The Week: Most Recent World Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/worldMost recent posts.en-usThu, 23 Oct 2014 09:16:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent World Posts from THE WEEKThu, 23 Oct 2014 09:16:00 -0400When Khomeini said no to Iranian nukeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270319/when-khomeini-said-no-to-iranian-nukeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270319/when-khomeini-said-no-to-iranian-nukes<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63598_article_main/w/240/h/300/ayatollah-ruhollah-khomeini-long-told-his-followers-that-a-nuclear-response-was-not-an-answer.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The nuclear negotiations between six world powers and Iran, which are now nearing their November deadline, remain deadlocked over U.S. demands that Iran dismantle the bulk of its capacity to enrich uranium. The demand is based on the suspicion that Iran has worked secretly to develop nuclear weapons in the past and can't be trusted not to do so again.</p><p>Iran argues that it has rejected nuclear weapons as incompatible with Islam and cites a fatwa of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei as proof. American and European officials remain skeptical, however, that the issue is really governed by Shiite Islamic...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270319/when-khomeini-said-no-to-iranian-nukes">More</a>By Gareth PorterThu, 23 Oct 2014 09:16:00 -040010 things you need to know today: October 23, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270472/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-23-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270472/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-23-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63667_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-police-officer-stands-guard-in-downtown-ottawa.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Ottawa locked down after gunman attacks Parliament</strong><br />A gunman, identified as Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, shot and killed a soldier guarding Canada's National War Memorial, then entered the Parliament building across a plaza and started shooting there. Zehaf-Bibeau, who was believed to be a convert to Islam identified as a "high-risk traveler," was killed in a shootout with security personnel. The attack left Ottawa, Canada's capital, on lockdown, and came three days after an attack on two soldiers in Quebec. [<em>Bloomberg News</em>, <em>The Washington Post</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270472/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-23-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:59:00 -0400The U.S. is about to sell weapons to Vietnam. That's bad news for China.http://theweek.com/article/index/270307/the-us-is-about-to-sell-weapons-to-vietnam-thats-bad-news-for-chinahttp://theweek.com/article/index/270307/the-us-is-about-to-sell-weapons-to-vietnam-thats-bad-news-for-china<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63586_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-sea-based-dispute-between-china-and-vietnam-has-kicked-off-a-new-round-of-hostilities.jpg?209" /></P><p class="Body">One morning last June, the people of Vietnam woke up to someone else's oil rig in their backyard. The 30,000-ton Haiyang Shiyou-981, owned by the China National Offshore Oil Corporation, was parked 70 miles inside waters controlled by Vietnam.</p><p class="Body">The resulting standoff at sea, in which one Vietnamese fishing boat was sunk, has driven Vietnam to seek assistance from an unlikely source. Vietnam has requested its old enemy, the United States, sell it weapons to counter an even older enemy, China.</p><p class="Body">Vietnam and China have shared a mutual border for more than 2,000 years. Those have not exactly been happy...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270307/the-us-is-about-to-sell-weapons-to-vietnam-thats-bad-news-for-china">More</a>By <a href="/author/kyle-mizokami" ><span class="byline">Kyle Mizokami</span></a>Thu, 23 Oct 2014 06:08:00 -0400Why is the Pentagon stuffing caves in Norway full of tanks?http://theweek.com/article/index/270353/why-is-the-pentagon-stuffing-caves-in-norway-full-of-tankshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270353/why-is-the-pentagon-stuffing-caves-in-norway-full-of-tanks<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63627_article_main/w/240/h/300/coming-soon-to-norway.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The Pentagon sent tanks, armored vehicles, and containers full of other military gear to caves in Norway. It's all for the U.S. Marine Corps, which wants to update and expand its Scandinavian stockpile.</p><p>The Corps has stashed weapons and equipment in the Norwegian countryside since the 1980s. With this setup, Marines can fly in and be ready for a fight in no time.</p><p>In addition, the Pentagon saves money by not having to keep a large force in Norway year-round. Washington already spends billions each year running huge bases across Europe.</p><p>But in the past, Marines rushing toward the sound of gunfire...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270353/why-is-the-pentagon-stuffing-caves-in-norway-full-of-tanks">More</a>By Joseph TrevithickWed, 22 Oct 2014 09:57:00 -0400The Lebanese Army is inadvertently creating an extremist incubatorhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270213/the-lebanese-army-is-inadvertently-creating-an-extremist-incubatorhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270213/the-lebanese-army-is-inadvertently-creating-an-extremist-incubator<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63590_article_main/w/240/h/300/lebanese-troops-face-mounting-public-frustration-as-a-result-of-their-tactics.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Being a foot soldier in the Lebanese Armed Forces surely ranks high on the list of unenviable professions. Aside from trying to maintain calm along the country's perennially hot borders with both Israel and Syria, the Lebanese army has been repeatedly targeted by suicide bombers from radical Sunni groups over the past year.</p><p>But the job is not thankless. After winning a five-day battle against Islamist fighters in the Lebanese town of Arsal, the army has enjoyed massive public support. Since the early August clashes, flags bearing the armed forces insignia have appeared in window displays and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270213/the-lebanese-army-is-inadvertently-creating-an-extremist-incubator">More</a>By E.K.Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:20:00 -040010 things you need to know today: October 22, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270374/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-22-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270374/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-22-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63631_article_main/w/240/h/300/bradleenbspbeing-awarded-a-presidential-medal-of-freedom-in-2013.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Former <em>Washington Post</em> editor Ben Bradlee dies at 93</strong><br />Legendary <em>Washington Post</em> editor Ben Bradlee, who presided over the Watergate reporting that brought down Richard Nixon's presidency, died on Tuesday. He was 93. Bradlee took over leadership of the <em>Post</em> in 1965 and helped make the newspaper one of the world's great dailies. Bradlee was widely praised for making tough calls, including publishing the Pentagon Papers, a secret Pentagon history of the Vietnam war. "For Benjamin Bradlee, journalism was more than a profession &mdash; it was a public good vital to our democracy," President Obama said...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270374/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-22-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Wed, 22 Oct 2014 07:59:00 -0400Caretakers of a disputed landhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270069/caretakers-of-a-disputed-landhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270069/caretakers-of-a-disputed-land<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63582_article_main/w/240/h/300/turkana.jpg?209" /></P><p>In East Africa, in a nook at the northern tip of Kenya between South Sudan and Uganda, there lies a disputed region called the Ilemi Triangle. South Sudan and Kenya both claim it, but so do the people who have always called this land home. They include the Turkana, a small, traditionally nomadic group of herders.</p><p ><br />A man herds livestock from grazing grounds at the end of a day. | (<em>REUTERS/Siegfried Modola</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />(<em>REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />A woman and children bathe in a hot spring pool in the Turkana region of the Ilemi Triangle. | (<em>REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic</em>)</p><p><br />But a decades-long drought has forced the...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270069/caretakers-of-a-disputed-land">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a>Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:30:00 -0400Will Kobani be ISIS's Waterloo?http://theweek.com/article/index/270294/will-kobani-be-isiss-waterloohttp://theweek.com/article/index/270294/will-kobani-be-isiss-waterloo<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63578_article_main/w/240/h/300/turkish-tanks-have-been-sitting-idly-amassed-nearby-as-isis-militants-continue-to-try-to-capture.jpg?209" /></P><p>Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militants have been trying to capture the Syrian town of Kobani for about a month. On Oct. 7, right after the U.S. started bombing ISIS targets around the primarily Kurdish border town, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned that "Kobani is about to fall."</p><p>That dour assessment was shared by U.S. military. "Airstrikes alone are not going to fix this, not going to save the town of Kobani," Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said Oct. 8. "We know that. We know that ISIL is going to continue to grab ground and there are going to be villages and towns...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270294/will-kobani-be-isiss-waterloo">More</a>By <a href="/author/peter-weber" ><span class="byline">Peter Weber</span></a>Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:22:00 -0400Syrian women know how to defeat ISIShttp://theweek.com/article/index/270220/syrian-women-know-how-to-defeat-isishttp://theweek.com/article/index/270220/syrian-women-know-how-to-defeat-isis<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63568_article_main/w/240/h/300/first-step-is-getting-humanitarian-aid-to-the-millions-in-need.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>To the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, Syrian women are slaves. To much of the rest of the world, they are victims.</p><p>It's time we expose their real identity: an untapped resource for creating lasting peace. Listening to and implementing the ideas of women still living in Syria is key to weakening ISIS and stabilizing the region at large because, in many ways, they have a better track record laying the foundations for peace and democracy than any other group.</p><p>Over the last two years, we've worked side-by-side with Syrian women leaders as they propose concrete steps to end the war. Most recently...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270220/syrian-women-know-how-to-defeat-isis">More</a>By Michelle Barsa and Kristin WilliamsTue, 21 Oct 2014 08:56:00 -040010 things you need to know today: October 21, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270292/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-21-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/270292/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-21-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63576_article_main/w/240/h/300/pistoriusnbspprepares-to-be-led-out-of-court.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Oscar Pistorius sentenced to five years for manslaughter</strong><br />South African double-amputee track star Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison on Tuesday for killing his girlfriend, model Reeva Steenkamp, on Valentine's Day in 2013. Pistorius, who said he thought an intruder was in his bathroom when he fired through the door and killed Steenkamp, was acquitted of murder but convicted on Sept. 12 of the South African equivalent of manslaughter in the U.S. legal system. The judge said the sentence struck a "delicate balance" between mercy and justice. [<em>The Washington Post</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270292/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-october-21-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Tue, 21 Oct 2014 07:57:00 -0400