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August 4, 2014
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The film adaptation of mommy-porn staple Fifty Shades of Grey won't hit theaters until next year, but fans who wanted a more hands-on experience were slated to have another option: a new hotel in Vilafranca, Spain, which was originally set to open this week.

The Roissy Castle, a Fifty Shades-inspired hotel, would have had "20 rooms and four dungeons where guests can take part in BDSM (bondage, discipline, submission, sadism, and masochism) activities," says The Hollywood Reporter.

Alas, Fifty Shades of Grey fans will need to get their kicks elsewhere for now. Vilafranca's town council has successfully blocked the hotel's opening, arguing that the owner doesn't have the proper license to run a restaurant and hotel, and that the location is too close to a local chapel.

In retaliation, the hotel's owner says that he plans to sue the town hall, so eager Fifty Shades of Grey fans shouldn't consider themselves whipped just yet. Scott Meslow

1:19 a.m. ET
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Apple released an update to the iPhone and iPad operating system on Thursday, and you should probably download and install it as soon as is possible. About 10 days ago, researchers at Citizen Lab, a University of Toronto tech research organization, and mobile security firm Lookout discovered three large security holes in Apple's iOS that could give someone with the right tool access to your entire phone — they could "read text messages and emails and track calls and contacts," The New York Times said, "even record sounds, collect passwords, and trace the whereabouts of the phone user" — and you would never know anything was going on.

Citizen Lab was tipped off when Ahmed Mansoor, a human rights activist in the United Arab Emirates, forwarded some suspicious text messages he was receiving, and sure enough, the messages contained code that would grant an outsider access to an entire phone. The researchers traced the code back to a Israeli cyber-espionage outfit called NSO Group, which The Times calls "one of the world's most evasive digital arms dealers." NSO spokesman Zamir Dahbash told The Times that "the company sells only to authorized governmental agencies, and fully complies with strict export control laws and regulations," but did not say if UAE had purchased its products. Along with Mansoor, NSO tools have been used to target people in Yemen, Turkey, Mozambique, Mexico, and Kenya.

You can learn more about the exploit at Gizmodo, Motherboard, and The New York Times, but upgrade your system before you do — Apple says the new update patches those gaping holes. Peter Weber

12:34 a.m. ET
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When the Foster family moved into the El Dorado Hills neighborhood outside of Sacramento, California, they say they discovered a long-forgotten rule regarding the race of residents.

Clause 13 of the Lake Hills CC&R states as follows: "No person except those of the white Caucasian race shall use, occupy, or reside upon any residential lot or plot in this subdivision, except when employed in the household of a white Caucasian tenant or owner." Liese Foster told ABC 13 that while "everyone knows you can't enforce things like that," it still "sends a message." Some neighbors had no idea that the rule, on the books since 1961, existed, while others said they did know about it, but since non-whites live in the neighborhood and it's never been enforced, they pay it no mind.

Now that Brent Dennis is aware of the rule, he promises things will change. He is with the El Dorado Hills Community Services District, which handles rule enforcement for the community and more than 30 others. Dennis has worked there for four years, and said before he was approached by a local news station, he didn't know about the rule. He told KTXL that he has no clue why it was ever made, but said it has never been enforced and violates federal law, and members of his staff will work quickly to change it. Catherine Garcia

12:25 a.m. ET

Well, this is something you don't see every day. On Thursday's Tonight Show, Jimmy Fallon donned his Donald Trump persona and sang a song with the real Barbra Streisand, who looked unsure about the whole endeavor (she is an Oscar-winning actress). "We're going to sing a fantastic song, and together we're going to make duets great again," Fallon's Trump said. "That's if you can sing," Streisand shot back. "Can you?" "I sing all the best words," FalTrump said. The duet is Irving Berlin's "Anything You Can Do," from Annie Get Your Gun, but with slightly different lyrics ("I can build casinos, and deport Latinos," Fallon's Trump sings). If you had any doubt who Streisand is supporting in this election (and you didn't, right?), she laid out her cards in the song, and she got in a few good digs at Trump for good measure. Watch below. Peter Weber

August 25, 2016

It isn't exactly Bill Clinton playing saxophone on Arsenio Hall in 1992 (he also played a ballad), but Hillary Clinton's running mate, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), pulled out his harmonic on Thursday to do a little blues jam with Jon Batiste and Stay Human, Stephen Colbert's Late Show house band. Now, the harmonic isn't the world's, um, coolest instrument, but it's arguably a step up the hep ladder from the Batiste's melodica, and hey, Kaine isn't bad. If Hillary wins, maybe he and Bill can form a White House band. Watch below. Peter Weber

August 25, 2016

On Thursday, Donald Trump shared with CNN's Anderson Cooper his latest stance when it comes to immigration: No legal status for undocumented immigrants.

It was an apparent shift from comments he made just one day earlier during an appearance on Fox News, when he said "there's no amnesty, but we work with them," and announced that after spending the weekend meeting with Hispanic advisers, his policies "could certainly be softening, because we're not looking to hurt people." When speaking with Cooper, Trump said there is "no path to legalization unless they leave the country. When they come back in, then they can start paying taxes, but there is no path to legalization unless they leave the country and come back." His plan, he said, isn't "a softening. I've had people say it's a hardening, actually."

It's not clear, though, if Trump would try to deport immigrants who have lived in the U.S. peacefully for years, maybe with their family. "There is a very good chance the answer could be yes," Trump told Cooper. "We're going to see what happens."

Trump went on to say that on day one of his presidency, he'll give law enforcement authorization to deport the "bad dudes." When Cooper asked him how he might go about deporting the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S., Trump responded, "It's a process. You can't take 11 at one time and just say, 'Boom, you're gone.'" Catherine Garcia

August 25, 2016
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The Bolivian government confirmed that the country's deputy interior minister, Rodolfo Illanes, was beaten to death after being abducted by striking miners.

Before the government announced the death of Illanes, a radio station director told local media outlets he saw the body. Earlier Thursday, the government said Illanes, 56, had been abducted and was at risk of being tortured in Panduro, 100 miles from La Paz, Reuters reports. The striking miners are asking for changes to laws, including the right to work for private companies and better union representation, and the protests turned violent on Wednesday when a highway was blocked and two workers were shot and killed. The government says 17 police officers were wounded during the clash. (The article has been updated.) Catherine Garcia

August 25, 2016

Two nuns who worked as nurse practitioners at a medical clinic in rural Mississippi were found murdered in their home Thursday morning.

Maureen Smith, a spokeswoman for the Catholic Diocese of Jackson, said there were signs of a break-in at their home in Durant and their vehicle was missing. Authorities did not release a motive, and said it's unclear if their religion had anything to do with it. They also did not say if there are any suspects. The Rev. Greg Plata told The Associated Press police told him the women, identified as 68-year-old Sister Paula Merrill and Sister Margaret Held, were stabbed. "They were two of the sweetest, most gentle women you can imagine," Plata said. "Their vocation was helping the poor."

While working at the Lexington Medical Clinic, the nuns provided medical care for people who otherwise couldn't afford to go to the doctor. "They'll help anybody they can help," Lexington Medical Clinic manager Lisa Dew told AP. "They'll give you the shirt off their back." Merrill worked for more than 30 years in Mississippi. She was originally from Massachusetts, and joined the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth in Kentucky in 1979. Held was a member of the School Sisters of St. Francis in Milwaukee. Catherine Garcia

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