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August 7, 2014
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Some parents choose a baby name to honor a loved one, or because they like the meaning behind it. Others turn to a random website that suggests you name your kid after whatever website domains are still available, so you can screw your child up before even leaving the hospital.

Awesome Baby Name works like this: type in the baby's last name, and mark whether it's a boy, girl, or "whatever." Awesome Baby Name then trawls the internet to find what domain names are left; if your last name is something common like Jones or Lee, forget about it, your kid's going to be named Xyz or Zangela. The first 10 domain names that pop up are free, but to get 100 more it costs $3 (on sale from $9!). It's unclear just why a tiny person with no control over their bodily functions needs their own website, but Awesome Baby Name wants you to know that "domains go very quickly, so we recommend you get it as soon as possible."

The website says that at least 5,300 parents have used its services since it launched on Monday. I'm sorry, future Kasen Smith of KasenSmith.com (yep, that one's still available!). Maybe one day you can turn your site into a blog about how it feels to know your parents have iffy judgement. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018

CNN's Chris Cuomo interviewed President Trump's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski Thursday night, and tried multiple times to get him to answer a very specific question about Trump's immigration policy.

Cuomo said people are very confused by Trump's executive order regarding family separations at the border, and what happens now to children who are not with their parents. Lewandowski said "there's one problem at a time to solve," which set Cuomo off. "But he created the problem, Corey," the host said. "He came with the gasoline, he threw it on the house, he tossed the match, and he said 'let me grab a hose.'"

Cuomo then moved on to his next question — what is the Trump administration going to do to the employers who hire undocumented workers? People looking for jobs "get treated like a dog and thrown in a cage," Cuomo said, while the employers keep hiring with no consequences. Lewandowski dodged the question, and started listing off the names of people who are "dead because [of] illegal aliens." Cuomo continued to press Lewandowski for an actual answer to his question — watch the video below to find out if he ever succeeded. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018

Sure, Fox News goes out of its way to show its fealty and love to President Trump — it's Trump's No. 1 cable news channel, not just America's, after all. But is it really fair to compare Fox News to the state-run TV broadcaster of a murderous totalitarian regime that strictly prohibits outside news sources to the point that it created its own insular internet? The Daily Show did a little comparison shopping, creating a North Korea-Fox News "progagnda-off."

The main difference, you might conclude from these clips, is production quality and tone — the North Korea state broadcaster is perhaps a little manic-sounding for U.S. sensibilities. But Fox News has an actual news division, too, and unless North Korean state TV has its own Shep Smith, the comparison seems a little unfair. At the same time, two people familiar with preparations for the Trump-Kim Jong Un summit told The Washington Post, after watching some North Korean TV, Trump "talked about how positive the female North Korean news anchor was toward Kim" and "joked that even the administration-friendly Fox News was not as lavish in its praise as the state TV anchor." So stay tuned. Peter Weber

June 21, 2018
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Throughout the 2016 campaign and even after the inauguration, President Trump's lawyer Michael Cohen would regularly receive digital copies of National Enquirer articles and cover images related to Trump and his political opponents before they went to press, three people with knowledge of the matter told The Washington Post.

Trump is close to David Pecker, the CEO of American Media Inc., the parent company of the National Enquirer. The stories passed along about Trump were always positive, the Post reports, and if Cohen made any changes, it was to pick a more flattering photo. Trump, several people said, would pitch stories to Pecker and also saw them before they went to print, including an article about Hillary Clinton's health and another about former GOP presidential primary rival Dr. Ben Carson allegedly botching operations.

Sam Nunberg, a former Trump campaign adviser, told the Post that the Enquirer was "such a help to Trump during the primary and even the general" that is was basically free advertising. The company's chief content officer, Dylan Howard, denied that the Trump camp had a say in the articles, adding that if the stories ever were shared, "it was not at the behest of me or David."

In April, FBI agents raided the office and home of Cohen, and people with knowledge of the matter say they took his records related to AMI, Pecker, Howard, and payments made to women who say they had affairs with Trump. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018
Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

ABC has ordered 10 episodes of a Roseanne spinoff called The Conners, to start airing this fall, the network announced Thursday night.

The Roseanne revival had high ratings in its first season, and was canceled last month after star Roseanne Barr made a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett, a former adviser to President Barack Obama. Every lead actor from Roseanne, with the exception of Barr, will star in the spinoff. In a statement, ABC said Barr "will have no financial or creative involvement in the new series." Barr released her own statement, saying, "I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from Roseanne. I agreed to the settlement in order that 200 jobs of beloved cast and crew could be saved and I wish the best for everyone involved."

BuzzFeed News reports that the show will focus on the Conner family as they deal with "a sudden turn of events" that rocks them all. The Conners will air at 8 p.m. in the time slot left empty by Roseanne's cancelation. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

First lady Melania Trump is getting a lot of flak for a Zara jacket she wore going to and from a center holding detained immigrant children that read "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?"

Trump's communications director, Stephanie Grisham, took umbrage at the idea that anyone would find the message inappropriate. "It's a jacket," she said. "There was no hidden message. After today's important visit to Texas, I hope the media isn't going to choose to focus on her wardrobe." Well, everyone is focusing on it, including President Trump.

On Thursday evening, Trump tweeted: "'I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?' written on the back of Melania's jacket, refers to the Fake News Media. Melania has learned how dishonest they are, and she truly no longer cares!" As anyone who was ever a teenager knows, when you go around saying you don't really care about something, it means you actually do, and that goes double when you have it emblazoned on the back of your jacket.

So, what is it? Was there "no hidden message," as Grisham claims, or was this a blatant commentary on the "Fake News Media?" I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U? Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018
Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) announced Thursday evening that House Republicans are postponing until next week a vote on a so-called compromise immigration bill that would provide a pathway to citizenship for undocumented young immigrants and fund President Trump's border wall.

This was the second time GOP leadership decided to delay the vote; they were supposed to vote on their proposal Thursday, then Friday. Leaders did not have the 218 votes needed to pass the measure, and were pressured to postpone the vote by conservatives already opposed to the legislation, Politico reports. Catherine Garcia

June 21, 2018
AP Photo

Conservative columnist and political commentator Charles Krauthammer died Thursday, just weeks after he revealed that he had an aggressive form of cancer. He was 68.

Krauthammer wrote a syndicated weekly column for The Washington Post, which garnered him a Pulitzer Prize in 1987, and earlier this month he announced in a letter published in the Post that doctors told him his cancer had returned and he only had a few weeks left to live. "This is the final verdict," he wrote. "My fight is over." Krauthammer regularly appeared on Fox News, and over his career he wrote for outlets across the political spectrum, including Time, The New Republic, and The Weekly Standard.

Krauthammer was born in New York in 1950, and grew up in Montreal. During his first year studying at Harvard Medical School, he had a diving accident that severed his spinal cord. He is survived by his wife, Robyn, and son, Daniel. Catherine Garcia

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