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July 29, 2014
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Chinese officials arrived unannounced Monday at four of Microsoft's offices in China, reportedly as part of an anti-trust investigation. On Tuesday, a Chinese regulator made an official statement that it is launching an anti-monopoly investigation into Microsoft Corp.

Reuters reports that the investigation was launched because officials suspect Microsoft has "not fully disclosed information about its Windows operating system and Microsoft Office software." China's State Administration for Industry & Commerce (SAIC) is investigating Microsoft's vice president and senior managers.

According to Reuters, the SAIC has already obtained emails and documents from Microsoft's computers and servers. The company has been suspected of violating anti-monopoly laws in China since June 2013.

As Quartz notes, China's domestic operating systems haven't been met with much success, and Microsoft is an "easy target." In May, China's government banned Windows 8 from government computers. While the investigation could lead to serious penalties for Microsoft, "regulatory pressure could result in lower costs for Chinese users, and also encourage Beijing's efforts to break foreign firms' stranglehold over crucial technology infrastructure," according to Quartz. Meghan DeMaria

6:52 a.m. ET

Ed Lee, San Francisco's mayor, died Tuesday morning, according to a statement from his office. He was 65, and no cause of death was given. "It is with profound sadness and terrible grief that we confirm that Mayor Edwin M. Lee passed away on Tuesday, Dec. 12, at 1:11 a.m. at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital," Lee's office said. "Family, friends, and colleagues were at his side. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife Anita, his two daughters, Brianna and Tania, and his family."

Lee, San Francisco's first Asian American mayor, took the job reluctantly in 2011, but was re-elected in 2015. London Breed, the president of the city Board of Supervisors, was named acting mayor, effective immediately. Peter Weber

6:38 a.m. ET
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On Fox News Monday night, former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer announced that he is writing a book about his brief and tumultuous tenure at the White House and on President Trump's presidential campaign. The book, The Briefing, will be published in July by Regnery Publishing, a leading publishing house for political and social conservatives.

"I've decided that it is incumbent on me to set the record straight," Spicer told Sean Hannity. "I looked back at the coverage of the campaign, the transition and the first six, seven months of this White House and realized that the stories that are being told are not an accurate represent [sic] of what President Trump went through to get the nomination, to transition to the White House and then his first six months in office."

"This isn't about White House gossip," Spicer told The Washington Examiner. "I can tell you from first-hand experience of the rampant hostility President Trump faces daily from the mainstream press, and I want the American people to have an opportunity to hear the truth they won't hear from mainstream media." So if you were hoping to read about Spicer from reporters hiding behind bushes, you might have to wait for Sarah Huckabee Sanders' inevitable tell-all. Peter Weber

6:00 a.m. ET
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The White House has been working to insulate President Trump from the #MeToo moment that has toppled prominent men at top levels of media, entertainment, and politics, given Trump's own rosters of women accusing him of sexual misconduct and his hot-mic bragging about assaulting women on the Access Hollywood bus. The White House, which pushed back against the women who repeated their stories of being harassed by Trump on Monday, is "warily" watching political careers crumble on Capitol Hill, The Associated Press reports, and Trump's advisers were "stunned Sunday when one of the highest-ranking women in the Trump administration broke with the White House line and said the accusers' voices 'should be heard.'"

That woman, United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, tepidly defended the women's right to speak out on CBS News, and her "comments infuriated the president, according to two people who are familiar with his views," AP says. "Trump has grown increasingly angry in recent days that the accusations against him have resurfaced, telling associates that the charges are false and drawing parallels to the accusations facing Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore."

Trump is reportedly telling people in private that the tornado of accusations of sexual assault against powerful men is spinning out of control, and "some outside Republicans close to the president said they are increasingly uneasy about his ability to withstand a revived spotlight on his behavior toward women," The Washington Post reports. "A number of Trump associates are also wary of the potential political costs if the president goes on a sustained attack against his accusers," while others are more sanguine. "They think he's invincible on this issue, because he survived the Access Hollywood tape," a Republican strategist close to the White House told the Post. "He was literally caught on tape saying he does this — it was a big deal — and he still won." Peter Weber

5:16 a.m. ET

Stephen Colbert started Monday's Late Show by mocking the man who tried to set off a bomb in the subway station near New York City's Port Authority terminal Monday morning. "Luckily, none of the bystanders were seriously hurt, and the police got the guy," he said. And Colbert had a message for the 27-year-old Pakistani bomber from Brooklyn: "Seriously? You tried to terrorize New York Subway commuters? Nice try. New York commuters don't even flinch when the subway breakdancers kick two inches away from their face. They have to battle rats for the seat."

"Now you're going to jail for a long, long, long time," Colbert said, "and all New Yorkers want to know is: Does that mean your apartment is free, and is it rent-controlled?"

Colbert noted that several of the women who've accused President Trump of sexual assault are back in public, then spent a few minutes going over a New York Times report of Trump's daily battle in the White House. Trump is upset about Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into his campaign's ties to Russia, but he reportedly shrugs it off, telling people, "That's life," Colbert said. "Yes, it's life, but you could plead that down to 30 years if you rat out Don Jr."

The Times also said Trump watches 4-8 hours of TV a day, and "hate-watches" CNN's Don Lemon — things Trump denied in a tweet on Monday, which Colbert read. But given Trump's fixation on TV, it's no surprise that before taking office, he reportedly told aides to think of "each presidential day as an episode in a television show in which he vanquishes rivals," Colbert said. He suggested some titles, including Grabs Anatomy.

The Late Show also mocked up a Trump family sitcom, Meet the Vanquishers, that gets a little dark at the end. Watch below. Peter Weber

4:17 a.m. ET

Tuesday is the big election in Alabama, with either Roy Moore or Doug Jones being sent to the Senate. On Monday night's Jimmy Kimmel Live, Kimmel said he did not understand why Moore is slightly favored to win the race, given his alleged predatory behavior toward teenage girls and related ban from the mall. "Maybe it's me, but if you aren't allowed to set foot inside a Hot Topic store, you shouldn't be allowed in the Senate of the United States," Kimmel said.

"A group that backs President Trump sent a 12-year-old girl to interview Roy Moore — for real," Kimmel said. "I don't know if the idea was to prove he could sit next to a young girl without hitting on her, but in any event, with this young lady at least, Judge Moore was a perfect gentleman." Well, until the end, in this version of the interview. "Obviously we faked that, but if he had done it, they'd still defend him," Kimmel said. He ended with a joke about Trump's first choice in the race being Jared from Subway.

"Roy Moore supporters spent the weekend going door to door, just like Roy Moore has to do when he moves into a new neighborhood," Stephen Colbert said on The Late Show, continuing the hebephilia jokes. He also found the interview with a 12-year-old girl a puzzling choice. "This is the worst matchup for an interview since they sent that honey-glazed ham to interview Chris Christie," he said. Still, if most Republicans in Congress are less than thrilled with Moore, Trump has gone all-in, and that's not surprising, Colbert said. "They both have a deep love of country — the country's Russia, but still." He played a recent video of Moore trashing the U.S., lauding Russia's Vladimir Putin, and saying a phrase in Russian that Colbert had a novel translation for. Watch below. Peter Weber

2:33 a.m. ET

No American infant has done more than Billy Kimmel to thwart this year's health-care overhaul envisioned by Republicans, and Jimmy Kimmel introduced his son on Monday's Kimmel Live, after taking last week off for Billy's second heart surgery. "Daddy cries on TV but Billy doesn't, it's unbelievable," he said, after tearing up. Billy is doing well, Kimmel added, but the health of about nine million U.S. children is at risk "because of something you probably never heard of, it's called CHIP," or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

The federal program, which insures about one in eight children, had always had strong bipartisan support, Kimmel said. "Overwhelmingly, Democrats and Republicans supported it, until now. Now, CHIP has become a bargaining chip, it's on the back burner while they work out their new tax plans, which means parents of children with cancer and diabetes and heart problems are about to get letters saying their coverage could be cut off next month. Merry Christmas, right?"

Congress let funding for CHIP expire 10 weeks ago, for the first time since it was created. "Imagine getting that letter, literally not knowing how you'll be able to afford to save your child's life," Kimmel said. "This is not a hypothetical — about 2 million CHIP kids have serious chronic conditions." He said he's disgusted with Washington's priorities, and urged viewers to demand their senator and House representative "take a break from tax cuts for a minute and fully fund CHIP immediately." He provided the number. "If these were potato chips they were taking away from us, we would be marching on Washington with pitchforks and spears right now," Kimmel joked.

Kimmel also reminded everyone that Friday is the deadline to sign up for the Affordable Care Act. "ObamaCare is not dead," he said. "It's very much alive," and that includes the subsidized plans and the penalty for not having health insurance. Peter Weber

2:04 a.m. ET

During a rally for Doug Jones in Birmingham on Monday, Alabama native Charles Barkley urged voters in the state to support the former federal prosecutor in his bid to become the first Democratic Senator to represent the state since the 1990s.

"At some point, we got to stop looking like idiots to the nation," the NBA and Auburn University legend said. "I love Alabama, but at some point we got to draw a line in the sand and show we're not a bunch of damn idiots." Jones' opponent, Republican Roy Moore, has espoused controversial views on many topics and been accused by several women of groping them when they were teenagers and he was in his early 30s, and Barkley said he's "embarrassed" that Moore is even on the ballot. "If somebody told you guys, 'Put this election in a movie script' … you would throw it in the trash," he added. "You'd say there's no way possible this other dude could be leading in any polls."

Jones made a gentler appeal, telling supporters the election is "going to be one of the most significant in our state's history, and we've gotta make sure that at this crossroads in Alabama's history, we take the right road." Catherine Garcia

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