Innovation of the Week
June 7, 2014

Intel showed off a new "piece of wearable computer-like clothing" last week: a T-shirt made from conductive fibers that can track wearers' vital statistics, such as their heart rate, and deliver them to a smartphone or a computer through Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, said Nick Bilton at The New York Times. The shirt, which Intel is marketing as gear for fitness-conscious customers, is constructed using small sensors that are woven into the fabric.

Afro & Deziak?
12:54 a.m. ET

There really could have been an NBC show called American Power Hour in the early 1980s, but it's unlikely it would have featured a black-and-white R&B duo called "Afro & Deziak." But despite the spot-on VHS-quality look the Tonight Show crew managed to create, realism isn't the reason to watch Jimmy Fallon and guest Pharrell Williams sing and dance. You watch for the crazy outfits, cheap laughs, and quick costume changes. Isn't that reason enough? —Peter Weber

Time to move to Indiana
12:31 a.m. ET

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) was David Letterman's guest on Wednesday night's Late Show, and Letterman asked about the kerfuffle over the "religious freedom" law in his home state, Indiana. Franken and Letterman both agree that gays and lesbians, because they are people, should not be discriminated against, and that Gov. Mike Pence (R) erred in signing the law. Then Letterman got down to brass tacks.

"Here's what I want to know," Letterman started. "I love Indiana, and I'll probably be buried in Indiana, and I know I've embarrassed the state many, many times.... What can I do now to make the governor feel uncomfortable." Franken had a brainstorm: "As a matter of fact, there's an open seat there," with Sen. Dan Coats (R) not seeking re-election in 2016. "I think you should run," he said. Letterman, who will be jobless next year, shakes his head no, but Franken has a point: Candidates with 35-40 years of professional comedy under the belt have fared pretty well in politics. —Peter Weber

RIP
April 1, 2015

Cynthia Lennon, the first wife of John Lennon and mother of their son, Julian, died of cancer on Wednesday at her home in Mallorca, Spain, at age 75. Cynthia Powell and John Lennon met in art school in Liverpool, and married in 1962 after she became pregnant but before the Beatles recorded their first single, "Love Me Do."

It was not a very happy marriage, according to her two memoirs and several interviews, and it ended after John started a relationship with his future second wife, Yoko Ono. After their divorce in 1968, Cynthia Lennon remarried three times, and her last husband died in 2013. She is survived only by Julian Lennon, who posted this video after her death. —Peter Weber

April Fools
April 1, 2015

If new Late Late Show host James Corden wasn't familiar with America's April Fools Day tradition before Wednesday's show, he was afterward. Katie Couric is the guest, and anything else would kind of ruin the punchline. Watch below. —Peter Weber

TV talk
April 1, 2015
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Any publicity is good publicity, right?

According to the Daily Mail, Barbara Walters, who created ABC's The View in 1997, believes that bringing on a controversial figure as co-host would boost the show's floundering ratings.

Walters sold the rights to The View to ABC last year. In an interview with David Letterman in 2014, Walters said that she didn't think that being on the show was what Lewinsky wanted at the time, but added, "I think it'd be great if she were on The View, but I wouldn't expect it tomorrow."

The "network source" quoted by the Mail said that Walters thinks Monica would attract a younger demographic interested in her story and what she has to say, though her presence would likely bar an appearance by Bill or Hillary Clinton.

Lewinsky has reportedly been asked to appear on the show as a guest to discuss her anti-bullying campaign, but a network executive said there are no plans to bring her on as a co-host.

A new Gooooal!
April 1, 2015
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Thirteen U.S. senators have signed a letter to the head of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) in a bipartisan effort to allow for a vote on moving the 2018 World Cup to a different location.

Fox News reports that Sens. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) are leading the charge to find a new host country for the competition. The senators cite "Russian aggression" and point to the fact that nearly half of the 2014 World Cup participants have joined international sanctions against Russia as reasons to consider "[denying] the Putin regime the privilege of hosting the 2018 World Cup."

Discoveries
April 1, 2015

When workers from Russia's Rosneft oil company set out on a land reclamation project, they had no idea they would stumble on an important discovery. The workers unearthed the tusks of a female woolly mammoth during the project, near the city of Nyagan in western Siberia.

When the first tusk emerged in an excavator bucket, the workers began digging with hand shovels. They found the second tusk as well as tibia, ribs, and teeth, and jaw fragments from the animal.

Rosneft called the Khanty-Mansiysk Museum of Nature and Man to assess the find, and museum paleontologists confirmed the remains are at least 10,000 years old. They believe the mammoth was 30-40 years old when it died.

The museum will clean the tusk and bones, and experts will use radiocarbon dating to determine the remains' exact age. The experts also hope to determine whether the mammoth was part of the European or North American subspecies.

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