The Week: Most Recent World Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/worldMost recent posts.en-usThu, 24 Apr 2014 09:31:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent World Posts from THE WEEKThu, 24 Apr 2014 09:31:00 -0400Norway's military cut down on sexual harassment in the most remarkable wayhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260325/norways-military-cut-down-on-sexual-harassment-in-the-most-remarkable-wayhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260325/norways-military-cut-down-on-sexual-harassment-in-the-most-remarkable-way<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59065_article_main/w/240/h/300/building-trust-in-tight-intimate-quartersnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>It's so crazy, it just might work.</p><p>That's how I imagine the conversation ended when the Norwegian military decided to go ahead with its radical new approach to curbing sexual harassment within its ranks.</p><p>What's so crazy? Well, rather than separating men and women, as one might expect in such a situation, the Norwegian military has put them even closer together. Like, in the same room.</p><p>Unisex dorms are the Norwegian military's answer to the problem of sexual harassment.</p><p>At the military base in northern Norway where they are trying out this new approach, two female soldiers live with four male...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260325/norways-military-cut-down-on-sexual-harassment-in-the-most-remarkable-way">More</a>By Emily LodishThu, 24 Apr 2014 09:31:00 -040010 things you need to know today: April 24, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260440/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-24-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260440/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-24-2014<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59108_article_main/w/240/h/300/hamas-and-fatah-join-forcesnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>1. Rival Palestinian factions announce plans for a unity government</strong><br />The two main Palestinian factions, Fatah and Hamas, announced plans to form a unity government in the next few weeks. The rival groups &mdash; Fatah controls the West Bank, Hamas runs the Gaza Strip &mdash; made a violent break in 2007. The U.S. said it was disappointed with the reconciliation deal and predicted it would "seriously complicate" peace efforts with Israel. Hamas's militant Islamists don't accept Israel's right to exist. [<em>Voice of America</em>, <em>The Jerusalem Post</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260440/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-24-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Thu, 24 Apr 2014 07:52:00 -0400Meet the last of India's elephant keepershttp://theweek.com/article/index/259855/meet-the-last-of-indias-elephant-keepershttp://theweek.com/article/index/259855/meet-the-last-of-indias-elephant-keepers<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59100_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?204" /></P><p>Imagine that a small bird is placed on your shoulder at birth.</p><p>From that day on, the bird protects and helps feeds you, celebrates in your joy, and comforts you during times of pain. You're never apart from the bird, and his life is inextricably bound with yours. For better or for worse, you are one half of a pair, from your first breath to your last.</p><p>That, according to photographer Jon Augustine, is the story of India's elephants and their keepers, known as mahouts.</p><p ><br /> (<em>Jon Augustine</em>)</p><p><br /> New Delhi banned privately owned elephants more than a decade ago, but that hasn't stopped zoos, circuses,...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259855/meet-the-last-of-indias-elephant-keepers">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a>Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:52:00 -0400Why China's Communist Party is headed for collapsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260335/why-chinas-communist-party-is-headed-for-collapsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260335/why-chinas-communist-party-is-headed-for-collapse<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59073_article_main/w/240/h/300/regardless-of-party-china-will-continue-to-exist-in-some-form.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Nothing lasts forever, not even the Chinese Communist Party. Whether it will perish in a few years, or last for decades to come, there are a series of worrying indicators. Beijing has been slow to implement reforms that will orient the economy on a sustainable path. President Xi Jinping is knee-deep in an anti-corruption campaign against senior Chinese Communist Party (CCP) members unprecedented in its reach and scope in modern China, raising concerns about the party's ability to police itself. Meanwhile, outside the corridors of power, China's increasingly sophisticated populace is concerned...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260335/why-chinas-communist-party-is-headed-for-collapse">More</a>By Isaac Stone FishWed, 23 Apr 2014 09:14:00 -040010 things you need to know today: April 23, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260354/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-23-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260354/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-23-2014<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59079_article_main/w/240/h/300/off-to-asianbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>1. Justices uphold Michigan's affirmative action ban in college admissions</strong><br />The Supreme Court, in a 6-2 ruling, upheld a Michigan constitutional amendment banning affirmative action policies in public university admissions. Michigan and other states, such as Florida and California, that have outlawed taking race into consideration in higher education have seen sharp drops in enrollment of black and Hispanic students, but the court's majority said voters, not courts, should decide what policies to use. [<em>The New York Times</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260354/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-23-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Wed, 23 Apr 2014 07:53:00 -0400Why Narendra Modi is not a shoo-in to become India's next prime ministerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260324/why-narendra-modi-is-not-a-shoo-in-to-become-indias-next-prime-ministerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260324/why-narendra-modi-is-not-a-shoo-in-to-become-indias-next-prime-minister<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59064_article_main/w/240/h/300/modis-support-is-not-complete-mdash-and-his-rule-is-still-unsure.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>NEW DELHI, India &mdash; Foreign investors seem confident that Narendra Modi will become India's next prime minister in the elections that began April 7.</p><p>They've shown their approval by pouring about $4.4 billion into India since March &mdash; roughly around when Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) began stretching its poll lead over the ruling Congress party.</p><p>Indian investors, however, see things differently. They have been selling local stocks, and not because they're bearish about how Modi would steer the economy.</p><p>On the contrary, the controversial politician has become wildly popular by...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260324/why-narendra-modi-is-not-a-shoo-in-to-become-indias-next-prime-minister">More</a>By James TapperTue, 22 Apr 2014 17:54:00 -0400Obama's oil sanctions against Iran aren't workinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/259990/obamas-oil-sanctions-against-iran-arent-workinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/259990/obamas-oil-sanctions-against-iran-arent-working<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58900_article_main/w/240/h/300/an-iranian-crude-oil-supertanker-anchors-off-of-singapore.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The Obama administration may be betting that sanctions on Iranian oil exports force the country to make concessions over its nuclear program. But Iran is now exporting more oil than at any time since mid-2012, raising doubts about how effective that sanctions strategy has been.</p><p>Iran's crude oil exports jumped to 1.65 million barrels per day in February, thanks to increased purchases by China, India, and South Korea, according to revised data released Friday by the International Energy Agency. That is well above the informal cap of about one million barrels per day set by the administration as...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259990/obamas-oil-sanctions-against-iran-arent-working">More</a>By Keith JohnsonTue, 22 Apr 2014 08:34:00 -040010 things you need to know today: April 22, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260289/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-22-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260289/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-22-2014<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59036_article_main/w/240/h/300/meb-keflezighi-raises-his-fist-in-victorynbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>1. The U.S. might cut its Afghanistan force to 5,000</strong><br />The U.S. next year might cut the number of troops it leaves in Afghanistan below 10,000, which is the minimum military leaders say will be needed to train Afghan forces, <em>Reuters</em> reports. There are close to 33,000 American soldiers in Afghanistan now, down from 100,000 in 2011. White House officials, encouraged by Afghanistan's surprisingly smooth April 5 presidential election, are considering reducing the number below 5,000. [<em>Reuters</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260289/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-22-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Tue, 22 Apr 2014 07:59:00 -0400Putin's risky bet in eastern Ukrainehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260161/putins-risky-bet-in-eastern-ukrainehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260161/putins-risky-bet-in-eastern-ukraine<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59008_article_main/w/240/h/300/if-ukraine-fights-back-putin-will-be-in-trouble.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>To understand why Russian President Vladimir Putin has been willing to escalate tensions in the Ukraine even after annexing the Crimean peninsula, it's instructive to remember back to 2008 when he told George W. Bush that "Ukraine is not even a country." This comment was broadly and accurately interpreted to demonstrate the contempt Putin has long held for Ukraine, and for the possibility of a strong Ukraine aligned with the West. But few in the West considered that Putin's words might also reflect the genuine weakness of state formation and cohesion in much of the former Soviet Union. And that...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260161/putins-risky-bet-in-eastern-ukraine">More</a>By Lincoln MitchellMon, 21 Apr 2014 09:50:00 -040010 things you need to know today: April 21, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260226/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-21-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/260226/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-21-2014<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59007_article_main/w/240/h/300/runners-get-setnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>1. Huge field lines up to run the Boston Marathon</strong><br />About 36,000 athletes converged to run in the 118th Boston Marathon under tight security on Monday, part of the storied race's emotional return a year after a deadly bombing at the finish line. The field is the event's second largest ever &mdash; race organizers expanded it so roughly 5,000 runners prevented from finishing after last year's blast could run again. "We're taking back our finish line," a runner from California said. [<em>The Boston Globe</em>, <em>Reuters</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260226/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-april-21-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Mon, 21 Apr 2014 07:57:00 -0400