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June 10, 2014
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The Department of Veterans Affairs released an audit on Monday tallying the wait times at its 731 hospitals and clinics nationwide. The numbers aren't good. Of the roughly six million veterans scheduled for care at these facilities, more than 57,000 have been waiting more than three months for an appointment, and almost 64,000 others have never been seen despite having been enrolled in the VA system for a decade. In three-quarters of hospitals, some wait-time data had been manipulated, and 13 percent of schedulers told auditors that "supervisors or others" had told them to falsify that data, The New York Times reports.

As of last month, most veterans were scheduled to be seen within 30 days, but individual VA medical centers had worse numbers. In the Phoenix hospital, which started the scandal, the average wait time for a new primary care patients was 55 days, and lots of VA hospitals had worse delays. The worst? Honolulu, at 145 days. The VA audit tagged 112 facilities for further review. Peter Weber

10:51 a.m. ET

California's Thomas Fire grew to be the second-largest wildfire in the state's recorded history by Sunday morning. The blaze has burned more than 267,000 acres and is expected to grow larger than the all-time biggest California fire as soon as Sunday night thanks to continued high winds in Southern California. The fire now poses a serious threat to hundreds of homes in Montecito, a coastal town on the outskirts of Santa Barbara.

"When the [sundowner winds] surface in that area and the fire starts running down slopes, you are not going to stop it," said Mark Brown, of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. "And we are not going to stand in front of it and put firefighters in untenable situations."

See the fire's projected growth via the Los Angeles Times below. Bonnie Kristian

10:42 a.m. ET

President Trump defended congressional Republicans' final tax bill while speaking with reporters Saturday, accusing Democrats of criticizing the plan without knowing what it will do. "It's going to be one of the great Christmas gifts to middle-income people," Trump said. "The Democrats have their sound bite, the standard sound bite before they even know what the bill is all about."

Trump also praised the strength of the economy, which he said will "start to rock" at up to 6 percent annual growth thanks to the tax bill and "what we've done with regulation and other things." Watch an excerpt of the president's comments via his Twitter account below. Bonnie Kristian

8:49 a.m. ET

Saturday Night Live's President Trump (Alec Baldwin) is excited to trim the White House tree now that he has declared an end to hostilities in the "War on Christmas," and this year, the first family is decorating on a theme. Joined by the first lady, some of his children, and various administration staff, Trump adorns his "tree of shame" with ornaments featuring the faces of "all the haters and losers [he] destroyed this year."

The haters and losers are mostly former members of the Trump White House, but fired FBI Director James Comey and former Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore are on the tree, too. Elf on the Shelf Attorney General Jeff Sessions (Kate McKinnon) shows up on the mantel to help with the tree trimming and wish everyone a merry Christmas, because "everybody is gonna get away with everything!"

Watch the full sketch below. Bonnie Kristian

8:22 a.m. ET
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At least eight people were killed and dozens more wounded, nine critically, on Sunday in a suicide attack on a Methodist church in Quetta, Pakistan, close to the Afghan border. Four attackers targeted the church, but only one detonated his suicide vest. Another was killed in a gunfight with police, and two more were intercepted at the church door, preventing further casualties.

More than 400 people were at Bethel Memorial Methodist Church when the attack occurred, reported Sarfaraz Bugti, the regional home minister. They were attending a Christmas service. The attack has yet to be publicly linked to a specific terrorist organization. Bonnie Kristian

7:58 a.m. ET
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Attorneys representing President Trump's transition team on Saturday accused Special Counsel Robert Mueller of unlawfully obtaining tens of thousands of private emails as part of his probe into Russian election meddling and alleged Trump campaign involvement.

The lawyers sent a letter to the oversight committees of both houses of Congress claiming Mueller has run afoul of both attorney-client privilege and the Fourth Amendment's restrictions on search and seizure. The emails in question were obtained from the General Services Administration (GSA), which the letter says "did not own or control the records" but handed them over to Mueller anyway.

Mueller's office denied wrongdoing, stating it has always "secured either the account owner's consent or appropriate criminal process" in accessing emails for the investigation. The GSA said the transition team was informed there was no expectation of privacy for these records, and that the transition team was never promised that it would be informed or consulted before the records were distributed. Bonnie Kristian

December 16, 2017
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The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday to rescind Obama-era net neutrality rules. Supporters of the change argue it will foster innovation and give customers more options, while opponents raise the specter of the "end of the internet as we know it" — and they have the sympathy of 83 percent of voters (including 75 percent of Republicans).

That broad support for retaining the previous regulatory scheme may fuel efforts to revive net neutrality in Congress. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced Friday he intends to force a net neutrality vote under the terms of the Congressional Review Act (CRA). "It's in our power to do that," Schumer said. "Sometimes we don't like [administrative rule changes] but now we can use the CRA to our benefit, and we intend to." Were a net neutrality law passed by Congress, it would be more impervious to repeal than the agency-level policy the FCC rescinded.

Meanwhile, public interest groups and attorneys general in states including New York, Oregon, and Washington are gearing up to sue the federal government over this week's decision. "I don't think the courts are going to approve of the wholesale deregulation of telecom," Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) told The Hill. Bonnie Kristian

December 16, 2017
ABC News/Screenshot

A civil rights lawyer named Lisa Bloom solicited donations to pay women who have made or were considering making sexual harassment allegations against President Trump, The Hill reported Friday. Documents reviewed by The Hill date these efforts to the final months of the 2016 election and suggest that people associated with political action committees supporting Hillary Clinton were among those Bloom contacted.

"Bloom's efforts included offering to sell alleged victims' stories to TV outlets in return for a commission for herself," The Hill story says, as well as "arranging a donor to pay off one Trump accuser's mortgage and attempting to secure a six-figure payment for another woman who ultimately declined to come forward after being offered as much as $750,000."

Bloom told The Hill donors came to her with the money, not vice versa, and "said her goal in securing money was not to pressure the women to come forward, but rather to help them relocate or arrange security" if they felt they were in danger after speaking out.

In an appearance on ABC's Good Morning America on Saturday, Bloom again denied soliciting money, saying "donors reached out" to her "and said, 'Oh my God, what can we do to help these women?'" "If you're a single mom unemployed on the verge of bankruptcy and thinking about speaking out against Donald Trump," she added, "an offer of relocation and round-the-clock security is very meaningful to you." Bonnie Kristian

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