Your daily cry
May 16, 2014

A news anchor from Taiwan's CtiTV was reportedly found dead at his home in Taipei on Thursday. Authorities suspect suicide. It is the kind of news no family member or friend wants to hear, let alone deliver.

But a fellow CtiTV reporter did just that, despite not knowing about her colleague's death prior to the live broadcast. She starts, "This just in," according to the YouTube captions. She manages to get through the first sentence, but her stoic demeanor cracks as she reads the words that detail her friend's death. Her mouth turns down, her chin wobbles, her eyes tear up, and her voice cracks, but she completes the segment with heartbreaking poise.

It is the kind of rare occupational hazard that no one should have to endure. You can turn on the YouTube captions in the video below, but the impact is just as strong without. --Lauren Hansen

Fondue really is good date food
4:57 a.m. ET

If you shut off the TV or switched from CBS after David Letterman's final sign-off Wednesday night, you missed Late Late Show host James Corden's car trip with Justin Bieber. Don't worry, they posted it to YouTube. It's billed as "carpool karaoke" — which, not to quibble too much, is wrong both because the music has the original vocal tracks and only one of the dudes is going to work (Corden) — but the singing to the radio is the least interesting part, anyway.

The reasons to watch are Justin Bieber's impressive Rubik's Cube skills and the conversation — specifically, Bieber's reaction when Corden laid out a fairly elaborate fantasy involving a woman, a bed, some Bieber tunes, and a cutout of Bieber's silhouette on the bathroom door. Lesser pop stars might have jumped out of the car; Bieber agreed to swap clothes. You can watch below. —Peter Weber

Bin laden Library
4:28 a.m. ET
Salah Malkawi/Getty Images

Among the trove of documents and book titles newly declassified and released from the U.S. raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in May 2011 was a letter bin Laden wrote to one of his wives in Iran around December 2010. In the three-page letter he discusses routine domestic issues, like his wife's dental work, and says he was thinking about leaving for another hideout.

"I have been living for years in the company of some of the brothers from the area, and they are getting exhausted — security wise — from me staying with them and what results from that," he wrote. "Sadly, I came to realize that they have reached a level of exhaustion that they are shutting down, and they asked to leave us all." He had been with the hosts for so long, he added, "I think that I have to leave them," though it would take a few months "to arrange another place where you, Hamza, and his wife can join us."

As The New York Times notes, "it is impossible to know how any change in location by Bin Laden might have altered the ability of American intelligence agencies to accurately track him to his secret compound." If he had escaped before the May raid, he might still be alive.

Watch this
2:57 a.m. ET

Whether or not you're a Deadhead, Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann has a madcap and highly entertaining story on Conan about the time the Dead played a Hugh Hefner TV show on CBS, Playboy After Dark. As the band was setting up, Kreutzmann told Conan O'Brien, he started to hear crazy things from the TV crew, about cameras out of focus and mics not on. After looking around, "I had this strange suspicion," he said, and he finally figured out that famed LSD maker Owsley Stanley had dosed the 150-cup crew coffee pot. The entire crew was tripping on acid. "It wasn't illegal in 1967," Kreutzmann said when Conan suggested that must be some kind of crime.

Kreutzmann, who has a new memoir out, also discussed how Jerry Garcia came up with the name for The Grateful Dead, how everybody hated it, and geeked out on Dungeons & Dragons with Patton Oswald. Watch below. —Peter Weber

Quotables
2:08 a.m. ET

Sgt. Craig Harrison, a retired British army soldier, killed two Taliban fighters more than 1.5 miles away in 2009, making him one of the most accurate known snipers in the world. But his decades as a sniper have left a deep mental scar, and he has "flashbacks all the time" of "the people the I've killed," he told the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire in an interview, his back turned to the camera. Harrison said he is on a lot of medication, has trouble sleeping, and is suffering from PTSD related to being shot in the helmet and being injured in an anti-tank mine explosion.

"Anyone who says they don't feel anything for the people they've killed are not telling the truth," he told Derbyshire. And that's doubly true for snipers, who see their victims up close. "You see them spit on the floor, you see them talking," he said. "You own their life, basically. You're their god for that split second, and then you take them out." Watch below. —Peter Weber

happy birthday
1:34 a.m. ET

The ubiquitous Pyrex measuring cup in your kitchen made its debut in 1925, but the first Pyrex dish hit the market 10 years earlier, after a Corning scientist brought home a sawed-off industrial-glass jar to his wife, who baked a sponge cake it in. At least that's Corning's story, and they're sticking to it at a Pyrex centennial celebration at the Corning Museum of Glass, starting June 6. Pyrex is still around — and still "hot," as Associated Press reporter Michael Hill notes in the video below — but Corning hasn't made the iconic heat-resistant glass since it sold its consumer products division in 1998; it's now made by World Kitchen, based in Rosemont, Illinois. For more Pyrex facts, watch below or read AP's fact sheet. —Peter Weber

last night on late night
12:37 a.m. ET

The two kids with the lowest GPAs in the Oneonta High Class of 1989 know the word "prerogative," thanks to Bobby Brown, so you know Jimmy Fallon and Dwayne Johnson did their homework — or, more likely, remember 1989 pretty well (also, let's be honest, 1989's Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure). The conceit of this bit from Thursday's Tonight Show is that high schools sometimes let the low-achievers give commencement addresses, too, and that they would make horrible predictions from the future. Such as: "Don't get caught up in fads that won't last, like 'computers,'" says Johnson's character, Logan Duffy. The kicker is the '80s-style "this is what happened to..." wrap-up before the closing credits. Watch and bask in the nostalgia below. —Peter Weber

This just in
May 21, 2015
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Police in Washington, D.C., say that Daron Dylon Wint, 34, the suspect in a bloody quadruple homicide in the capital, is in police custody. An arrest warrant accuses Wint, 34, of murdering a former employer, Savvas Savopoulos 46, along with his wife and 10-year-old son and their housekeeper, Veralicia Figuaroa, at the family's mansion in Northwest Washington. Police say that the victims had been bound and kept hostage overnight before being murdered; their bodies were found May 14. According to CNN, Wint's girlfriend had told authorities he planned to turn himself in. Peter Weber

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