The Week: Most Recent Tech Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/techMost recent posts.en-usSat, 13 Sep 2014 12:00:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Tech Posts from THE WEEKSat, 13 Sep 2014 12:00:00 -0400Innovation of the week: Smart chopstickshttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267896/innovation-of-the-week-smart-chopstickshttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267896/innovation-of-the-week-smart-chopsticks<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62588_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Worried about tainted food? A new pair of "smart chopsticks" will gauge whether you can safely tuck in, said Yang Jie at <em>The Wall Street Journal</em>. The utensils, unveiled recently by Chinese tech giant Baidu, feature built-in sensors that "can detect oils containing unsanitary levels of contamination." Called Kuaisou, the chopsticks link to a smartphone app, which displays a "good" or "bad" reading depending on the quality of the food&rsquo;s cooking oil. Baidu says Kuaisou will also measure temperature, calories, and nutritional information.</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267896/innovation-of-the-week-smart-chopsticks">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 13 Sep 2014 12:00:00 -0400How the iPhone 6 could improve your commute -- and change the face of mass transithttp://theweek.com/article/index/267906/how-the-iphone-6-could-improve-your-commute--and-change-the-face-of-mass-transithttp://theweek.com/article/index/267906/how-the-iphone-6-could-improve-your-commute--and-change-the-face-of-mass-transit<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62592_article_main/w/240/h/300/navigating-this-could-get-a-whole-lot-easier.jpg?209" /></P><p>For mass-transit riders, it's a common pet peeve. You're about to pass through the turnstile, fare card in hand, just in time to make your train. But the person in front of you is not so prepared. He is still fumbling through his wallet or fishing in his pocket, wasting precious seconds and leaving you little recourse but to give an audible sigh of exasperation.</p><p>In metro systems around the world, this scene plays out thousands of times every day. But with Apple announcing the new iPhone 6 and Apple Watch, slow swipers could soon be a thing of the past.</p><p>That's because Apple Pay &mdash; a new feature...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267906/how-the-iphone-6-could-improve-your-commute--and-change-the-face-of-mass-transit">More</a>By <a href="/author/jacob-anbinder" ><span class="byline">Jacob Anbinder</span></a>Thu, 11 Sep 2014 06:04:00 -0400Seriously, what's the point of the Apple Watch?http://theweek.com/article/index/267854/seriously-whats-the-point-of-the-apple-watchhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267854/seriously-whats-the-point-of-the-apple-watch<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62564_article_main/w/240/h/300/not-yet-ready-for-prime-time.jpg?209" /></P><p>"We've got one more thing," Apple's CEO Tim Cook said, his voice tinged with excitement. A thunderous roar emanated from the crowd in the amphitheater, as if the product unveiling had suddenly morphed into a religious festivity, a techno-superchurch replete with its own house band (U2, naturally).</p><p>Tim Cook used Steve Jobs' mantra of "one more thing" to reveal the Apple Watch, the company's "most personal device ever." In a press release, Cook didn't hold back on the Watch's potential, saying, "Apple is poised to captivate the world with a revolutionary product that can enrich people&rsquo;s lives...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267854/seriously-whats-the-point-of-the-apple-watch">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 10 Sep 2014 11:07:00 -0400How to get the highest-end iPhone 6 Plus for just $120http://theweek.com/article/index/267833/how-to-get-the-highest-end-iphone-6-plus-for-just-120http://theweek.com/article/index/267833/how-to-get-the-highest-end-iphone-6-plus-for-just-120<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62565_article_main/w/240/h/300/switching-providers-could-make-a-big-difference-in-the-new-iphones-cost.jpg?209" /></P><p>Shares of Apple's stock bounced up three percent when Tim Cook unveiled the latest evolution of the iPhone on Tuesday, and then felt gravity when, later in the presentation, he introduced the Apple Watch to the world. The verdict of the market? Hard to say. I was watching the stock price of one of the iPhones' carriers. T-Mobile's shares dropped about 1.66 percent today, to 30.28.</p><p>I'd had a sense that T-Mobile is the company best positioned to take quick advantage of consumer stuff-lust to get the latest iPhone (and with it, in January, the Apple Watch.)</p><p>Here's why:</p><p>Like many of you, I recently...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267833/how-to-get-the-highest-end-iphone-6-plus-for-just-120">More</a>Marc AmbinderWed, 10 Sep 2014 09:31:00 -0400Why Reddit needs to do more than ban celebrity nudeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267812/why-reddit-needs-to-do-more-than-ban-celebrity-nudeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267812/why-reddit-needs-to-do-more-than-ban-celebrity-nudes<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62544_article_main/w/240/h/300/whats-it-going-to-be.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Life on Reddit, unlike on Facebook or Twitter, is what you make it. By creating your own front page out of any of the thousands upon thousands of subreddits, any user can alternately make Reddit into a collection of poorly-made memes, a news feed, a sports forum, or an ethereal collection of any pornography befitting the imaginations and laws of man.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-f6801121-5a03-ffc7-f220-67c16d1aa347">It's with that last mission in mind that many Redditors cried foul when the website banned any and all subreddits related to the leaked stolen nudes of celebrities like Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst, and Ariana Grande. While site admins claimed...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267812/why-reddit-needs-to-do-more-than-ban-celebrity-nudes">More</a>By Ben BranstetterWed, 10 Sep 2014 08:59:00 -0400Everything you need to know about the iPhone 6 and the Apple Watchhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267826/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-iphone-6-and-the-apple-watchhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267826/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-iphone-6-and-the-apple-watch<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62558_article_main/w/240/h/300/here-it-is.jpg?209" /></P><p>After months of feverish speculation, Apple has debuted not only the iPhone 6 (4.7 inches) and the iPhone 6 Plus (5.5 inches), but the much-rumored Apple Watch. While those were the most notable announcements from Apple's product launch today, the company also lifted the curtain on a bunch of other goodies.</p><p>Here's a closer look at everything Apple showed off &mdash; and how they're all connected.</p><p ><strong>Apple Watch</strong></p><p ><br /><br />(<em>Justin Sullivan/Getty Images</em>)</p><p>Everyone knew that Apple had a wearable device coming, but details were scant. And we still don't know everything about the Apple Watch &mdash; including...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267826/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-iphone-6-and-the-apple-watch">More</a>By <a href="/author/tyler-hayes" ><span class="byline">Tyler Hayes</span></a>Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:36:00 -0400The mounting Google Glass rebellionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267537/the-mounting-google-glass-rebellionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267537/the-mounting-google-glass-rebellion<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62425_article_main/w/240/h/300/lets-power-down-for-a-bit.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">In these grim times, there is some hope for our species: Google Glass may not be inevitable after all. Mat Honan of </span><span class="s2"><em>Wired,</em></span><span class="s1"> the </span><span class="s1">bible </span><span class="s2"></span><span class="s1">of</span><span class="s1"> the technorati, spent a year trying out Google Glass, a futuristic pair of eyeglasses equipped with a voice-activated wireless computer and camera and a tiny internet display in one lens. The trial didn't go well. Honan reports back that the Glass's ostentatious techiness &mdash; and its ability to photograph or video anything the wearer wants &mdash; made him the subject of derision and threats wherever he went. People "talk about you openly," Honan marvels; he...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267537/the-mounting-google-glass-rebellion">More</a>By <a href="/author/william-falk" ><span class="byline">William Falk</span></a>Sun, 07 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0400Why we need to prepare our kids for cyber-jobs -- and cyber-warfarehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266818/why-we-need-to-prepare-our-kids-for-cyber-jobs--and-cyber-warfarehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266818/why-we-need-to-prepare-our-kids-for-cyber-jobs--and-cyber-warfare<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62106_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-student-works-during-a-computer-coding-boot-camp-in-san-francisco.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>In April of this year, high school students from Iowa gathered at the Hilton Coliseum in Ames to match wits in a new kind of competition. They weren't testing their knowledge on traditional subjects like geography or history; they were competing at a computer "hackathon" to see who could code like a pro.</p><p>These students were participating in the 2014 IT-Olympics, sponsored by Iowa State University and the Technology Association of Iowa. This competition, along with other similar competitions taking place across the country, are part of an emerging grassroots effort to get young students interested...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266818/why-we-need-to-prepare-our-kids-for-cyber-jobs--and-cyber-warfare">More</a>By David FrancisFri, 05 Sep 2014 08:24:00 -0400How to stop misogynists from terrorizing the world of gamershttp://theweek.com/article/index/267333/how-to-stop-misogynists-from-terrorizing-the-world-of-gamershttp://theweek.com/article/index/267333/how-to-stop-misogynists-from-terrorizing-the-world-of-gamers<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62347_article_main/w/240/h/300/this-is-one-boys-club-we-can-do-without.jpg?209" /></P><p>The gaming precincts of the internet have long featured regular explosions of misogynist abuse noteworthy even by online standards, the bar for which is high indeed. Last week saw yet another pernicious example. Two women, Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian, caught the attention of a particularly nasty group of gamers &mdash; what Cliff Brzezinski calls the "Taliban of videogaming" &mdash; and were smeared, harassed, and threatened with rape and death.</p><p>The gamer Taliban are typical online trolls who organize themselves on anonymous message boards like 4chan and Reddit. They often argue that gaming...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267333/how-to-stop-misogynists-from-terrorizing-the-world-of-gamers">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Tue, 02 Sep 2014 12:45:00 -0400What's really limiting advances in computer techhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267370/whats-really-limiting-advances-in-computer-techhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267370/whats-really-limiting-advances-in-computer-tech<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62353_article_main/w/240/h/300/researchers-use-quantum-computing-to-view-the-brains-deep-structures-in-france.jpg?209" /></P><p>How does a biologist, or a computational neuroscientist, possibly have the wherewithal to stay current on all aspects of his field?</p><p><em>Nature</em>, one of the world's top journals for peer-reviewed scientific breakthroughs, does what it can to encourage cross-discipline knowledge sharing by publishing non-technical essays from the leading lights in particular fields. For a lay person, this is often the best way to become current, very quickly, on very difficult subjects.</p><p>This week's topic, when boiled down to its essence, is: how small, how fast, how powerful can computers possibly get? The writer who...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267370/whats-really-limiting-advances-in-computer-tech">More</a>Marc AmbinderTue, 02 Sep 2014 10:47:00 -0400