invented by an Italian physical therapist to help injured athletes, aquacycling has been available in gyms in France and Italy for years. Last year, the idea pedaled...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266545/what-i-learned-from-taking-an-aquacycling-class">More</a>By <a href="/author/amy-kraft" ><span class="byline">Amy Kraft</span></a>Tue, 19 Aug 2014 11:10:00 -0400