Playing politics
July 3, 2014
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Mississippi Senate candidate Chris McDaniel is stepping up his efforts to overturn his narrow defeat against incumbent Sen. Thad Cochran in last week's Republican primary runoff. His latest move: Offering a $1,000 reward to people who can provide evidence of voter fraud in the election — but first, he's asking his supporters to send in $15 donations to help fund the project.

"To fight the alleged corruption, we need your help," says the McDaniel campaign's official announcement page. "Just $15 will help us begin to eradicate corruption in Mississippi. $15 represents the first steps in helping Chris clean up this mess."

The campaign's message concludes:

If you have evidence that leads to the arrest and conviction of anyone involved in voter fraud on or leading up to the June 24, 2014, Republican primary runoff election in Mississippi, please email it to reward@mcdaniel2014.com or call 601-624-7748 and leave your contact information and someone will follow up with you.

The $15 number is based on an allegation that McDaniel and his supporters have dug up, accusing the Cochran campaign of paying for votes in the primary. Cochran won the runoff with 51 percent, due to an unorthodox strategy of reaching out to the state's black community, which is typically heavily Democratic, to cross over into the Republican primary in order to defeat the Tea Party-backed McDaniel. Eric Kleefeld

This just in
4:10 p.m. ET

Police have safely removed an unexploded WWII bomb from a construction site in north London, near Wembley Stadium.

The 110-pound bomb was apparently dropped in the 1940s during Nazi air raids, The Telegraph reports. And it was discovered by accident, too: Construction workers near the stadium discovered the bomb while at work on Wednesday afternoon. Police haven't released the exact location where the bomb was discovered.

An army spokesperson told The Telegraph that the bomb posed a "genuine risk to life," and local homes and businesses were evacuated until the bomb was defused. Teams from the Royal Logistic Corps excavated the bomb, and the Royal Engineers created a blast wall around the site in case it accidentally exploded.

Soccer fans excited for the weekend games at Wembley don't need to worry, though: The stadium tweeted that its weekend schedule is "unaffected" by the bomb. Meghan DeMaria

Only in America
4:07 p.m. ET
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Wyoming has made it illegal to collect evidence of water pollution and other violations of environmental laws. The ban is designed to protect the state's cattle farmers, who often let herds graze on public lands and defecate near rivers and streams, polluting them with E. coli bacteria. State Sen. Larry Hicks said the ban would prevent environmentalists from interfering with important "economic activity." The Week Staff

Only in America
4:00 p.m. ET
iStock

The Boy Scouts of America has banned water-gun fights, saying that it's not "kind" for scouts to shoot each other with "simulated firearms." The organization's new National Shooting Manual also forbids the use of potato guns and marshmallow shooters. The rules brought a wave of derision, with one critic saying the Scouts are turning "boys into a bunch of wusses." The Week Staff

This just in
3:00 p.m. ET
Facebook.com/19 Kids and Counting

Following the revelation that 27-year-old Josh Duggar, one of the stars of TLC's reality series 19 Kids and Counting, had admitted to sexually molesting multiple girls when he was a teenager, TLC has reportedly pulled reruns of the show — which aired its season 10 finale this week — from its schedule.

"Twelve years ago, as a young teenager, I acted inexcusably for which I am extremely sorry and deeply regret," Josh Duggar said in a statement. "I hurt others, including my family and close friends." Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar, Josh's parents, issued a similar statement, saying their son's actions caused them "to seek God like never before."

The ultimate fate of 19 Kids and Counting is still up in the air, as the network has not yet stated whether it will continue with future seasons. Since the news broke, 2016 presidential candidate Mike Huckabee (R) has defended Duggar, who also resigned from his political post at the Family Research Council, an influential conservative group. Meghan DeMaria

the wonderful world of disney
2:21 p.m. ET

Disney's latest blockbuster, Tomorrowland, invites viewers to enter a futuristic world of robots, jetpacks, and flying trains.

It's a glimpse of a hyper-technological future many would love to visit — including none other than Walt Disney, who channeled his own vision of the future into theme parks like Tomorrowland (a section of The Magic Kingdom) and EPCOT (a theme park in its own right). In a featurette, the creative team behind Tomorrowland shows off original clips of Walt Disney, describing ideas that eventually inspired the new film:

"Many of the things that seem impossible now will become realities tomorrow," says Disney. "A beautiful tomorrow just a dream away. That says we're going places. There's progress ahead."

For Walt Disney's full vision of the future, click here. Scott Meslow

This just in
2:00 p.m. ET
Graham Chadwick/Allsport/Getty Images

The Eiffel Tower was closed to the public on Friday during a protest against petty crime at the landmark. Normally, the tower is open 365 days a year.

Workers from the company that manages the Eiffel Tower said the site has recently seen an increased number of pickpockets. The protest comes a day after Paris authorities said that Paris crimes against tourists are down because of increased surveillance, The Associated Press reports.

According to Paris authorities, pickpocketing was down 23 percent in January through April 2015 from the same period last year. But staff members who work at the Eiffel Tower believe too many tourists are being robbed at the site. BBC News reports that workers claim pickpocketing "gangs" have threatened to assault them, and the workers are asking for a permanent police presence at the site. Meghan DeMaria

survey says
1:44 p.m. ET

A new Gallup poll released today finds that for the first time, equal numbers of Americans self-identify as socially conservative and socially liberal, with 31 percent placing themselves in each category. On economics, however, conservatives still lead by a 20-point margin:

(Gallup)

This change is consistent with increasing support for gay marriage and the legalization of marijuana, while opinions on abortion show no such significant swing. Bonnie Kristian

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