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a game a day
August 4, 2014
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Don't tell your kids, but playing video games might actually be good for them. The University of Oxford published a new study Monday that revealed that in children 10 to 15 years old, playing video games daily — albeit for less than an hour each day — was actually associated with "higher life satisfaction and prosocial behavior and lower externalizing and internalizing problems."

The researchers rated participants in various categories, including how satisfied they were with their lives, how well they got along with others, and whether they exhibited signs of hyperactivity or inattention. The group that played video games for less than one hour each day showed the highest levels of "positive social interactions" and were more likely to indicate satisfaction with their lives.

Of course, moderation is the word here, as once gameplay time reached the one- to three-hour range, gamers showed no more positive qualities than their non-playing counterparts. And when playing time topped three hours, children actually exhibited negative effects.

Read the full study in the journal Pediatrics. Kimberly Alters

accidents
9:34 p.m. ET
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At least 24 members of a family were injured in North Carolina Saturday when the deck they were standing on collapsed.

The group — with members ranging in age from 5 to 94 — gathered on the 24-by-12-foot deck of their beach house rental to take a family photo, authorities said. Five people are still hospitalized, two in critical condition. In a statement, Emerald Isle town manager Frank A. Rush Jr. said preliminary findings suggest the collapse was due to deteriorated nails on the 29-year-old house. "Although Emerald Isle is a busy and popular tourism destination, it prides itself on its 'family beach image' and 'small-town atmosphere,' and an incident of this nature affects our entire community deeply," he said.

The deck fell at least 10 feet, Emerald Isle Fire Chief Bill Walker told the Los Angeles Times. "It was basically a one-story house that was built on pilings," he said. Rush said no complaints have been filed over the condition of the home, and state law says it is the responsibility of a rental property owner or manager to routinely inspect their properties. Catherine Garcia

This just in
9:04 p.m. ET
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The United States defeated Japan Sunday in the Women's World Cup final game, 5-2, giving the team its first World Cup win since 1999. Within the first 16 minutes of the game, Carli Lloyd scored three goals. Lauren Holiday also scored in the 14th minute and Tobin Heath in the 55th minute. In the 2011 Women's World Cup final, the U.S. lost to Japan on penalty kicks. Catherine Garcia

Don't try this at home
8:50 p.m. ET
Thomas Lhones/Getty Images

A 22-year-old man in Maine was killed Saturday night after setting off a firework on top of his head, authorities said.

Devon Staples of Calais was drinking with friends on the 4th of July when the incident took place, Stephen McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety, said. Staples died instantly. The firework was designed to launch the explosive out of a small tube into the air, The Boston Globe reports. This was the first fireworks-related death to take place in Maine since they became legal in 2012, McCausland said. Catherine Garcia

Greek debt crisis
4:26 p.m. ET
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Former Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras announced he was stepping down from his role as the head of the nation's conservative opposition party, New Democracy, on Sunday, Reuters reports. His statement came after it became increasingly clear the public voted against Greece taking the eurozone bailout deal, a decision likely to keep the economy in turmoil. With the majority of votes in, the Greek Interior Ministry shows about 61 percent voting "no" in the referendum.

"Our party needs a new start. As of today, I'm resigning from the leadership of New Democracy," he said in a televised statement. Julie Kliegman

Greece votes
4:06 p.m. ET
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About 60 percent of Greeks voted "no" on the eurozone bailout referendum Sunday, the Interior Ministry projected. That could lead to the nation being forced out of the eurozone, and a future of prolonged economic uncertainty. If finalized, the vote would support Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras' plea to turn down a deal from eurozone creditors.

The deal from the International Monetary Fund, European Union, and the European Central Bank would have come in exchange for tax increases and economic reform in Greece. The nation missed its Tuesday deadline to make a $1.8 billion loan payment to the IMF. Read more at The New York Times. Julie Kliegman

FIFA Under Fire
12:47 p.m. ET
Valeriano Di Domenico/AFP/Getty Images

FIFA President Sepp Blatter continues to maintain his innocence in the ongoing FBI investigation of soccer's governing body. The U.S. Justice Department indicted 14 officials on charges of corruption in May.

But Blatter, who is expected to be replaced at FIFA's helm as early as December, is afraid to leave Switzerland for fear of being arrested, the Los Angeles Times reports Blatter told German newspaper Welt am Sonntag.

"Not because the Americans have anything concrete against me, but because it would cause a public stir," he said. "Until everything has been cleared up, I am not going to take the risk of traveling."

Blatter won't even attend Sunday night's Women's World Cup final in Vancouver, Canada. Julie Kliegman

we'll never be royals
12:17 p.m. ET

Britian's Princess Charlotte is being christened Sunday at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Eastern England. The outing is the first public one for Prince William and Kate Middleton's family since Charlotte's birth in May.

Ahead of the ceremony, the couple named five godparents for baby Charlotte, none of whom are royalty. Charlotte is fourth in line to the British throne. Julie Kliegman

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