×
FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
July 9, 2014
Getty Images

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden wants to stay in Russia for another year, according to local news reports.

Russian news service RT reported Wednesday that Snowden has formally asked Russia to extend his asylum there, as he faces U.S. charges for leaking government surveillance details. "We have submitted documents to prolong his stay in Russia," Anatoly Kucherena, one of Snowden's lawyers, told RT.

Snowden arrived in Moscow on June 24, 2013, and his asylum expires on July 31. The U.S. wants Snowden extradited to face espionage charges, but Russia has no legal obligation to give Snowden to the U.S., as it doesn't have an extradition treaty with America. Meghan DeMaria

1:27 a.m. ET

They say "don't mess with Texas," but "don't mess with a mom of 12 who drives a truck with a giant sticker that states 'F—k Trump and f—k you for voting for him'" might be more accurate.

While driving her truck around Fort Bend County, Texas, Karen Fonseca's anti-Trump message caught the eye of Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls. In a Facebook post, Nehls, a Republican, put her on blast, saying he had received complaints about the sticker from "offended" residents, and he wanted to find out who drove the truck so he could discuss "a possible modification of the sticker." He threatened to charge the then-unknown driver with disorderly conduct, but when officers determined the truck belonged to Fonseca and discovered she had an outstanding fraud warrant from 2014, she was arrested.

Fonseca is back on the road, and she's added a second sticker to her window: "F—k Troy Nehls and f—k you for voting for him." During a news conference Monday, she said she is considering filing a civil rights lawsuit against Nehls. "If I can do this, it will encourage others to stand up for their rights as well," she told reporters. "No matter what race, religion, or belief you may have, we are all equal. Not any one of us is any better than anyone else. Everyone's voice should be heard." Fonseca isn't wasting her new-found fame — she's started selling "F—k Trump" stickers and is planning to expand her line to include a "F—k Troy Nehls" collection. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017

On Monday, Atlanta's Georgia Dome went down (mostly) in a cloud of dust and debris from 4,800 pounds of explosives. Lots of people were there to witness the razing of the stadium, including Weather Channel cameraman James Crugnale. It was not his lucky day. "TFW you stream the #GAdome being demolished for 40 minutes and a bus stops in front of the camera at the exact moment it implodes," he wrote on Twitter, with video evidence.

Atlanta's Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit Authority put the missed opportunity in perspective. "Given the potential dangers of bringing down the largest structure of its kind," MARTA's chief marketing and communications director, Goldie Taylor, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "if this is the biggest story, we're really glad about that." On Twitter, Taylor "sincerely apologized" to Crugnale for ruining his shot, but was she really sorry?

If, like Crugnale, you want to see the Georgia Dome implode, you can watch the razing unimpeded at the Journal-Constitution. Peter Weber

November 20, 2017
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In 2015, Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) settled a wrongful dismissal complaint filed by a former employee who said she was fired after refusing to "succumb" to Conyers' "sexual advances," BuzzFeed News reports.

The woman, who asked to remain anonymous because she was afraid of retaliation, said she complained in 2014 to Congress' Office of Compliance, and she ultimately signed a confidentiality agreement in exchange for a settlement of $27,111.75, which came from Conyers' office budget. Conyers admitted no fault as part of the settlement, BuzzFeed News reports. His office did not respond to BuzzFeed News' requests for comment, and the Office of Compliance could not confirm or deny dealing with the woman's case.

BuzzFeed News was given documents related to the case by right-wing Twitter provocateur Mike Cernovich, who claimed he passed them along because if he published them, Democrats would "try to discredit the story by attacking the messenger." BuzzFeed News says it independently confirmed the authenticity of the documents, which included four signed affidavits. The affidavits were from women who used to work for Conyers, who said he asked them for sexual favors and would rub their backs and legs. For more on the allegations and the process of filing sexual harassment complaints in Congress, visit BuzzFeed News. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
Pool/Getty Images

On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick permanently blocked President Trump's executive order to cut funding to so-called sanctuary cities, calling it "unconstitutional on its face."

A sanctuary city limits its cooperation with the federal government in enforcing immigration law, and San Francisco and Santa Clara counties in California sued to block the order. Orrick, who previously put a temporary hold on the executive order, ruled that Trump cannot set new conditions on spending that has already been approved by Congress. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

From now until New Year's Eve, for 10 minutes every hour, ads calling for the impeachment of President Trump will greet the masses moving through Times Square in the heart of Manhattan.

The digital billboards are paid for by billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer's political group Need to Impeach. Steyer will spend $20 million on the billboards and television ads, which ask citizens to sign a petition urging elected officials to impeach Trump. "We legitimately feel that this is the huge issue in front of the American people and that no one is standing up for what the overwhelming number of Americans think," Steyer told Bloomberg Politics on Monday.

The billboards went up Monday, and the commercials started airing in October. In the ads, Steyer says Trump is a "clear and present danger" to the United States, helping move the country closer to nuclear war. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke announced Monday that roughly 59,000 Haitians living in the United States who have been protected from deportation since 2010 have 18 months to leave the United States.

Haitians who came to the U.S. after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010 have been safe under a program known as Temporary Protected Status, enacted by Congress in the 1990s to help large groups of undocumented people who fled to the U.S. from natural disasters and wars. More than 30,000 of the affected Haitians live in Florida, and thousands of others live in New York City. Duke is giving the Haitians until July 22, 2019, to leave.

In May, when White House Chief of Staff John Kelly led the Department of Homeland Security, he said conditions in Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere, had improved enough that the U.S. should stop granting Haitians temporary protection. He extended the program for another six months, but warned that those affected should start preparing to return to Haiti, the Los Angeles Times reports. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
Pool/Getty Images

Like Trump University, Trump Airlines, Trump magazine, Trump Steaks, and Trump Vodka, The Donald J. Trump Foundation will soon cease to exist — except this time, the shutdown is planned.

In its 2015 tax filing, the charitable foundation admitted to violating rules against "self-dealing," which prohibits nonprofit leaders from directing charity money to themselves, their families, or their businesses, NBC News reports. In October 2016, the New York attorney general demanded the foundation cease asking for contributions, and in December, President Trump said he would start winding down operations to avoid conflicts of interest.

A spokesperson for the foundation confirmed it is closing down, and said it "looks forward to distributing its remaining assets at the earliest possible time to aid numerous worthy charitable organizations." The foundation can't close down just yet, though. "As the foundation is still under investigation by this office, it cannot legally dissolve until that investigation is complete," Amy Spitalnick, a spokeswoman for the New York attorney general's office, told NBC News. The foundation's 2016 IRS filing, filed this month, states it had assets of close to $970,000. Catherine Garcia

See More Speed Reads