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May 20, 2014

Walter Bunker, a 90-year-old World War II veteran, accepted his college diploma Saturday, proving it's never too late to go back to school.

Bunker attended Xavier University in Cincinnati during the 1940s, but left once the idea of graduating got to be too much for him. "I decided to put it off for a little bit, and that became 70 years," he told FOX19 Cincinnati. Bunker was a bombardier in World War II, and went on to work in real estate. After surviving lung cancer and watching his children and a grandchild graduate from Xavier, he knew it was time to return to the classroom.

The college registrar worked with him, and Bunker was able to transfer credits from the Air Force to Xavier. In need of just two more credits, Bunker submitted stories he had written, which allowed him to earn his Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree. So what's Bunker going to do now? "I guess I'll have to go out and start looking for a job," he joked. Watch Bunker receive his degree below (he's accompanied by another member of the Class of 2014, Iraq War veteran Ryan Hoefer). --Catherine Garcia

11:13 a.m. ET

In an interview on ABC's This Week Sunday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) strongly opposed former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton as a potential replacement for Michael Flynn, who recently resigned from his post as national security adviser.

"I think the problem with John Bolton is he disagrees with President Trump's foreign policy," Paul said. "He would be closer to John McCain's foreign policy. John Bolton still believes the Iraq War was a good idea. He still believes regime change was a good idea. He still believes that nation building is a good idea," the senator continued. "My fear is that secret wars would be developing around the globe, and so I think he'd be a bad choice." McCain, Paul said in the same interview, was likewise wrong on Iraq and would lead the U.S. into "perpetual war" were he in charge.

Bolton's name was previously floated for secretary of state or deputy secretary of state, possibilities Paul rejected in equally vehement terms, casting a Bolton hire as a regressive betrayal of Trump voters. One of Trump's best attributes is "his opposition to the Iraq war and regime change," Paul wrote in a November op-ed, while "Bolton was one of the loudest advocates of overthrowing Saddam Hussein and still stupefyingly insists it was the right call 13 years later." Watch his comments on ABC below. Bonnie Kristian

10:49 a.m. ET

Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus clashed Sunday over President Trump's tweet labeling the media an "enemy of the American people."

"I don't have any problem with you complaining about an individual story" or bias, Wallace said. "But you went a lot further than that — or the president went a lot further than that he said that the 'fake media' — not certain stories — the 'fake media' are an 'enemy to the country.'"

Priebus pushed back, arguing that the issue is "not just two stories" that may be marred by bias or error but "24 hours a day, seven days a week" of cable news programming that focuses not on the Trump administration's policy accomplishments but "total garbage, unsourced stuff" about personal dynamics between White House staff and alleged unsavory ties between the Trump campaign and Russian spies (a charge Priebus categorically denied in the same conversation).

Wallace disagreed with Priebus' assessment, noting that every Trump action Priebus mentioned had received widespread cable news coverage. "You're right, some of these things were covered," Priebus conceded, "but you get about 10 percent coverage [of Trump's accomplishments] but then as soon as it was over the next 20 hours is all about Russian spies…"

Wallace cut him off: "But you don't get to tell us what to do, Reince, any more than that Barack Obama did. Barack Obama whined about Fox News all the time, but I gotta say, he never said that we were an enemy of the people." Watch an excerpt of their exchange below. Bonnie Kristian

10:16 a.m. ET

President Trump's tweet declaring the media an "enemy of the people" — and his antagonism to the press more broadly — are characteristic of a would-be dictator, Republican Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) and Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.) independently charged in interviews airing this weekend.

McCain's allegation came first in a Saturday conversation with NBC's Chuck Todd on Meet the Press. "The fact is we need you, we need a free press. It's vital," McCain said. "That's how dictators get started," he continued a few moments later. "They get started by suppressing free press, in other words, a consolidation of power. I am not saying that President Trump is trying to be a dictator. I am just saying we need to learn the lessons of history."

Schiff appeared on ABC's This Week in an interview scheduled to air Sunday. "This is something that you hear tin-pot dictators say when they want to control all of the information," he said of Trump's media tweet. "It's not something you have ever heard a president of the United States say." Watch an excerpt of each man's remarks below. Bonnie Kristian

9:50 a.m. ET

After it was delayed for repairs Saturday, the first joint SpaceX-NASA rocket launch had a successful liftoff Sunday morning. The Falcon 9 rocket launched at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, and it will deliver a load of cargo to the International Space Station.

The rocket took off from Launch Pad 39A, the same pad Apollo 11 used in 1969 on the way to the moon. SpaceX has a 20-year lease on the pad and hopes to use it to send manned flights into space as early as 2018. Bonnie Kristian

9:13 a.m. ET
Aaron Tam/Getty Images

The USS Carl Vinson, accompanied by the guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer, was deployed to the disputed waters of the South China Sea on Saturday to make what the U.S. Navy says are routine patrols. The Vinson carries a fleet of 60 aircraft and will be "demonstrating [the strike group's] capabilities while building upon existing strong relationships with our allies, partners, and friends in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region," said Rear Admiral James Kilby.

The ocean territory in question is claimed by China, Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Beijing said in a statement it "firmly opposes any country's attempt to undermine China's sovereignty and security in the name of the freedom of navigation and overflight." Bonnie Kristian

8:17 a.m. ET
Dan Balilty/Getty Images

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu secretly met with Jordan's King Abdullah II and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in 2016 to consider a regional peace initiative negotiated by then-Secretary of State John Kerry, Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported Sunday. The covert talks took place in Jordan last February, and terms of the agreement Netanyahu would ultimately reject included renewed peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian leadership as well as Arab nations' recognition of Israel as a Jewish state.

Netanyahu confirmed Sunday that the meeting took place and said in a gathering of Likud ministers that it occurred at his initiation. He did not accept the conditions Kerry proposed because he did not believe he could win approval from his coalition government.

History will "definitely judge the magnitude of the opportunity as well as the magnitude of the missed opportunity," tweeted Israeli opposition leader Isaac Herzog in response to the news on Sunday. Bonnie Kristian

8:00 a.m. ET
John Moore/Getty Images

Two memos proposing stricter deportation guidelines for asylum seekers and unaccompanied minors have been sent from Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to the White House for approval, McClatchy reported Saturday afternoon. The documents are dated Feb. 17 and have yet to receive final go-ahead from the president.

One memo would increase deportations by giving asylum officers greater discretion to deny asylum requests. At present, 88 percent of asylum seekers pass their initial interview with field officers; they then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing (sometimes a multi-year delay), at which point only 18 percent successfully gain asylum. Under the new guidelines, officers would be more likely to deny applicants at the interview stage if they believe the asylum seeker does not have a "significant possibility" of winning in court.

The second memo concerns children who travel to the U.S. alone to meet parents already living here illegally. Those children would be more likely to face deportation, and their parents could face criminal charges if they paid a human trafficker to transport their child. Bonnie Kristian

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