The Week: Most Recent World Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/worldMost recent posts.en-usSat, 22 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -0500http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent World Posts from THE WEEKSat, 22 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -0500Inside Turkey's shadow war with ISIShttp://theweek.com/article/index/271963/inside-turkeys-shadow-war-with-isishttp://theweek.com/article/index/271963/inside-turkeys-shadow-war-with-isis<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64282_article_main/w/240/h/300/fighters-taking-on-isis-are-receiving-help-from-an-unlikely-place.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>On a warm night in August, not long after the end of Ramadan, a Syrian refugee named Abu Salma boarded a bus in the Turkish border town of Kilis wearing his best clothes &mdash; crisp new jeans and a collared shirt.</p><p>As far as his family knew, he was traveling to a nearby wedding. In reality, he was headed to Urfa, a conservative, middle-class town in southern Turkey, where he met three other Syrians for a secret, one-time mission: to kidnap a group of men smuggling foreign fighters into Syria for the Islamic State (ISIS).</p><p>As the United States and the West continue their war against the makeshift...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/271963/inside-turkeys-shadow-war-with-isis">More</a>By Jeff NeumannSat, 22 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -050010 things you need to know today: November 22, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272474/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-22-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272474/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-22-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64483_article_main/w/240/h/300/obamas-orders-will-not-affect-the-number-of-us-troops-remaining-in-afghanistan.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Obama quietly approves expanded U.S. role in Afghanistan</strong><br />Over the past few weeks, President Barack Obama reportedly gave the go-ahead on new guidelines for U.S. missions in Afghanistan. The new orders will not affect the number of U.S. troops stationed in the country &mdash; total American forces in Afghanistan are expected to be lowered to 9,800 by the end of 2014 &mdash; but they will impact the scope of the remaining troops' missions. Previous plans had limited troops to counterterrorism missions against al Qaeda, but the new guidelines will allow U.S. forces to provide air support to Afghan...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272474/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-22-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a>Sat, 22 Nov 2014 10:38:00 -0500The week's best photojournalismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272453/the-weeks-best-photojournalismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272453/the-weeks-best-photojournalism<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64481_article_main/w/240/h/300/kenyan-tea-farmers.jpg?209" /></P><p ><br /> Dog owner Dean Clark presents Frida, a female Chihuahua, as the San Francisco Board of Supervisors issues a special commendation naming Frida "Mayor of San Francisco for a Day," part of the city's efforts to support local animal shelters. | (<em>REUTERS/Stephen Lam</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />Snowy clouds roll off Lake Erie in Buffalo, New York. | (<em>REUTERS/Lindsay DeDario</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />Kelly Bronze turkeys stand in their enclosure on a farm in England. | (<em>REUTERS/Phil Noble</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />An Afghan girl shows off her burqa, which was cut down to fit her size, while playing on the outskirts of Kandahar. | (<em>AP Photo/Allauddin Khan</em>)</p><p ><br /><br /> <br />A man (top and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272453/the-weeks-best-photojournalism">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a> and <a href="/author/lauren-hansen" ><span class="byline">Lauren Hansen</span></a>Fri, 21 Nov 2014 15:30:00 -0500The week's best editorial cartoonshttp://theweek.com/article/index/272389/the-weeks-best-editorial-cartoonshttp://theweek.com/article/index/272389/the-weeks-best-editorial-cartoons<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64445_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /> <br /><br /><br /></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272389/the-weeks-best-editorial-cartoons">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 21 Nov 2014 13:40:00 -0500How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraqhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272391/how-western-companies-sneakily-sold-chemical-weapons-components-to-syria-and-iraqhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272391/how-western-companies-sneakily-sold-chemical-weapons-components-to-syria-and-iraq<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64450_article_main/w/240/h/300/protesters-mark-the-one-year-anniversary-of-a-chemical-weapons-attack-in-syria.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><div class="section-content"><div class="section-inner layoutSingleColumn"><p class="graf--p graf--first">Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.</p><p class="graf--p is-withNotes">But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria &mdash; in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.</p><p class="graf--p">German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.</p><p class="graf--p">Dual-use chemical complicate...</p></div></div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272391/how-western-companies-sneakily-sold-chemical-weapons-components-to-syria-and-iraq">More</a>By Paul MutterFri, 21 Nov 2014 08:50:00 -050010 things you need to know today: November 21, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272424/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-21-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272424/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-21-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64462_article_main/w/240/h/300/obama-makes-the-case-for-his-executive-order-on-immigration.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Obama details his immigration reform orders</strong><br />President Obama announced Thursday that he was using his executive powers to unilaterally impose immigration reform despite gridlock over the issue in Congress. In a primetime address, Obama said he would enact measures deferring the deportation of four million undocumented immigrants, allowing undocumented parents of U.S. citizens who have been in the country five years to apply for legal residency, but with no path to citizenship. Republicans vowed to fight the moves, saying Obama had overstepped his authority by acting alone. [<em>The Washington Post...</em></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272424/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-21-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Fri, 21 Nov 2014 07:58:00 -0500Why Middle Eastern governments must stop playing the shari'a cardhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272038/why-middle-eastern-governments-must-stop-playing-the-sharia-cardhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272038/why-middle-eastern-governments-must-stop-playing-the-sharia-card<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64313_article_main/w/240/h/300/parts-of-iraq-are-becoming-increasingly-reliant-on-sharia.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>If you're a woman living in Raqqa, Syria, you already had enough to worry about: Your government recently lost a quarter of the country to the Islamic State. Basic resources like food, water, and electricity are scarce. U.S. air strikes in the region are on the rise.</p><p>You can now add something else: adhering to strict Islamic dress codes. Beginning last month, the local government has tasked a new, all-female sharia police unit, the al Khansaa brigade, with cracking down on civilian women who do not abide by ultra-strict versions of sharia law imposed by the Islamic State. The new restrictions...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272038/why-middle-eastern-governments-must-stop-playing-the-sharia-card">More</a>By Emily Schneider, Alliya Anjum Razavi, and Corri ZoliThu, 20 Nov 2014 08:34:00 -050010 things you need to know today: November 20, 2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272330/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-20-2014http://theweek.com/article/index/272330/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-20-2014<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64413_article_main/w/240/h/300/tallahassee-police-investigate-a-shooting-at-fsu.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>1. Three students injured in Florida State campus shooting</strong><br />A gunman wounded three students at a Florida State University library packed with up to 400 students studying for final exams Thursday morning, shortly after midnight. The gunman allegedly fired at police outside the library and was killed when they shot back. "Obviously everyone wants to know why," Tallahassee police Chief Michael DeLeo said. "That's the hard answer we're going to continue to investigate." [<em>Tallahassee Democrat</em>, <em>CNN</em>]</p><p >&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;&hellip...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272330/10-things-you-need-to-know-today-november-20-2014">More</a>By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>Thu, 20 Nov 2014 07:55:00 -0500Why you should care about the fate of Abenomicshttp://theweek.com/article/index/272282/why-you-should-care-about-the-fate-of-abenomicshttp://theweek.com/article/index/272282/why-you-should-care-about-the-fate-of-abenomics<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64393_article_main/w/240/h/300/shinzo-abe-won-a-general-election-on-a-mandate-to-grow-japans-economy.jpg?209" /></P><p>There were two important news stories out of Japan yesterday: The country slipped into a recession, and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called for snap elections. Abe himself said that the elections would be a referendum on "Abenomics," his controversial economic agenda that has been very good for the stock market but, perhaps, not so good for the rest of the economy. Abenomics serves as a potential blueprint for the sluggish economies of the eurozone and the United States, because Abenomics is a response to a problem that these countries now face. In other words, you should care what happens next.<br /><br />So...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272282/why-you-should-care-about-the-fate-of-abenomics">More</a>By <a href="/author/pascal-emmanuel-gobry" ><span class="byline">Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry</span></a>Thu, 20 Nov 2014 06:08:00 -0500Israeli and Palestinian leaders can't control the new wave of violence in Jerusalemhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272255/israeli-and-palestinian-leaders-cant-control-the-new-wave-of-violence-in-jerusalemhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272255/israeli-and-palestinian-leaders-cant-control-the-new-wave-of-violence-in-jerusalem<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64385_article_main/w/240/h/300/ultra-orthodox-jews-attend-the-funeral-of-one-of-the-victims-from-tuesdays-attack.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>JERUSALEM &mdash; Two Palestinian men stormed into a synagogue in Jerusalem on Tuesday, where they killed four rabbis and injured eight with knives, axes, and guns in the city's deadliest attack in years. A policeman died later of his wounds.</p><p>Witnesses described a chaotic scene during the 7 a.m. attack as the two gunmen first opened fire outside, then entered the building and began attacking worshippers. The attackers were shot dead minutes later by police.</p><p>Emergency workers said the slain victims lay outside in pools of blood, still wrapped in their prayer shawls.</p><p>"This will force all of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272255/israeli-and-palestinian-leaders-cant-control-the-new-wave-of-violence-in-jerusalem">More</a>By Gregg CarlstromWed, 19 Nov 2014 10:35:00 -0500