The Week: Most Recent World Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/worldMost recent posts.en-usFri, 19 Dec 2014 16:26:00 -0500http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent World Posts from THE WEEKFri, 19 Dec 2014 16:26:00 -0500The week's best photojournalismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/274057/the-weeks-best-photojournalismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/274057/the-weeks-best-photojournalism<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65188_article_main/w/240/h/300/best-photojournalism-flares.jpg?209" /></P><p ><br /> Coast Guard members send up flares during training on Plum Island, Massachusetts. | (<em>REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class MyeongHi Clegg/handout</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />Alan Gross embraces Tim Rieser (center), a member of Sen. Patrick Leahy's (Vt.) office, as he disembarks from a government plane with wife Judy, at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. Gross was released this week after five years of captivity in Cuba. | (<em>REUTERS/Jill Zuckman/Gross Family Spokesperson/Handout via Reuters</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />Cyclists wearing heavy clothes ride in subzero temperatures in Lianyungang, China. | (<em>REUTERS/Stringer</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />People look at...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/274057/the-weeks-best-photojournalism">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a> and <a href="/author/lauren-hansen" ><span class="byline">Lauren Hansen</span></a>Fri, 19 Dec 2014 16:26:00 -0500The week's editorial cartoonshttp://theweek.com/article/index/274059/the-weeks-editorial-cartoonshttp://theweek.com/article/index/274059/the-weeks-editorial-cartoons<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65181_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p ><br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> **See more cartoons**</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/274059/the-weeks-editorial-cartoons">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 19 Dec 2014 15:00:00 -0500Are the missing students protests turning into a Mexican Spring?http://theweek.com/article/index/273743/are-the-missing-students-protests-turning-into-a-mexican-springhttp://theweek.com/article/index/273743/are-the-missing-students-protests-turning-into-a-mexican-spring<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65001_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-protest-in-mexico-city-dec-6.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>In Mexico City, tens of thousands marched downtown, with a few hundred smashing the windows of banks and shops. In southern Oaxaca state, protesters blockaded the entrance to an oil refinery. In Ciudad Juarez, demonstrators took over a cross-border bridge, letting cars enter from the United States toll-free. In Guerrero state, rioters burned four police cars.</p><p>This all happened earlier this month. But almost every day, citizens take to the streets somewhere in Mexico, from gatherings with a few hundred to mass marches with more than 100,000.</p><p>Mexico's biggest protests in years began two months...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273743/are-the-missing-students-protests-turning-into-a-mexican-spring">More</a>By Ioan GrilloFri, 19 Dec 2014 11:52:00 -050010 things you need to know today: December 19, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/274012/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-19-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/274012/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-19-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65154_article_main/w/240/h/300/an-airstrike-hits-an-isis-positionnbsp.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Stocks surge for a second day after soothing words from the Fed</strong><br />The Dow Jones industrial average jumped by 421 points on Thursday &mdash; its biggest one-day increase in more than three years. The gains capped Wall Street's biggest two-day advance since late 2011. The surge were triggered by reassuring comments by the Federal Reserve, which said in a statement following its latest policy meeting that although the economy was improving, policymakers would be "patient" in raising interest rates. Investors interpreted that as a signal that the central bank would not raise interest rates until next...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/274012/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-19-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Fri, 19 Dec 2014 07:59:00 -0500Why Pakistan won't hunt down the terrorists within its bordershttp://theweek.com/article/index/273946/why-pakistan-wont-hunt-down-the-terrorists-within-its-bordershttp://theweek.com/article/index/273946/why-pakistan-wont-hunt-down-the-terrorists-within-its-borders<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65114_article_main/w/240/h/300/pakistans-government-may-not-be-willing-to-answer-this-girls-plea.jpg?209" /></P><p>If there is anything approaching a silver lining in the horrific slaughter of 132 school children in Peshawar, it is the united outrage in Pakistan against Tehreek-e-Taliban (or the Pakistan Taliban) that perpetrated this gruesome attack. Virtually every newspaper in the country &mdash; left, right, and center &mdash; demanded that the Pakistani establishment declare a "zero tolerance" policy toward all Islamist terrorists, no ifs, ands, or buts.</p><p>Pakistan's largest English-language newspaper, <em>The News, </em>asked Pakistanis to think about what support for Islamist extremists has done to them. "Nothing...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273946/why-pakistan-wont-hunt-down-the-terrorists-within-its-borders">More</a>By <a href="/author/shikha-dalmia" ><span class="byline">Shikha Dalmia</span></a>Fri, 19 Dec 2014 06:09:00 -0500Why Obama was right to give Cuba a 'full bailout'http://theweek.com/article/index/273901/why-obama-was-right-to-give-cuba-a-full-bailouthttp://theweek.com/article/index/273901/why-obama-was-right-to-give-cuba-a-full-bailout<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65099_article_main/w/240/h/300/its-time-to-stop-punishing-all-cubans-for-the-actions-of-their-dictators.jpg?209" /></P><p>In 2004, then-State Sen. Barack Obama was asked about the half-century-old economic and political embargo of Cuba. He said, "I think it's time for us to end the embargo in Cuba &mdash; the Cuban embargo has failed to provide the sorts of rising standards of living and has squeezed the innocents in Cuba and utterly failed in the efforts to overthrow Castro, who has now been there since I was born, so it is time for us to acknowledge that this particular policy is available."</p><p>During the darkest days of his presidency, during the lost years of 2013 and 2014, you would probably be right to assume...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273901/why-obama-was-right-to-give-cuba-a-full-bailout">More</a>Marc AmbinderThu, 18 Dec 2014 11:48:00 -0500Why the Sony hack changes everythinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/273899/why-the-sony-hack-changes-everythinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/273899/why-the-sony-hack-changes-everything<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65097_article_main/w/240/h/300/this-goes-beyond-one-movie.jpg?209" /></P><p>In 2009, back before Edward Snowden showed the world how the National Security Agency had conquered cyberspace, its former director, and his then-boss, retired Adm. Mike McConnell, appeared on <em>60 Minutes</em> to urge Americans to prepare for a massive wave of increasingly damaging cyber-attacks by foreign governments and well-funded terrorist groups.</p><p>McConnell, an executive at Booz Allen, a major contractor for the intelligence community, laid out a scenario in which China (or some other country) attacked the supervisory and control systems of a major public utility. He predicted deaths and injuries...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273899/why-the-sony-hack-changes-everything">More</a>Marc AmbinderThu, 18 Dec 2014 10:42:00 -0500It ain't easy being green in the world's most polluted cityhttp://theweek.com/article/index/273773/it-aint-easy-being-green-in-the-worlds-most-polluted-cityhttp://theweek.com/article/index/273773/it-aint-easy-being-green-in-the-worlds-most-polluted-city<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65022_article_main/w/240/h/300/some-of-new-delhis-residents-are-working-toward-being-greener-but-the-movement-is-still-new.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Away from jarring city traffic and dusty New Delhi streets, the Upadhyes' rooftop garden is a lush green haven of vegetables and herbs, even after the summer rains have drawn to a close.</p><p>The couple, both freelance filmmakers, said they visited the local market only twice a month this season. Before, they went every two days. Their produce &mdash; including okra, coriander, and amaranth &mdash; came from four 16-square-foot planting boxes filled with a careful mix of soil and seed.</p><p>"Eating what you grow is a different kind of joy," said Yamini Upadhye. "In the middle of dinner I run up to get...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273773/it-aint-easy-being-green-in-the-worlds-most-polluted-city">More</a>By Ankita RaoThu, 18 Dec 2014 08:38:00 -050010 things you need to know today: December 18, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/273915/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-18-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/273915/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-18-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65094_article_main/w/240/h/300/president-obama-and-cuban-president-raul-castro-address-their-nations.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Obama announces historic diplomatic thaw with Cuba</strong><br />The U.S. and Cuba announced Wednesday that they would reestablish diplomatic relations after a half-century rift that began in the Cold War. "Isolation has not worked," Obama said. "It's time for a new approach." The decision followed 18 months of secret talks, and Cuba's Wednesday release of U.S. aid contractor Alan Gross, who had been held by the communist Caribbean government for five years. Conservatives in Congress vowed to fight the easing of sanctions. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said the rapprochement amounted to "coddling dictators." ...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273915/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-december-18-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Thu, 18 Dec 2014 08:00:00 -0500Capitalism isn't a cure-all for Cubahttp://theweek.com/article/index/273876/capitalism-isnt-a-cure-all-for-cubahttp://theweek.com/article/index/273876/capitalism-isnt-a-cure-all-for-cuba<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0130/65077_article_main/w/240/h/300/younger-generations-may-not-remember-the-civil-society-of-the-pre-castro-days.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">President Obama, President Ra&uacute;l Castro, and Pope Francis have helped open a new chapter in Cuba-U.S. relations. It is about time: 54 years of a policy of not dislodging communist rule in Cuba is more than enough.</p><p class="p1">Many Cuban-American legislators and unreconstructed Cold Warriors are complaining that restoring diplomatic relations will be a setback to the cause of Cuban freedom and a victory for the Castro brothers. But the truth is that any change to the status quo, particularly one that puts the trade embargo in doubt, will increase the short-term leverage of Americans demanding concessions...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/273876/capitalism-isnt-a-cure-all-for-cuba">More</a>By <a href="/author/michael-brendan-dougherty" ><span class="byline">Michael Brendan Dougherty</span></a>Thu, 18 Dec 2014 06:06:00 -0500