The Week: Most Recent U.S. Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/usMost recent posts.en-usTue, 02 Sep 2014 10:43:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent U.S. Posts from THE WEEKTue, 02 Sep 2014 10:43:00 -0400Why reparations could prevent the next Fergusonhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267269/why-reparations-could-prevent-the-next-fergusonhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267269/why-reparations-could-prevent-the-next-ferguson<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62317_article_main/w/240/h/300/when-it-comes-to-making-amends-for-past-wrongs-america-still-has-a-long-way-to-go.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Watching the events unfold in Ferguson, Missouri, I couldn't help thinking about the Holocaust and post-war Germany.</p><p>As the daughter of a Holocaust survivor, I've spent years watching Germany wrestle with its dark past. It's just one of many places that have made efforts to understand and compensate for a difficult history: For nearly three decades, countries as varied as South Africa, Rwanda, and the nations of Latin America and post-Communist Eastern Europe have been engaged in this process, often called "transitional justice." That's a broad term for the ways in which societies deal with...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267269/why-reparations-could-prevent-the-next-ferguson">More</a>By Belinda CooperTue, 02 Sep 2014 10:43:00 -0400New York is still a magnet for foreign studentshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267372/new-york-is-still-a-magnet-for-foreign-studentshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267372/new-york-is-still-a-magnet-for-foreign-students<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62352_article_main/w/240/h/300/new-york-city-draws-a-foreign-crowd.jpg?208" /></P><p>Among the more fascinating facts discovered in Brookings analyst Neil Ruiz's research on the geography of foreign students in the U.S. is where they decide to stay after they get their degree.</p><p>A plurality stay in New York City &mdash; or move there.</p><p>New York, it turns out, is very sticky. Foreign students are more likely to stay in New York City after graduation than anywhere else in the country. We all love New York, and it's the biggest city in the country, but there's no reason why it should be so magnetic, unless the city (and New York state) do things to make it attractive for foreign students...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267372/new-york-is-still-a-magnet-for-foreign-students">More</a>Marc AmbinderTue, 02 Sep 2014 09:31:00 -0400The Obama era is over. The presidency continues.http://theweek.com/article/index/267323/the-obama-era-is-over-the-presidency-continueshttp://theweek.com/article/index/267323/the-obama-era-is-over-the-presidency-continues<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62341_article_main/w/240/h/300/obamas-on-track-toward-a-typical-mdash-but-not-particularly-invigorating-mdash-end-to-his-presidency.jpg?208" /></P><p class="p1">Just in time for the season's final barbecue, President Obama last week backed off his promise (threat?) to "do something" about immigration reform by the end of the summer if Congress failed to send him a bill addressing the issue. He needs more time, we're told.</p><p class="p2">It's a dumb and uneventful conclusion to a dumb, uneventful summer in Washington politics. Obama's promise to rewrite America's immigration law through a mixture of executive fiat and a kind of officious neglect may have been calculated to incite a GOP freakout, a summer of polarizing impeachment rage, or a self-defeating government...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267323/the-obama-era-is-over-the-presidency-continues">More</a>By <a href="/author/michael-brendan-dougherty" ><span class="byline">Michael Brendan Dougherty</span></a>Tue, 02 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -0400The prison bunk bed lawsuithttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267213/the-prison-bunk-bed-lawsuithttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267213/the-prison-bunk-bed-lawsuit<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62281_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?208" /></P><p>A former inmate is suing an Oregon prison for failing to give him a ladder to climb in and out of the top bunk in his cell. Mitchell Ray Johnston claims it's the prison's fault he tore a ligament in his knee while getting down from his bunk. He is seeking $49,637 in damages.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267213/the-prison-bunk-bed-lawsuit">More</a>By The Week StaffMon, 01 Sep 2014 16:00:00 -0400These real-life Rosie the Riveters changed the face of laborhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267276/these-real-life-rosie-the-riveters-changed-the-face-of-laborhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267276/these-real-life-rosie-the-riveters-changed-the-face-of-labor<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62331_article_main/w/240/h/300/world-war-ii-women-at-work.jpg?208" /></P><p>When America entered World War II after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, it did so fully, committing all of its assets. As the men stepped into battle across Europe and in the Pacific theater, women entered the workforce, occupying the roles of their husbands, brothers, and sons.</p><p>Nearly 350,000 women volunteered to serve in the army both at home and abroad. Those housewives and students were suddenly in uniform, driving trucks, repairing airplanes, fixing engines, rigging parachutes, and manning aircrafts that acted as flying targets during training. It was a whole new world and they rose...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267276/these-real-life-rosie-the-riveters-changed-the-face-of-labor">More</a>By <a href="/author/lauren-hansen" ><span class="byline">Lauren Hansen</span></a>Mon, 01 Sep 2014 09:01:00 -0400The 'bless you' banhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267212/the-bless-you-banhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267212/the-bless-you-ban<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62280_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?208" /></P><p>A Tennessee high school senior was suspended for saying "bless you" after another student sneezed in class. Kendra Turner, 18, said her teacher told her that "bless you" was on her list of banned language, because "we're not going to have godly speaking in her class." When Turner protested that she has the right to freedom of speech, the teacher told her, "not in my class, you don't." The principal then suspended Turner.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/267212/the-bless-you-ban">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 30 Aug 2014 16:00:00 -0400How America's broken immigration system is failing the militaryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267240/how-americas-broken-immigration-system-is-failing-the-militaryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267240/how-americas-broken-immigration-system-is-failing-the-military<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62296_article_main/w/240/h/300/there-arent-enough-american-who-meet-the-militarys-basic-qualifications.jpg?208" /></P><p>America's hopelessly gridlocked immigration system is undermining more than our national economy &mdash; it's also knee-capping our national security.</p><p>The reason behind these twin failures is the same: the Rushmore-sized obstacles our immigration system creates in the recruitment of qualified foreigners. But when it comes to military recruitment, the irony is that while previous presidents have used their statutory authority to draft immigrants against their will, President Obama hasn't used his to recruit even <em>willing</em> immigrants, something <span ></span>he could change via the <span ></span>executive initiative on immigration...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267240/how-americas-broken-immigration-system-is-failing-the-military">More</a>By <a href="/author/shikha-dalmia" ><span class="byline">Shikha Dalmia</span></a>Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:00:00 -0400The dangers of our passionless American lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267052/the-dangers-of-our-passionless-american-lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267052/the-dangers-of-our-passionless-american-life<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62205_article_main/w/240/h/300/no-the-american-dream-doesnt-have-to-feel-like-revolutionary-road.jpg?208" /></P><p>Many of my fellow conservative columnists have lamented in recent weeks that the troubling trend of Western men voyaging to the Middle East to become terrorists has its roots in the stultifying boredom of life in modern capitalistic society.</p><p><em>TheWeek.com</em>'s Michael Brendan Dougherty's explored the topic in a post called "How the West produces jihadi tourists." <em>The New York Times</em>' Ross Douthat ventured into similar territory in his "Our thoroughly modern enemies." <em>National Review's</em> Charles C.W. Cooke was on board, too, in a post titled "Sadly, totalitarianism is exciting."</p><p>"One reason that liberty...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267052/the-dangers-of-our-passionless-american-life">More</a>By <a href="/author/matt-k-lewis" ><span class="byline">Matt K. Lewis</span></a>Fri, 29 Aug 2014 06:07:00 -0400The real reason conservatives should be outraged that police killed a white youthhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267123/the-real-reason-conservatives-should-be-outraged-that-police-killed-a-white-youthhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267123/the-real-reason-conservatives-should-be-outraged-that-police-killed-a-white-youth<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62235_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-photo-shared-on-a-facebook-page-for-dillon-taylor-shows-a-scene-similar-to-whats-been-happening.jpg?208" /></P><p>In the past few days, conservative media outlets from Rush Limbaugh's radio behemoth to <em>The Washington Times, </em>commentary sites to blogs, have discovered the Aug. 11 death of Dillon Taylor, a white 20-year-old gunned down by police outside a Salt Lake City 7-Eleven. The unidentified officer was "not white," and Taylor's brother insists that Dillon was not armed.</p><p>The main thrust of the conservative outrage is that the national media is ignoring Taylor's killing while dedicating extensive time and talent to the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267123/the-real-reason-conservatives-should-be-outraged-that-police-killed-a-white-youth">More</a>By <a href="/author/peter-weber" ><span class="byline">Peter Weber</span></a>Thu, 28 Aug 2014 06:12:00 -0400The government is getting into the fact-checking business. Be very, very afraid.http://theweek.com/article/index/267097/the-government-is-getting-into-the-fact-checking-business-be-very-very-afraidhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267097/the-government-is-getting-into-the-fact-checking-business-be-very-very-afraid<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62226_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-new-project-truthy-is-no-laughing-matter.jpg?208" /></P><p>Fact checking has become a virtual industry unto itself in the last several years, but this trend has arguably created more controversies than it attempts to resolve. And with the advent of a government-funded fact-checking project called Truthy, it appears our fact-checking culture may have finally veered into the sinister.</p><p>Professional fact checkers, many of whom sprout from traditional media outlets that themselves should be the subject of scrutiny, attempt to debunk what they see as false narratives and dubious claims. They offer charming methods of ranking their findings, such as pants on...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267097/the-government-is-getting-into-the-fact-checking-business-be-very-very-afraid">More</a>By <a href="/author/edward-morrissey" ><span class="byline">Edward Morrissey</span></a>Wed, 27 Aug 2014 06:32:00 -0400