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August 5, 2014
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Disgraced Biogenesis head Tony Bosch, whose now-defunct clinic allegedly distributed performance-enhancing drugs to pro athletes, surrendered early Tuesday morning to the Drug Enforcement Agency. An as-yet unspecified number of others involved in the clinic also turned themselves in as part of the DEA's Operation Strikeout.

The arrests come exactly one year after Major League Baseball announced the suspensions of a dozen players — including Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez — accused of taking banned substances obtained through the clinic.

Bosch has reportedly reached a deal to plead guilty to conspiracy to distribute steroids, according to ESPN. As ESPN's T.J. Quinn notes, Bosch has not only been tied to pro athletes, but clinic documents indicate he peddled the same substances to well-heeled private citizens and high-school athletes, too.

Though MLB originally came after Bosch with dubious extralegal tactics in its bid to unveil suspected drug cheats, the league eventually turned him into a star witness in its case against A-Rod. Jon Terbush

12:15 a.m. ET

He had her back after her knockout speech at the Democratic National Convention on Monday, and the first lady returned the favor on Wednesday.

"That's my man!" Michelle Obama tweeted after her husband finished his address. "Your truth, dignity, and grace reminds us what real leadership looks like. I am always proud of our @POTUS." Earlier in the night, the first lady also had a special message for Vice President Joe Biden (who during his DNC speech called her "incredible"): "To one of my favorite men in the world. Joe, thank you and Jill for all you've done for this country. Our love for you is deep. So proud!" Catherine Garcia

12:01 a.m. ET
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The Democratic National Convention closed out Wednesday night with Hillary Clinton and President Obama arm-in-arm onstage. After Obama wrapped up one of his last major speeches as president, Clinton surprised the convention by making her first in-person appearance. In a moment that solidified Obama's call for voters to keep his journey going, the two — the country's first black president and, possibly, its first female president — embraced, as cheers broke out on the convention floor.

Clinton will make her second — and much longer — appearance when she addresses the convention Thursday night. In the meantime, you can watch her surprise entrance, below. Becca Stanek

July 27, 2016
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President Obama gave the strongest endorsement possible of Hillary Clinton during the Democratic National Convention, telling the cheering delegates that he could state "with confidence" there has "never been a man or a woman — not me, not Bill, nobody — more qualified than Hillary Clinton to serve as president of the United States of America."

"Nothing truly prepares you for the demands of the Oval Office," Obama said. "But Hillary's been in the room. She's been part of the decision, she knows what's at stake in decisions." He recalled the tough fight Clinton put up during the 2008 election, and said she was doing "everything I was doing, but just like Ginger Rogers, it was backwards in heels." When she served as his secretary of state, Obama was able to have a "front row seat to her intelligence, her judgment, her discipline."

After going through some of the highlights of his presidency ("delivering justice to Osama bin Laden," ensuring that "health care is not a privilege for a few, it is a right for everybody") Obama rejected Donald Trump's fear mongering. "He's not really a plans guy, not really a facts guys, either," he said. "He calls himself a business guy; I know plenty of business men and women who achieved remarkable success without leaving a trail of lawsuits and unpaid workers and people who feel like they've been cheated. Does anyone really believe that a guy who spent his 70 years on this earth showing no regard for working people is suddenly going to become your champion? Your voice?" Trump is suggesting that "America is weak," but "America is already great," Obama said. "America is already strong. I promise you, our strength, our greatness, does not depend on Donald Trump."

The United States he knows is "full of courage and optimism," the president said, and he reminded people that "democracy isn't a spectator sport" and they must "get in the arena." Obama teared up at the end of his speech, and confessed that the "American people" have kept him going. "I see Americans of every party, every background, every faith, who believe that we are stronger together," he said, before calling on everyone to "reject cynicism and reject fear, to show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation." Catherine Garcia

July 27, 2016
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As the Democratic National Convention recounted President Obama's victories in office Wednesday night, one obstacle overcome was a little surprising: Rahm Emanuel. In the video introduction to the president's address, Rahm — formerly Obama's chief of staff and now mayor of Chicago — was shown trying to get in the way of Obama's signature health care bill becoming law. A voiceover said Emanuel argued the Affordable Care Act might threaten Obama's chances at reelection in 2012, but that the president selflessly overruled him. Emanuel ended up getting proven wrong — and, it seems, Obama wanted to remind him of that one last time. Becca Stanek

July 27, 2016

Unless you're one of his three children, Tim Kaine is not your dad — but he might as well be.

Hillary Clinton's mild-mannered running mate is the calm in the storm that is the 2016 election. During his speech at the Democratic National Convention, he was even-tempered, spoke with joy when talking about his family, and even when he got riled up and did an impression of Donald Trump, it made the Republican presidential nominee seem almost (key word: almost) chill. It wasn't difficult to imagine Kaine slipping into the role of your father, telling you he just wants the best for you, that he's proud of you no matter what, and of course he's happy to give you a ride to soccer practice — go get 'em, tiger! Twitter agreed: Catherine Garcia

July 27, 2016
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After formally accepting the Democratic Party's vice presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) made the case for why he trusts Hillary Clinton. "First, she's consistent," Kaine said, addressing the convention for the first. "She battled to put kids and families first since she was a teenager."

Kaine doubled down on that point, saying he would trust Clinton with the life of his son, who was just deployed overseas as a Marine. "You know who I don't trust? I wonder," Kaine said, before doing a quick imitation of Donald Trump:

While Clinton has a passion for "kids and families," Kaine said, Trump only has a passion for "himself." "Folks, you cannot believe one word that comes out of Donald Trump's mouth," he said. "Not one word." Becca Stanek

July 27, 2016
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Former New York City Mayor and Independent Michael Bloomberg appealed to Republicans and centrists to back Hillary Clinton in his speech Wednesday at the Democratic National Convention. "Whatever our disagreements may be, we must put them aside for the good of our country," Bloomberg said, calling Clinton "the candidate who can defeat a dangerous demagogue."

While Bloomberg said he, too, knows "what it's like to have neither party represent my views or values" and certainly didn't shy away from acknowledging his disagreements with Clinton, he said what is most important is electing a "sane, competent person."

"Join with me not out of party loyalty but out of love of country," Bloomberg said. "Your votes matter now." Becca Stanek

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