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August 7, 2014
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Fresh off a game-winning goal in last night's Major League Soccer All-Star Game, soccer superstar Landon Donovan has announced on his Facebook page that he will retire from professional soccer at the end of this season, his 14th in the MLS.

From Donovan's announcement:

I don't write these words lightly and this day carries mixed emotions for me. I am sad to leave a profession that has brought me so much joy. I will miss all of the teammates who helped me create so many incredible memories on-the-field, and who I have shared many wonderful experiences with off-the-field. I will miss my coaches, at both the club and national team levels, who have helped me develop throughout my career and helped make me the player I am today. However, after spending half my life as a professional soccer player, I also am excited to begin a new chapter and pursue other opportunities that will challenge me and allow me to grow as a person.

Donovan began his American professional career with the San Jose Earthquakes of the MLS in 2001 when he arrived there on loan from German club Bayer Leverkusen. The San Jose Earthquakes went to the MLS Cup Championships that season (and again in 2003). Donovan then made his way to the Los Angeles Galaxy in 2005, where he's stayed for nine years (spending a stint on loan with German club Bayern Munich and two with English Premiere League side Everton).

Donovan also represented the United States in international competition, joining the U17, U20, and U23 teams in addition to his time on the U.S men's national soccer team. Kimberly Alters

6:04 p.m. ET
Screenshot/Twitter/TheLeadCNN

Ted Crockett, a spokesperson for Alabama Republican Senate Candidate Roy Moore, really didn't want to answer a question Tuesday on whether Moore thinks homosexuality should be illegal. But CNN's Jake Tapper eventually nailed him down.

"Homosexuality is a sin in the biblical sense. That is where Roy Moore is in the state of Alabama," Ted Crockett initially responded. When the CNN host then asked if Moore thought that the Bible should be the law of the United States, the exasperated spokesman told him that America was founded on the Bible. "Jake you don't understand," Crockett said after Tapper brought up the Constitution's separation of church and state. Finally, Tapper asked, "Here's my question for you, sir: Does [Moore] think that homosexual conduct should be illegal? It's a yes or no question." Crockett held his mouth open and blinked before answering, "Probably."

Crockett, who is apparently unaware of the concept of irony, continued on to say, "We've got too many people that are winging it [in Washington]. They're fooling with women they shouldn't be fooling with. They ought to love their wives. Roy Moore loves his wife."

Crockett's boss has been accused of sexually assaulting teenage girls, dating teenage girls (which he did not exactly deny), and trolling Alabama malls to pick up teenage girls while in his 30s. FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver predicted Monday that Moore has about a 70 percent chance of winning Tuesday's special election for Alabama's Senate seat. Kelly O'Meara Morales

5:11 p.m. ET

The Olympic torch relay ceremony just had its most heavy metal moment in its more than 80-year history.

On day 41 of the torch relay, which begins in the original site of the ancient Olympics in Olympia, HUBO the humanoid robot walked briefly with the Olympic flame, for some reason. It then drilled a hole in a wall, smashed through it, and delivered the torch to its next carrier. In a nice human touch, HUBO got to pass the torch to his creator, professor Oh Jun-Ho, at the robot's place of birth, the Korean Advanced Institute of Science Technology.

HUBO probably never thought (if such a thought was possible) that the Olympic torch would end up in its robotic hands. After all, the humanoid robot was designed for responses to emergency and disaster situations, not torch-carrying. But now, HUBO the humanoid robot joins noted Terminator Arnold Schwarzenegger as the only other robot to have carried an Olympic torch.

Watch HUBO carry the Olympic flame below and try and not to get too freaked out by the other and much larger human-controlled robot that appears at 1:37 of the video. Kelly O'Meara Morales

3:48 p.m. ET

A bizarre, fast-moving rock with the "proportions of a giant cucumber" has entered our galaxy, becoming the first stony object of its sort ever observed zipping through the Milky Way, The Washington Post writes. As if the interstellar passerby wasn't exciting enough, extraterrestrial researchers are gearing up for what could be the observation of a lifetime — proof that intelligent life exists beyond our own little corner of the universe.

"The possibility that this object is, in fact, an artificial object — that it is a spaceship, essentially — is a remote possibility," explained the director of the Berkeley Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Research Center, Andrew Siemion.

Researchers have named the rock 'Oumuamua, the Hawaiian word for "messenger." 'Oumuamua's strange "behavior" is what has some researches thinking it could be more than just an ordinary quarter-mile-long cosmic pebble:

Planets and asteroids circle the sun on the same plane, like water swirling around a basin. 'Oumuamua dipped into the solar system from outside the plane, as if leaked from a cosmic faucet.

It is shaped strangely, too. Most asteroids of this size are spherical. This object has the proportions of a giant cucumber. In fact, Harvard University astronomer Avi Loeb recently told [Russian billionaire Yuri Milner] that 'Oumuamua has the optimal design of a vessel meant to travel through space, The Atlantic reported. [The Washington Post]

To get ready for the event, scientists announced that they will be pointing highly sophisticated radio telescopes at the space rock to pick up if it is using technology to reach its speeds of up to 196,000 miles per hour. The devices are so sophisticated, in fact, that "if an electronic device no more powerful than a WiFi router or telephone handset is transmitting on 'Oumuamua, the telescope will be able to sense it," the Post writes. Read more about the 'Oumuamua visitation here. Jeva Lange

2:07 p.m. ET
Leon Neal/Getty Images

One of the world's most popular dating apps just got a little bit creepier.

Tinder announced Tuesday that it's testing out a new feature letting users see more social media content from people they match with. The "Feed" — which is being tested in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada — is an updating timeline where users can see new Instagram posts, Spotify top artists, and new profile pictures from their Tinder matches. Engadget notes that the dating app already allows users to connect their Instagram and Spotify accounts to their Tinder profiles, but this new feed takes it a step further by creating something that resembles a Facebook News Feed filled with content posted by potential romantic interests (who, let's remember, you don't actually know yet).

If you don't want your matches to know about your life before you meet them, Tinder lets you manage which social media accounts and posts get linked to its feed. But once you allow it, Tinder users can interact with your social media content. As Tinder proclaims: "[G]ive Leilani a shout-out on her solid Boomerang skills, or let Zoe know the 'Best. Burger. Ever.' pic she just posted is your favorite too."

Tinder missed its most recent quarterly profit estimate, but the dating app is still profitable and was recently valued at $3 billion. The "Feed" is one of several new features Tinder has rolled out this year. In June, Tinder announced the creation of a subscription service that allows paying users to see who has "liked" their profile. And two weeks ago, the company introduced a machine learning tool that uses algorithms to show users new people that it thinks they will swipe right on. Tinder has over 50 million users, and the company recently promised to "blur lines between the physical and digital world for dating." Totally not creepy! Kelly O'Meara Morales

1:47 p.m. ET
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Sixty-one percent of Americans think Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore should be kicked out of the Senate if he wins the special election on Tuesday night, a new Politico/Morning Consult poll has found. A plurality of Republicans also agree that Moore should be removed, at 45 percent, while 29 percent think he should be allowed to serve in the Senate if he beats his Democratic opponent, Doug Jones.

Moore is accused of pursuing — and in one case, assaulting — teenage girls as young as 14. He has denied the claims, and been endorsed by President Trump and the Republican National Committee. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said he believes Moore's accusers and that the former judge "should step aside" in the race, and other Republican senators, including Sen. Cory Gardner (Colo.) and outgoing Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.), have suggested Moore should be expelled if he gets elected.

The divide across the American public is noticeably tied to gender, with half of Republican women thinking the Senate should expel Moore, whereas only 39 percent of Republican men say the same. Overall, 65 percent of American women and 56 percent of American men agreed Moore should be expelled if he wins Tuesday evening.

The poll surveyed 1,955 registered voters between Dec. 8-11 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 points. Read the full results at Politico. Jeva Lange

12:20 p.m. ET

Sassy and Roy Moore arrived in Gallant, Alabama, on Tuesday to vote in the state's special election. Moore was voting, anyway; Sassy is a horse:

It is not the first time the former judge has opted for a zero emission ride to the polls — he also cast his vote via horseback in September during the GOP runoff election, although that time he was on his other horse, Sundance. Moore has ridden Sassy to vote before too, though, so you might say this wasn't exactly her first rodeo.

If elected, Moore — who stands accused of pursuing teenage girls as young as 14 — will presumably join the Capitol Hill riding club, which includes Vice President Mike Pence, Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt (R), Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma, and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Then again, Moore might not exactly be the type to ride in polite single-file:

Enjoy another look at Sassy, from afar. Jeva Lange

12:13 p.m. ET

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) came to the defense of her colleague Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday after President Trump tweeted that Gillibrand "begged" and "would do anything for" campaign donations.

Trump's online attack on Gillibrand came one day after the New York senator called for the president to resign over the numerous allegations of sexual assault made against him. Gillibrand and Warren (whom Trump delights in calling "Pocahontas") have both been vocal critics of the president. Political commentators consider both women to be potential frontrunners for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020.

There is however, one potential problem with Warren's defense of Gillibrand. The president's original tweet was criticized for its sexist implications, but Slate's Christina Cauterucci points out that Warren may have misinterpreted the meaning of "slut-shaming" in her tweet. Kelly O'Meara Morales

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