×
FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
May 13, 2014

Louis C.K.'s show on FX, Louie, has never been one to mince words. Last night's episode, "So Did the Fat Lady," had quite a lot to say about dating while overweight.

In the episode, the titular character Louie at first rejects the advances of bubbly waitress Vanessa (Sarah Baker), before finally asking her out. Smart, funny, and independent, Vanessa is a great match for Louie. But, as Libby Hill points out at the AV Club, "not even being the platonic ideal is enough when you're an overweight woman," and Vanessa can sense that Louie somehow feels he deserves better.

The issue comes to a heartbreaking climax in the episode's final scene, when Vanessa bluntly tells Louie that the worst thing a man can do is tell a fat woman that she's not fat. "What is it about the basics of human happiness — you know, feeling attractive, feeling loved, having guys chase after us — that's just not in the cards for us?" she asks. The whole scene is emotional and wonderfully acted, and naturally, critics have many interesting things to say about it.

Watch the scene in full below. --Samantha Rollins

2:17 p.m. ET

President Trump has continually emphasized that he was powerless to end his administration's policy of separating immigrant families at the border, blaming Democrats for laws that required the practice even though the separations began after Trump began his "zero tolerance" immigration policy last month and no law exists that mandates parents be separated from their children.

Now, Trump is reportedly poised to sign an executive order that would halt the separations. Many of his critics, Democrats and Republicans alike, have been pointing out that Trump could have reversed his own policy any time, or that he could have told Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to stop the practice. An executive order would cast doubt on all his previous statements when he claimed that only Congress could pass legislation to fix the problem, The Washington Post reports.

Watch some of the instances when Trump and Nielsen claimed their hands were tied below, via The Washington Post. Summer Meza

2:10 p.m. ET
Larry W. Smith/Getty Images

The San Francisco Police Department has identified a suspect in the murder of at least five gay men in the late 1970s, CNN reports. The killer, who was known as "the Doodler" because he would sketch strangers in bars, could have killed as many as 14 different people. "I'm looking at five murders," said Inspector Dan Cunningham. "But I'd be a fool to say he didn't do more."

While police repeatedly questioned one man in connection to the murders in the 1970s, they never caught the Doodler — who would leave bars with the men he sketched, then stab his victims to death. A drawing of the Doodler was released in 1975 based on three men who were assaulted by a person that detectives at the time believed was their killer. "We have a suspect in the assault that spawned the sketch," explained Cunningham.

After the recent arrest of the suspected Golden State Killer, investigators are hoping they might be able to get usable DNA samples from blood samples taken at two Doodler crime scenes as well. The Doodler today would be in his early 60s, if he is still alive; the police have updated their sketch of him to look as he would now. Jeva Lange

1:54 p.m. ET
John Moore/Getty Images

Some migrant children separated from their parents at the border are barely children at all. They're babies.

Infants as young as 3 months old have ended up in Michigan after their parents are detained far away, the Detroit Free Press reports. They arrive on planes in the middle of the night, often with no idea where they're headed, and are placed in foster homes, says a foster care supervisor.

That's a far cry from the account of a Homeland Security official, who told BuzzFeed News on Friday that "we do not separate babies from adults." Yet the next day, an 8-month-old and an 11-year-old arrived in Grand Rapids, Michigan, after weeks away from their parents, per the Free Press. They're among 50 immigrant children — average age: 8 years old — who have landed in Michigan instead of "tender age" detention facilities near the border.

Michigan foster parents are used to taking in unaccompanied migrant children. But the migrants are usually old enough to cross the border alone and know how to find their families already here, New York Times immigration reporter Miriam Jordan said on The Daily podcast Wednesday.

Children arriving in Michigan today are only getting younger, the foster care supervisor told the Free Press. They now come to the U.S. with family, but are torn away when their parents are detained, and they may go a month without even reaching their parents on the phone. Read more at the Detroit Free Press. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:48 p.m. ET

Michael B. Jordan fans, rejoice: The first trailer for Creed II is here.

The clip, which dropped Wednesday, takes everything to the next level: The stakes are higher, the foe more menacing. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone shine as they reprise their roles of Adonis Creed and Rocky Balboa, respectively, in the sequel to 2015's Creed.

The trailer begins as Jordan's Creed finds himself struggling to keep his father's legacy alive as he continues to build his own, and ultimately builds to a pivotal reveal: Viktor Drago — the son of Ivan Drago, whose infamous punch killed Creed's father Apollo in Rocky V — steps up to challenge Creed.

Creed earned more than $170 million worldwide and earned Stallone a 2016 Oscar nomination for Best Actor in a Supporting Role. Stallone wrote the screenplay for Creed II himself, and Steven Caple Jr. has signed on to direct. The film will reunite Jordan with Black Panther director Ryan Coogler, who is an executive producer on the film.

Creed II is set to hit theaters Nov. 21. Watch the full trailer below. Amari Pollard

1:19 p.m. ET
Molly Riley-Pool/Getty Images

President Trump will reportedly sign an executive order to end his own administration's "zero tolerance" policy of separating migrant parents from their children at the U.S.-Mexico border, The New York Times reports. Ahead of the expected order, Trump canceled Thursday's congressional picnic, saying it "doesn't feel right" because "we're doing something so important."

Trump and other administration officials have long resisted reversing the heavily-criticized policy of separating families, initially announced by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in May. Trump has attempted to pass the blame off on Democrats, and when asked why he didn't take executive action by ABC News' Kenneth Moton last week, Trump replied: "We can't do it through an executive order."

Also on Wednesday, The Associated Press reported that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, who has been at the center of the controversy, reportedly drafted an order that would put an end to the policy she has defended. "We will not apologize for enforcing the laws passed by Congress," she had tweeted earlier this week, although there are no such laws ordering children to be separated. "We are a nation of laws. We are asking Congress to change the laws."

The New York Times notes that Trump's executive order, which would end "the separation of families at the border by indefinitely detaining parents and children together," would have to also get around the 1997 Flores settlement, which prohibits the government from holding minors in immigration detention for more than 20 days, regardless of if they are with a parent or not.

CNN says Trump had faced pressure from first lady Melania Trump over the policy, which many critics have pointed out he could have ended at any time. Jeva Lange

12:37 p.m. ET
Somodevilla/Getty Images

Even President Trump has claimed that he "hates" his administration's policy that separates immigrant children from their families at the border, but senior adviser Stephen Miller is apparently a fan.

Miller, a top White House policy adviser, is reportedly quite happy with how things are going, leading one fellow staffer to equate his behavior to that of Nazi war criminals, Vanity Fair reported Wednesday.

"Stephen actually enjoys seeing those pictures at the border," an outside White House adviser said. "He's a twisted guy, the way he was raised and picked on. There's always been a way he's gone about this. He's Waffen-SS."

Waffen-SS, the Nazi Party's armed forces, were considered particularly brutal even among other factions of Hitler's regime. Miller has been a "driving force" behind the Trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy, and he's glad to finally have the ear of the president to create the political change for which he's yearned for many years, reports The New York Times. As public outcry continues to increase as images and audio recordings of youth immigrant detention facilities circulate the web, Miller is celebrating a job well done. Read more at Vanity Fair. Summer Meza

12:23 p.m. ET

Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) has declared that migrant family separation at the border is his next civil rights cause.

The congressman declared he'll "go to the borders" and is even "prepared to go to jail" to end the controversial policy in a news conference Wednesday, reflecting on his many arrests fighting for civil justice over the past 50 years.

"If we fail to do it, history will not be kind to us," Lewis said, before asking Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) to tell him "whatever you want me to do" to reunite children with their families.

Lewis joined Gutierrez and other House Democrats in a press conference outside the Capitol on Wednesday. The lawmakers then took advantage of a House rule that says each member can bring two children under the age of 12 into the chamber, per the Chicago Sun-Times, bringing children into the building to make a point about the family separations. Democrats continued their speeches inside, where Lewis again pleaded Congress to "stop the madness." The in-House protest ended when Gutierrez called the visiting children onto the floor and spoke beyond the few minutes he was allowed. Kathryn Krawczyk

See More Speed Reads