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water
August 15, 2014

Next time you open up your bottle of Arrowhead water, think about the drought-stricken state its contents came from.

As Mother Jones reports, a good amount of bottled water comes from drought zones. About 55 percent of it is spring water (including the brands Crystal Geyser and Arrowhead), which the EPA describes as groundwater collected "at the point where water flows naturally to the earth's surface or from a borehole that taps into the underground source." The other 45 percent (including Dasani and Aquafina) comes from the municipal water supply — treated tap water.

There are a few reasons why so much of the bottled water supply comes from a parched California. Some of the many brands that have set up shop in the Golden State have been there more than a century. "You have to remember this is a 120-year-old brand," Arrowhead's Jane Lazgin tells Mother Jones. "Some of these sources have long, long been associated with the brand." California also does not have groundwater regulation, meaning if a water company drills and finds water, they get to use it.

But there's also an obvious reason that companies continue shipping out water from states that are struggling to find enough: Profit. In 2012, companies produced about 10 billion gallons of water with sales of $12 billion. Catherine Garcia

music to my ears
9:25 a.m. ET
Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images

Dr. Dre announced on his radio show Saturday he will release his first new album in 15 years, Rolling Stone reports. Compton: A Soundtrack, which he's releasing exclusively on iTunes and Apple Music Aug. 7, will feature artists including Eminem, Kendrick Lamar, Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, and the Game.

"I kept it under wraps, and now the album is finished," he said. "It's bananas. It's an 'inspired by' album. It's inspired by Straight Outta Compton."

Dre called the album his "grand finale." Julie Kliegman

$$$$$
9:13 a.m. ET
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Puerto Rico defaulted Saturday, missing a $58 million debt payment on Public Finance Corporation bonds. Victor Suarez, the governor's chief of staff, said Friday the island only has enough money to operate until November if nothing is done to increase cash flow, Reuters reports.

Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla announced in June that Puerto Rico would need restructuring on an unpayable $72 billion in debt. The White House has said the U.S. will not bail out the territory. Julie Kliegman

flight 370?
7:46 a.m. ET
Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Officials said Sunday they found debris believed to be the door of an airplane on Réunion Island, a French territory in the Indian Ocean. The piece could offer more clues into the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 in March 2014, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Investigators found another piece of airplane debris on the island Wednesday. The wing section arrived in France on Saturday for observation, where Malaysian officials have confirmed it was from a Boeing 777 plane. Flight 370 is the only missing 777.

The airplane's door may help determine whether there's a connection between the debris and the missing plane, since it should have more distinct markings than the wing part. Julie Kliegman

global matters
August 1, 2015
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German Chancellor Angela Merkel will reportedly seek a fourth term in 2017, unnamed sources told German newspaper Der Spiegel. She's expected to officially announce her run in 2016, Politico reports.

Should Merkel win a fourth term, the first female chancellor would find herself right behind the longest-serving leaders in German history, Helmut Köhl and Otto von Bismarck.

There's no obvious successor in place and Merkel is popular in polls, so Politico reports her 2017 candidacy has been anticipated. Julie Kliegman

race in america
August 1, 2015
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The NAACP kicked off a 40-day march through the U.S. South on Saturday meant to highlight issues of racial injustice in the country, Reuters reports. The Journey for Justice organizers started with a civil rights rally in Selma, Alabama, a city key to the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

The march was sparked by the many recent instances of police officers killing unarmed black men, including Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York. 

"We can continue to be serially outraged, or we can engage in an outrageously patriotic demonstration with a commitment to bringing about reform in this country," NAACP President Cornell William Brooks said.

Marchers will conduct teach-ins in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, as they make their way to Washington, D.C., for a final rally Sept. 16. Julie Kliegman

strange species
August 1, 2015

For years, scientists thought Africa's golden jackals to be the same as Eurasian golden jackals. Only one problem: the African ones turned out to not be jackals at all, The Huffington Post reports.

In a new DNA study published Thursday in Current Biology, researchers concluded that what they thought were jackals are actually African golden wolves, the first new species of canine found in Africa in 150 years, according to The Guardian.

Consider the two species distant cousins. Julie Kliegman

Olympics
August 1, 2015

The World Health Organization asked the International Olympic Committee to conduct tests for viruses on the water in Rio de Janeiro, the site of 2016's summer games, The Associated Press reports. The move comes days after an AP investigation found high levels of viruses and bacteria from sewage in the city's water, where open-water swimming and boating events will be held for 1,400 athletes.

The international Sailing Federation will also run independent tests for viruses in the water. One unique feature of Rio playing host to the Olympics is that the boating events are set to be contested unusually close to the rest of the action, offering good publicity to those sports and their athletes. But the venue could change if the waters are deemed unsafe. Julie Kliegman

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