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August 4, 2014
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Every year, the Princeton Review polls 130,000 college students, asking them to weigh in on everything from the quality of their professors to the beauty of their campus.

But for all the variety of their findings, one category always generates the most attention: the biggest party school. This year, that dubious honor goes to New York's Syracuse University, which supplants 2013's list-topper, the University of Iowa. (Don't take it too hard, Hawkeyes; you're still at number two.)

"We are disappointed with the Princeton Review ranking, which is based on a two-year-old survey of a very small portion of our student body," said Syracuse University in a formal statement. "We do not aspire to be a party school."

By contrast, America's most sober campus is Utah's Brigham Young University — a title that the school, given its affiliation with the Church of Latter-Day Saints, is unlikely to lose anytime soon. Scott Meslow

1:01 p.m. ET

Even President Donald Trump's critics are happy to admit that things were at least peaceful Friday during the inauguration. Despite the fact that there are many other democratic nations around the world that do this exact same thing, Americans patted themselves on the back for once again not having a coup:

Not everyone is so impressed: "There is something unnerving about these reassurances, something overstated, even hysterical," writes The Atlantic's David Frum. "When a British prime minister loses the confidence of the House of Commons and must suddenly trundle out of 10 Downing Street (as some six dozen of them have done since the job was invented in the 1740s; a few more than once), nobody marvels on television how wonderful it is that he or she doesn't try to retain power by force of arms. Nobody in Denmark thinks it extraordinary when one party relinquishes power to another. Ditto New Zealand or Switzerland — all of them treat peaceful transfers of power as the developed world norm, like reliable electricity or potable water." Read his entire evaluation at The Atlantic, here. Jeva Lange

12:39 p.m. ET

President Donald Trump was sworn into office Friday in Washington, D.C., and after being administered the presidential oath by Chief Justice John Roberts he delivered his inaugural address to the nation. Standing on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol Building, Trump struck a populist tone reminiscent of the themes of his campaign. "This moment is your moment. It belongs to you," he said. "Jan. 20, 2017, will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again."

Trump lamented the state of U.S. education and manufacturing while sending a nationalist economic message, saying, "Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength." He also echoed his campaign slogan, promising that America would "start winning again — winning like never before," and he vowed to bring jobs and wealth back to the U.S.:

Standing in front of a dais full of elected officials, Trump criticized do-nothing politicians while simultaneously calling for unity around his movement. But observers noted his speech was notably angry for an inaugural address, which new presidents typically use to espouse themes of hope and bipartisanship:

Trump also called the state of gangs and drugs in the nation akin to "American carnage." But "that was the past. Now, we are looking only to the future," Trump said. "From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it's going to be only: America first." Kimberly Alters

12:22 p.m. ET

Moments after he was sworn into office, President Donald Trump declared Jan. 20, 2017, his Inauguration Day, "the day the people became the rulers of this nation again." Reviving the populist themes of his presidential campaign in his inaugural address, Trump said, "The forgotten people of this country will be forgotten no longer."

Trump declared that what "truly matters" is not whether the government is controlled by the Republican Party or the Democratic Party, but by "the people." The nation, Trump said, exists to "serve its people." Becca Stanek

12:20 p.m. ET

President Donald Trump painted an apocalyptic picture of the United States during his inaugural address, describing factories "scattered like tombstones across the land" and the ravages of "drugs" and "gangs."

"This American carnage stops right here and stops right now," Trump vowed.

If you had been mulling over "American carnage" for a band name, you're going to want to get on that pretty quick. Jeva Lange

12:10 p.m. ET

President Donald Trump vowed to "rebuild our country and restore its promise for all of our people" in his first words after being sworn in as commander-in-chief.

Trump stressed that "we are transferring power from Washington, D.C., and giving it back to you, the people."

"This is your country," Trump said. "What truly matters is not what party controls the government, but if our government is controlled by the people." Trump additionally thanked former President Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama for their "gracious aid throughout this transition." Jeva Lange

12:09 p.m. ET

Both President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence have now officially been sworn in as the United States' president and vice president, respectively. Watch Trump and Pence take their official oaths of office below. Becca Stanek

12:03 p.m. ET
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

On Friday, Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on the steps of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Minutes after Mike Pence was sworn in as vice president, Trump was administered the presidential oath of office by Chief Justice John Roberts, officially replacing Barack Obama as the nation's commander in chief. Trump then began his inaugural address at the West Front of the Capitol Building.

Earlier Friday, Trump attended a prayer service at St. John's Episcopal Church before heading to the White House, where he was welcomed by Barack and Michelle Obama at the North Portico.

Trump's inauguration drew thousands of supporters to the National Mall, though fierce protests broke out on the streets of D.C. and across the country. Kimberly Alters

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