Science!
July 1, 2014
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Countless people from around the world swear they've had a run-in with the ape-like beast known as Bigfoot (or Sasquatch, or Yeti, depending on your region) but a fossil has never been discovered. Several private collections and museums do have strands of hair thought to have come from one of the creatures, and researchers have used those samples to see if science can prove once and for all that Bigfoot does exist.

A team at the University of Oxford led by Professor of Human Genetics Bryan Sykes collected 57 samples of hair and put them through macroscopic, microscopic, and infrared fluorescence tests. That helped eliminate 21 samples that weren't hair, but rather glass fibers, plant materials, and other substances. Of the remaining 36 samples, 30 had recoverable DNA, and all of those matched species that were already known.

The researchers did find that some of the hair didn't come from places where the mammal was known to dwell; two samples discovered in India and Bhutan that were believed to be from a yeti were actually from the extinct Pleistocene polar bear, which was thought to have only lived in the Tibetan Plateau.

Although scientific evidence proving Bigfoot is real wasn't found this time, researchers aren't ruling out that the creature exists.

"Does this evidence disprove the legends of the Yeti, Migyhur, Almasty, Sasquatch/Bigfoot?" Norman MacLeod of the London Natural History Museum wrote. "It does not. Scientific Q1 hypothesis testing of this sort is not designed to, and cannot, prove hypotheses alternative to the null hypothesis." Catherine Garcia

Memorial Day
9:54 a.m. ET
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

President Obama is heading to Arlington National Cemetery on Monday to mark Memorial Day.

Obama said the annual holiday honoring America's war dead was especially meaningful this year because it is "the first Memorial Day since our war ended in Afghanistan." The U.S. still has about 9,800 troops expected to remain in Afghanistan until next year, though.

Observances began a day early on Sunday, when thousands of motorcycle riders participated in the annual Rolling Thunder rally in Washington, D.C., to draw attention to prisoners of war and soldiers missing in action. Harold Maass

This just in
9:14 a.m. ET
Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

A bomb squad Sunday destroyed a pressure cooker found near Washington's Capitol building. The car's owner, Israel Shimeles of Alexandria, Virginia, was arrested and charged with operating a vehicle after revocation.

Authorities said the vehicle was "suspicious" when they found the unattended car smelled of gasoline, and an investigation revealed the pressure cooker. After the pressure cooker was destroyed, authorities said that "nothing hazardous" was found in the vehicle.

Police Lt. Kimberly A. Schneider told The Associated Press that the bomb squad destroyed "items of concern in the vehicle, including the pressure cooker." Meghan DeMaria

This just in
8:24 a.m. ET
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Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, 69, was sentenced Monday to eight months in prison for unlawfully accepting money from a U.S. supporter. Olmert, who was forced to resign in 2009, was convicted in March in a retrial in the Jerusalem District Court.

The eight-month sentence is in addition to a six-year prison sentence Olmert received last year for a separate real estate bribery conviction. Olmert's new sentence also includes a $25,000 fine.

In 2012, Olmert was acquitted on charges including "accepting cash-stuffed envelopes" from Morris Talansky, a U.S. businessman, according to The Associated Press. Talansky apparently gave Olmert about $600,000 while Olmert was mayor of Jerusalem. But later, Olmert's former office manager, Shula Zaken, served as a state's witness, offering recorded conversations between her and Olmert about illicit money deals, which led to a retrial.

Olmert's lawyer, Eyal Rozovsky, has stated that he will appeal the ruling to Israel's Supreme Court, and Olmert was granted a 45-day stay before he must begin the jail sentence. Meghan DeMaria

This just in
7:47 a.m. ET
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Malaysian authorities have discovered more than 139 graves they believe contain the bodies of Bangladeshi and Rohingya migrants.

Police found the graves in abandoned human trafficking camps on the country's border with Thailand. Authorities haven't announced how many bodies were recovered, but each grave likely contained between one and four bodies. The find was part of an investigation that began on May 11.

"I am deeply concerned with graves found on Malaysian soil purportedly connected to people smuggling," Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak tweeted. "We will find those responsible."

Since May 10, more than 3,600 migrants have landed in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand, and thousands more may be trapped at sea. Meghan DeMaria

ISIS Crisis
May 24, 2015
Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter on Sunday faulted Iraqi troops for allowing the Islamic State to conquer Ramadi, saying the homegrown forces lacked the "will to fight."

"What apparently happened is the Iraqi forces just showed no will to fight," Carter said in an appearance on CNN. "They were not outnumbered. In fact, they vastly outnumbered the opposing force. That says to me, and I think to most of us, that we have an issue with the will of the Iraqis to fight ISIL and defend themselves."

Last weekend, ISIS captured Ramadi as Iraqi troops fled and left behind weapons provided by the U.S. Days later, ISIS overran the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra as well. Jon Terbush

This just in
May 24, 2015
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Cleveland police over the weekend arrested 71 people who participated in largely peaceful protests following the acquittal of a police officer in the 2012 killing of two unarmed black people.

Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said protesters became more "aggressive" throughout the day, adding that officers only intervened when they "became violent and…refused to disperse."

On Saturday a judge acquitted officer Michael Brelo over a 2012 incident in which police, after mistaking the sound of a car backfiring for gunshots, fired 137 rounds into a vehicle, killing both occupants. Brelo climbed onto the car's hood and fired 15 times through the windshield, though the judge ruled prosecutors did not prove those shots killed the couple. Jon Terbush

This just in
May 24, 2015
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John Nash, the famed Nobel Prize-winning mathematician who inspired the film A Beautiful Mind, died Saturday in a taxi crash on the New Jersey Turnpike. The 86-year-old Nash and his wife, Alicia, were both killed when the driver of their taxi lost control and slammed into a guardrail. Police said they believe neither Nash nor his wife, who were ejected from the vehicle, were wearing seatbelts at the time of the accident. Known for his work in game theory, Nash won the Nobel Prize for economics in 1994. Jon Terbush

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