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July 12, 2014
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Angela Merkel made her feelings toward Washington clear in an interview on German broadcaster ZDF today, reports Reuters.

"We are not living in the Cold War anymore," Merkel said. "We should concentrate on what is essential."

Germany's government told Berlin's CIA station chief to leave the country on Thursday, in the wake of new allegations of U.S. spying in the country. Of two suspected spies discovered by German officials, one reportedly worked for German foreign intelligence, while the other operated within the country's defense ministry.

"It is not about how angry I was (over the new allegations)," Merkel said today. "For me, it is a sign that we have fundamentally different conceptions of the work of the intelligence services…The important thing is to show how we view things…and it is not a co-operative partnership when such things take place."

The latest revelation comes a year after documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden showed widespread surveillance on Germany by U.S. agents — even allegations that Merkel's personal phone had been bugged. Sarah Eberspacher

10:57 a.m. ET
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Two more women have accused Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) of groping their butts, The Huffington Post reported Wednesday.

The new allegations come days after radio host and model Leeann Tweeden said Franken kissed and groped her during a 2006 USA tour, and another woman, Lindsay Menz, said Franken squeezed her buttocks while they posed for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010.

The two new accusers spoke on the condition of anonymity, and said they did not know about each other's stories. Franken told HuffPost: "It's difficult to respond to anonymous accusers, and I don’t remember those campaign events." Harold Maass

10:28 a.m. ET
Screenshot / Twitter / The Washington Examiner

Speaking from his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida Thursday morning, President Trump offered words of gratitude and praise to the country's troops stationed abroad.

"For each of you I know it's hard to be away from home at this time of the year," Trump said via video, touting — on the plus side — the "great economy" the troops will eventually return home to. "When you come back you're going to see with the jobs and companies coming back into our country."

"Now we're working on tax cuts, big fat beautiful tax cuts," he continued. "And hopefully we'll get that and then you're really going to see things happen."

Before thanking the military families, Trump offered this last assurance: "We totally support you. In fact, we love you, we really do." Lauren Hansen

9:37 a.m. ET
MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar and Bangladesh signed an agreement on Thursday to allow an unspecified number of Rohingya Muslims, who fled across the border to escape violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state, to return home.

More than 620,000 Rohingya have sought refuge in Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when an army crackdown started in response to attacks on a police post by Rohingya insurgents. Bangladesh said the first repatriations would start in two months.

The news came a day after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson referred to the violence against the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar as "ethnic cleansing." Harold Maass

8:21 a.m. ET
MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images

Emmerson Mnangagwa, who served as Zimbabwe's vice president until ousted leader Robert Mugabe fired him on Nov. 6, will chair his first meeting as head of Zimbabwe's ruling Zanu-PF party Thursday and will be sworn in as the new president Friday, the speaker of the country's parliament announced Wednesday.

Mnangagwa's firing had triggered the chain of events that led to Mugabe's forced resignation Tuesday. Mnangagwa's ascension marks the country's first transfer of power since independence in 1980.

Mnangagwa returned to Zimbabwe Wednesday, after fleeing for safety, and addressed the public from the ruling party's headquarters. He said the military's intervention was the start of a "new democracy," one that required all Zimbabweans to work together to turn the country around. "We want to grow our economy, we want jobs, jobs, jobs," he said. Lauren Hansen

7:27 a.m. ET
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In 2015, after a sexually explicit, mainly online relationship with a woman ended, Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) threatened to report the woman to the Capitol Police, according to a recording obtained by The Washington Post. Barton had reportedly sent the woman sexually explicit photos, videos, and messages over the course of their relationship, which began on Facebook in 2011.

The woman, who spoke to the Post on the condition of anonymity, recorded the 2015 conversation in which Barton confronted her about communications she had with other women connected to Barton. "I am ready if I have to, I don't want to, but I should take all this crap to the Capitol Hill Police and have them launch an investigation," he said, according to the recording.

On Wednesday, Barton apologized to his constituents after naked photos of him circulated on social media. In a statement, Barton, who is the longest-serving member of Congress from Texas, said he had sexual relationships "with other mature adult women" while separated from his second wife, before their divorce in 2015. "I am sorry I did not use better judgment during those days," he said. But Barton, who has reportedly hired a crisis communications firm, also said that he had suffered a potential crime over the released lewd photos. In Texas, it is a misdemeanor to intentionally publicize images or videos of someone's genitals or sexual activity without consent. Barton said the Capitol Police may be launching an investigation. Lauren Hansen

November 22, 2017
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In their quest to cut taxes while not running up huge deficits, Senate Republicans have had to find creative ways to save money in their forthcoming tax reform bill. Although some estimates say that the Republican tax bill would add $1.8 trillion to the federal debt over 10 years, you can rest assured that the Republican Party is committed to cutting irresponsible spending: In an effort to save money, the new plan will prevent your employer from being able to write off lunches purchased for workers or workplace entertainment, HuffPost reported Wednesday.

The move would save $23 billion over 10 years, HuffPost reported — or just 1.3 percent of the total expected deficit increase. Under the current tax code, employers who give the majority of their workers free lunches can deduct 50 percent of the cost. The House version of the bill does not touch free workplace lunch, but it would eliminate tax breaks for employer-paid day care assistance programs, as well as employee-sponsored moving expenses and achievement awards, all for the sake of saving $12 billion.

But the Senate tax bill isn't all bad news! The exemption for the estate tax will be doubled, so if you happen to inherit less than $10 million from a dead relative, you won't have to pay any taxes on the money — which should definitely help you pay for lunch if your employer won't give it to you. Kelly O'Meara Morales

November 22, 2017
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The Roy Moore campaign lashed out at The Washington Post on Wednesday, dubbing the paper "a worthless piece of crap" after it pressed the campaign to provide documentation it claimed to have that discredited one of the several women who have come forth to accuse the Alabama Senate candidate of sexual misconduct.

A spokesperson for the Moore campaign told supporters Tuesday that it was in possession of documents which supposedly showed that Leigh Corfman — who accused Moore of sexually assaulting her when she was 14 years old — lied about her address in the Post's story about Moore's sexual misconduct. The Post followed up with the campaign Tuesday, asking for proof of the documents, but while the campaign initially said it would comply, strategist Brett Doster struck a very different tune in an email Wednesday: "There is no need for anyone at The Washington Post to ever reach out to the Roy Moore campaign again because we will not respond to anyone from the Post now or in the future," Doster wrote. "Happy Thanksgiving."

For good measure, Doster added: "The Washington Post is a worthless piece of crap that has gone out of its way to railroad Roy Moore." Post reporter Michael Scherer said that a longtime Moore aide presented the paper with evidence that "did not contradict what Corman has told the Post."

The campaign has vehemently denied allegations of the candidate's sexual misconduct and has tried to call into question proof given by his accusers. On Tuesday, President Trump told White House reporters that Moore had "totally denied" the allegations of sexual misconduct, which he added took place over 40 years ago, "so, you know." Kelly O'Meara Morales

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