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July 15, 2014

If Pokemon nostalgia has been getting the best of you lately, never fear: A Pikachu-themed pop-up cafe in Tokyo is serving an adorable teriyaki burger that resembles the classic Pokemon character.

The appropriately named Pikachu Cafe will serve a variety of other foods, including Pikachu beef curry and a mysterious parfait. The cafe is part of a promotion for the new Pokemon the Movie XY.

Eataku reports that the Pikachu Cafe will be open from July 19 to August 31 as part of a Pokemon the Movie XY exhibition in Roppongi Hills in Tokyo. The cafe's opening coincides with the film's Japan release on July 19. (The film does not currently have a release date in the U.S.)

Take a look at the Pikachu burger below. --Meghan DeMaria

12:07 p.m. ET
DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images

After Donald Trump called Texas Sen. Ted Cruz a "pussy" on the campaign trail Monday for his stance on waterboarding, he played off the inflammatory comment as just a crowd having a good time. "We were all just having fun," Trump said Tuesday on MSNBC's Morning Joe, clarifying that he was simply repeating what a supporter shouted out during the rally so "everybody could hear."

Making off-the-cuff remarks and apologizing later isn't a new strategy for the outspoken real estate mogul. Here, five other times Trump has made a controversial comment and then later cast it as nothing but a joke. Becca Stanek

The issue: Cruz's hesitation on whether he would support waterboarding
Trump's comment: "She just said a terrible thing. You know what she said? Shout it out, 'cause I don't want to. Okay, you're not allowed to say — and I never expect to hear that from you again — she said... he's a pussy."
The excuse: "We were all just having fun. I was just repeating what she said so everyone could hear. I was doing everybody a favor. I got a standing ovation [and] the place went wild. You're talking about close to 5,000 people. It was a great moment. The world is politically correct."

The issue: His unshakeable popularity with voters
Trump's comment: "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters."
The excuse: "That comment was said with me laughing and thousands of other people laughing. It was said as a joke — obviously it was a joke."

The issue: Climate change
Trump's comment: "The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive."
The excuse: "Well, I think the climate change is just a very, very expensive form of tax. A lot of people are making a lot of money. I know much about climate change. I'd be — received environmental awards. And I often joke that this is done for the benefit of China. Obviously, I joke. But this is done for the benefit of China, because China does not do anything to help climate change. They burn everything you could burn; they couldn't care less. They have very — you know, their standards are nothing. But they — in the meantime, they can undercut us on price. So it's very hard on our business."

The issue: His daughter, Ivanka
Trump's comment: "Yeah, she's really something, and what a beauty, that one. If I weren't happily married and, you know, her father..."
The excuse: "I said on a certain show — my daughter's a beautiful young woman — so I said, and I said it joking, everybody laughed, everybody laughed. I said, 'My daughter's so beautiful that if I weren't married, etc., etc. I'd be dating her.' Cute. It was cute. Everybody laughed... The next day [the headline was] 'Trump Wants to Date His Daughter.'"

The issue: Trump's treatment of women
Trump's comment: Fox News debate moderator Megyn Kelly referenced Trump's past remarks about women during the first GOP debate, asking him to explain why he has called women "fat pigs," "dogs," "slobs," and "disgusting animals."
The excuse: "I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct. Frankly what I say — and oftentimes, it's fun; it's kidding; we have a good time — what I say is what I say."

11:52 a.m. ET

Whatever happened to predictability? It's right here in the new trailer for Fuller House, which premiered exclusively on Ellen today (skip ahead to around 2:30):

This new trailer, which is the first to contain actual footage from the Netflix series, alternates between meta-references to how long it's been ("Damn, we all still look good!") and clumsy callbacks to the original Full House ("How rude," "Cut. It. Out," and "Have mercy!" uttered within the span of about eight seconds). You can say this for Fuller House: It's coming back in a way that feels totally in line with the quality of the original series.

Fuller House premieres on Feb. 26. Scott Meslow

11:44 a.m. ET
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Obama unveiled his eighth and final budget plan Tuesday. The $4.1 trillion budget proposal for fiscal 2017 — which starts Oct. 1, just months before Obama leaves office — focuses on progressive issues including clean energy, education, and Medicaid and requests $19 billion for a new cybersecurity initiative.

The proposal seeks to raise an additional $2.6 trillion in taxes over the next 10 years by hiking taxes on big banks and the wealthy. Revenue is projected to increase by $308 billion in the next fiscal year and spending is estimated to increase by $196 billion.

Even before the plan was sent to Congress Tuesday, Republicans vowed to reject it. Becca Stanek

11:26 a.m. ET

If Donald Trump didn't talk the way he talks, would he get the support he gets? Almost certainly not.

"He wants to sound macho," John Baugh, a linguistics professor at Washington University, told the Washington Post. "As part of his whole tough-guy persona, he adopts almost a working-class style of speech."

Nicole Holliday, a linguist studying at New York University, agrees. "Traditionally, the New York City accent has been stigmatized as rough and not necessarily intelligent," she explains. "But people do perceive it as authoritative. So he's got an accent that people don't like, but that they find credible. Trump sounds like he knows what he’s talking about, because of his accent."

But the best way to understand how Trump's accent affects his supporters is to hear his words without it, as in this video where comedian Peter Serafinowicz dubbed Trump with a formal, Transatlantic accent.

"What if Donald Trump had elocution lessons?" the video description asks. Well, probably he wouldn't have a campaign. Bonnie Kristian

10:51 a.m. ET

On the campaign trail in New Hampshire on Monday, Bill Clinton implied his wife's candidacy is cramping his style as a freewheeling ex-president.

"The hotter this election gets, the more I wish I were just a former president and just for a few months not the spouse of the next one," he said. "Because, you know, I have to be careful what I say."

"Tonight my job is to introduce Hillary," he later added. "Sometimes when I'm on a stage like this, I wish we weren't married. Then I could say what I really think."

The former president has lately been on the attack against Clinton's competitor in the Democratic primaries, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). While it is normal for a candidate's spouse to serve as a surrogate on the campaign trail, Bill Clinton's own political and personal history has made his role more complicated. Bonnie Kristian

10:20 a.m. ET

At Hillary Clinton's campaign event Tuesday in Hudson, New Hampshire, some attendees, while not necessarily Feeling the Bern, weren't necessarily feeling Hillary so much, either. Seated behind Clinton, members of the crowd sported supremely unenthusiastic campaign gear on the day of the state's primary election. The shirts, emblazoned with the dying whimper of the rallying cry, "Settle for Hillary," certainly get the point across:

Ouch indeed. Stephanie Talmadge

10:17 a.m. ET
DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images

Before Hillary Clinton was railing on big banks in a race for the Democratic presidential nomination against notoriously anti-Wall Street candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), she was getting paid by the big banks to give talks. Now, those private talks are threatening to make a second — and very public — appearance as the push grows for Clinton to release transcripts.

While some argue that the remarks are nothing but the "boilerplate, happy talk that highly paid speakers generally offer to their hosts," others worry that Clinton's speech, if released, could easily be taken out of context by Sanders, who has already been slamming her for her Wall Street connections.

According to one attendee at Clinton's October 2013 speech to Goldman Sachs executives and tech industry leaders, Clinton's remarks then were a far cry from what she's saying on campaign trail now. "It was pretty glowing about us," the attendee told Politico of the speech. "It's so far from what she sounds like as a candidate now. It was like a rah-rah speech. She sounded more like a Goldman Sachs managing director." Clinton, Politico reports, got $225,000 for the talk, during which she not once criticized Goldman or Wall Street over the financial crisis.

While the question of whether the release will happen remains up in the air, the attendee at Clinton's 2013 speech is pretty confident it won't. "It would bury her against Sanders," the attendee told Politico. "It really makes her look like an ally of the firm."

Read the full story over at Politico. Becca Stanek

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