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May 19, 2014

Yusuf Yerkel, an adviser to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, has now gone on medical leave for a week — after a controversial event in which he was photographed kicking a protester.

The incident occurred last week during Erdoğan's visit to the town of Soma, which was struck by a mining disaster that has killed 301 people. In the widely circulated photo, the protester was already being held on the ground by police special forces as Yerkel was standing and kicking him.

Hürriyet Daily News reports:

According to the medical report, Yerkel went to the Ankara Atatürk Training and Research Hospital at around 8 p.m. on the same day with a complaint about pain and panicula on his right knee and was examined by Dr. Servan Gökhan. In the medical examination, Yerkel reportedly said the pain and panicula on his knee emerged because he fell.
He has been diagnosed with soft tissue trauma and given medical leave.

In a press conference on Friday, a spokesman for the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) stood by Yerkel's version of the altercation: "Yusuf Yerkel said the person who he was kicking on the floor had attacked him, injured him, and that he has taken medical leave for seven days." Eric Kleefeld

9:21 a.m. ET

A man billed as a "Swedish defense and national security adviser" on Fox News is unknown in the Swedish national security community, The Washington Post reported Saturday afternoon. Nils Bildt appeared on a segment of Fox's The O'Reilly Factor on Thursday to argue immigration has made Sweden unsafe, but a Swedish newspaper reported the next day Bildt is not known to Sweden's military or foreign ministry.

He emigrated from Sweden in 1994 and was convicted of a violent offense in Virginia in 2014. Bildt is not his original surname; it appears to be intended to suggest relation to Carl Bildt, a former Swedish prime minister and foreign minister whose brother — a different man — is also named Nils.

Bill O'Reilly will address the issue Monday. In the meantime, you can watch the segment featuring Nils not-Bildt below. Bonnie Kristian

7:38 a.m. ET

The Democratic National Committee on Saturday chose former Labor Secretary Tom Perez as the new DNC chair in a race President Trump alleged on Sunday was stolen from the Bernie Sanders wing of the party by Hillary Clinton and her accomplices:

Seven candidates were in contention for the position, but Perez, the preferred candidate of many former members of the Obama administration and the Hillary Clinton campaign, was one of two favorites along with Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who was backed by progressives, including Sanders.

The chair vote was taken in two ballots — Perez was one vote shy of triumph on the first round — amid some controversy over a last-minute decision to use paper ballots instead of an electronic voting method, a change Ellison supporters viewed with suspicion. The final vote was 235 for Perez and 200 for Ellison. Bonnie Kristian

7:27 a.m. ET

In the latest volley of his war on the press, President Trump tweeted Saturday evening that he will break with decades of tradition to skip the White House Correspondents' Dinner, which is scheduled for April 29.

The White House Correspondents' Association said in a statement it "takes note" of Trump's decision, but will not cancel this "celebration of the First Amendment and the important role played by an independent news media in a healthy republic." Several media outlets already canceled their pre- and after-parties in protest of Trump's behavior.

The last president to miss the dinner was Ronald Reagan in 1981; he skipped because he was recovering from being shot in an assassination attempt — but still phoned in a message. Bonnie Kristian

February 25, 2017
Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Billionaire Warren Buffett published his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders on Saturday, predicting investors "will almost certainly do well" if they stick with a "collection of large, conservatively financed American businesses." The American economy "is virtually certain to be worth far more in the years ahead," he wrote, enthusing about American "economic dynamism":

One word sums up our country’s achievements: miraculous. From a standing start 240 years ago — a span of time less than triple my days on earth — Americans have combined human ingenuity, a market system, a tide of talented and ambitious immigrants, and the rule of law to deliver abundance beyond any dreams of our forefathers. You need not be an economist to understand how well our system has worked. Just look around you. [Berkshire Hathaway]

Buffett devoted a large portion of his letter to decrying Wall Street fees that aren't worth it for investors:

The bottom line: When trillions of dollars are managed by Wall Streeters charging high fees, it will usually be the managers who reap outsized profits, not the clients. Both large and small investors should stick with low-cost index funds. ... My calculation, admittedly very rough, is that the search by the elite for superior investment advice has caused it, in aggregate, to waste more than $100 billion over the past decade. Figure it out: Even a 1% fee on a few trillion dollars adds up. Of course, not every investor who put money in hedge funds ten years ago lagged S&P returns. But I believe my calculation of the aggregate shortfall is conservative. [Berkshire Hathaway]

Read Buffett's full letter here, or see Forbes' selection of its seven best quotes if you just want the highlights. Bonnie Kristian

February 25, 2017

The Democratic National Committee on Saturday voted down a resolution that would have revived a ban on corporate lobbyist donations first instituted by President Obama. The corporate lobbyist donation ban was lifted by Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the former DNC chair who resigned last summer amid allegations of primary contest favoritism.

Saturday's vote produced outrage on social media, particularly in the party's progressive wing.

The main item on the DNC meeting agenda in Atlanta Saturday is the selection of a new DNC chair. The top two contenders are Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and former Labor Secretary Tom Perez. Bonnie Kristian

February 25, 2017
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday, President Trump told the story of his "very, very substantial" friend Jim, who used to be very fond of vacationing in Paris but no longer visits because "Paris is no longer Paris."

French President Francois Hollande on Saturday took issue with the anecdote, which Trump shared in service to a point about fighting terrorism. "There is terrorism and we must fight it together," Hollande said. "I think that it is never good to show the smallest defiance toward an allied country. I wouldn't do it with the United States and I'm urging the U.S. president not to do it with France."

Parisian Mayor Anne Hidalgo previously responded Friday on Twitter, telling Trump she "celebrate[s] the dynamism and the spirit of openness of #Paris." Bonnie Kristian

February 25, 2017

After sweeping the Golden Globes, La La Land is the heavy favorite for Best Picture — not to mention its 13 other nominations, the most for any film this year — at Sunday's 2017 Academy Awards ceremony. Still, there are seven other Best Picture nominees, and an intriguing analysis by The New York Times finds their support is far from uniform across the United States.


(The New York Times)

The rationale behind some of the movies' geographic popularity — which the Times mapped using location data on each film's Facebook likes — is more obvious than others. For example, Hidden Figures, which tells the true story of black women's oft-ignored contributions to the space race, was most popular in the Black Belt region of the South, which has a large African-American population. Likewise, Hacksaw Ridge, another true story, was a big hit in the Appalachian area from which its main character hails.

Other connections aren't so simple. For example, Arrival, a science-fiction film about alien contact, was popular in Maine, which the Times notes "has a lot of U.F.O. sightings."

See the Times' full breakdown here, or, if you prefer to accept the (probably) inevitable, check out this review of La La Land by The Week's Lili Loofbourow. Bonnie Kristian

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