Riverdale Requiem
July 15, 2014
Archie Comics

After 73 years on this earth, Archie Andrews is dying on Wednesday, taking a bullet meant for a friend, Kevin Keller. Keller, an openly gay U.S. senator whose big issue is gun control, is targeted by an assailant whose identity Archie Comics is keeping a secret until the latest issue of Life With Archie — the version of the long-running Archie comic that follows the Riverdale gang as adults — hits the stand Wednesday.

Archie debuted in 1941 as a wholesome teenager, and some people are probably surprised that he is still around, much less a grown-up in the Life With Archie series. Chris Cummins, the self-proclaimed "resident Archie expert" at Den of Geek, notes that though Archie is about to die, his teenage self will live on in other iterations of the Archie story. So might writer Paul Kupperberg's efforts to make the Archie universe's "archetypal characters into realistic and relatable figures dealing with real world problems like gun violence," Cummins adds, before eulogizing:

Not to be too grandiose, but this demise is a fitting and tonally perfect tribute to a character who has always put his friends first. This is a publicity stunt for sure, but one with heart that will have permanent ramifications. [Den of Geek]

Archie isn't the only comic book character to meet an early end, but as Archie Comics publisher Jon Goldwater notes, he's perhaps the first non-superhero comic hero to be killed off. "When you wound him, he bleeds," Goldwater tells The Associated Press. "We hope by showing how something so violent can happen to Archie, that we can — in some way — learn from him." Peter Weber

nepal earthquake
12:44 a.m. ET
Omar Havana/Getty Images

In the days since a 7.8-magnitude quake struck Nepal on Saturday and killed more than 4,300 people, dozens of aftershocks above a 4.5-magnitude have hit as well, and the U.S. Geological Survey warns that there is a better than 50-50 chance of another 6.0 quake or higher taking place in the next week and the next month.

The USGS forecast is based on where the earthquake took place — in this case, a deep boundary between colliding continental plates, NPR reports. It released stress that had building up for 150 years, triggering smaller quakes near the epicenter. "What's happening, particularly for these more remote aftershocks, is they are striking on the neighboring faults," Ross Stein, scientist emeritus at the USGS, told NPR, "and those neighboring faults could rupture in subsequent large earthquakes."

There is a 1-2 percent chance in the next few years that an aftershock could hit again in the area that is larger than Saturday's quake. "It's kind of a cruel part of aftershocks that we cannot depend on them getting smaller," Stein said. "They just get less and less frequent with time." Catherine Garcia

Quotables
12:04 a.m. ET
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said during a news conference late Monday night that 15 police officers were injured, six seriously, earlier in the day, although their injuries are not expected to be life-threatening.

The officers were hit by flying debris, including rocks, bottles, and sticks. "This is not protesting, this is not your First Amendment rights," he said. "This is criminal acts." He added he was "disappointed in the fact the damage has been done to these communities" and "disappointed we cannot be more responsible." He said the violence is embarrassing to the "beautiful" city of Baltimore, and asked that parents "take control of your kids." Catherine Garcia

Fires
April 27, 2015

In East Baltimore on Monday night, a community center and senior housing complex still under construction went up in flames, and authorities say they do not know if it is linked to the rioting across the city.

A spokesman for the mayor's office told WBAL-TV that the fire destroyed the Mary Harvin Transformation Center, which is run by a community-based organization that supports youth and families. Firefighters arrived at the three-alarm fire at 8:49 p.m., and the flames were visible from blocks away. About 60 members of the Southern Baptist Church located across the street watched as the fire engulfed the structures, many sobbing and asking aloud how this could happen.

The project consisted of the community center and about 60 affordable housing units for senior citizens, and has been in development since 2006, The Baltimore Sun reports. The center was to be used for events, educational programs, and employment training. Catherine Garcia

RIP
April 27, 2015
David Livingstone/Getty Images

Jayne Meadows, the award-winning actress and TV personality who often appeared alongside her husband Steve Allen, died Sunday of natural causes at her home in Encino, California. She was 95.

Meadows was born in China while her parents were missionaries, and she started in show business more than six decades ago, People reports. Meadows performed on Broadway stages, starred in movies, and was a regular panelist on I've Got a Secret. She also won the Susan B. Anthony Award for her one-woman show, Powerful Women in History. Meadows was married to Allen for 46 years until his death in 2000. She was also the sister of the late Audrey Meadows, who starred as Alice Kramden on The Honeymooners.

In an email to Entertainment Tonight, her son, Bill, wrote, "She was not only an extraordinarily gifted actress who could move audiences from laughter to tears and back again all in once scene, but she was the greatest story teller I have ever known and I will miss her endlessly fascinating and frequently hilarious anecdotes about her life and the many brilliantly talented people she worked with and befriended along the way." Catherine Garcia

happening now
April 27, 2015

During a news conference Monday night, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said he declared a state of emergency at the request of Baltimore officials, adding that he did not make the decision "lightly," as the "National Guard represents the last resort."

Hogan said the people of Baltimore "deserve peace and safety in their community," and the state will "not tolerate" the "roving gangs" who are to blame for the violence. The governor said he is sending 500 state troopers to Baltimore and is requesting as many as 5,000 officers from neighboring states, with Maryland National Guard Adjutant Gen. Linda Singh stressing during the news conference that it is "not martial law."

Once night fell, looters hit the Mondawmin Mall, a Save-A-Lot, and a Rite Aid in Bolton Hill, and a new senior center was set on fire, The Baltimore Sun reports. A total of 27 people have been arrested so far, police said, and Baltimore city officials announced that school has been canceled for Tuesday. Catherine Garcia

warnings
April 27, 2015
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Police officers across the U.S. are on high alert after Baltimore police received what they say is a "credible threat" targeting all law enforcement officers.

In a statement, Baltimore Police said they received information that members of different gangs, including the Bloods, Crips, and Black Guerrilla Family, have "entered into a partnership" to "take out" police, and "law enforcement agencies should take appropriate precautions to ensure the safety of their officers." Spokesman Capt. Eric Kowalczyk would not elaborate on how the information was received or why it is considered credible, The Baltimore Sun reports, and would not say if it is connected to the Freddie Gray demonstrations. In Los Angeles, the threat is being taken seriously, and officers were ordered to ride in pairs together. Catherine Garcia

This just in
April 27, 2015
Alex Wong/Getty Images

On Monday evening, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced during a news conference that a citywide curfew of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. will start on Tuesday, and will be extended as necessary after one week.

The mayor said that once the curfew goes into effect, everyone has to be off the streets unless it's a "medical emergency or you're going to work," and reminded people that there is a juvenile curfew of 9 p.m. that will be strictly enforced. Rawlings-Blake then turned her attention to the rioters, saying there is a "very clear difference" between the peaceful protesters "who wish to seek justice, those who seek to be heard and want answers," and the "thugs who only want to incite violence and destroy our city." Rawlings-Blake, a lifelong resident of Baltimore, added that "too many people have spent generations building up this city for it to be destroyed by thugs who in a very senseless way are trying to tear down what so many have fought for, tearing down businesses, tearing down and destroying property, things that we know will impact our community for years."

A police official also stated during the news conference that 15 police officers were injured by flying debris thrown by rioters, and two are still hospitalized. He said that over the next few days, officials will look over video footage to identify the perpetrators. Catherine Garcia

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