2014 Watch
May 8, 2014
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There's something about being in an outpost like Portland, Oregon, that makes one almost immune to both fame and scandal. Maybe that's what explains why the Acela Corridor crowd has largely ignored the bizarre stories coming out of Oregon this week about Mitt Romney-endorsed Senate candidate Dr. Monica Wehby.

Where to begin? Let's start with the fact that a medical child-abuse case involving Dr. Wehby is set to begin on May 19 — the day before her primary. In the case, a woman is being accused of "harming her children with unnecessary medical procedures, several of which were performed by pediatric neurosurgeon and U.S. Senate candidate Monica Wehby." Putting aside questions of innocence or guilt, one can only suppose this is — at best — a major distraction.

Then there's the fact that Democrats are filing a complaint over a super PAC running ads attacking Wehby's GOP opponent. The problem? Wehby is reportedly romantically linked to a major funder of the group — raising questions about coordination.

Another large contributor to that same super PAC is a man named Loren Parks, who was recently profiled in a Mother Jones post titled, "Meet the Sex Hypnotherapist Helping the GOP Retake the Senate." (Need I say more?)

Now, it wouldn't be surprising for Wehby's GOP opponent to be pushing all these storylines. But it seems unlikely this is coming from him. It's probably more a combination of tough timing and Democrats trying to take out the candidate they fear most before November.

Regardless, I'm stunned that these stories haven't gained more national attention. This might all be much ado about nothing, but it's all still weird. Wehby is just lucky she doesn't live in New York. Matt K. Lewis

Watch this
7:27 a.m. ET

"The Swan" is arguably the most beautiful movement of Carnival of the Animals by Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns, usually performed with just piano and cello. On Monday's Late Show, justifiably legendary cellist Yo-Yo Ma played the tune with Stephen Colbert's house band, Jon Batiste and Stay Human. They didn't stick to the traditional arrangement, throwing in brushed drums, bass, guitar, and sax. With a lesser or more heavy-handed arrangement, that could have been a recipe for disaster. It wasn't. There's enough terrible news in the world — watch and enjoy some rare beauty below. Peter Weber

Crisis in Syria
6:59 a.m. ET

On Monday, NATO ambassadors held an emergency meeting after Russian fighter jets in Syria flew at least two sorties into Turkish airspace over the weekend, once locking its weapons onto Turkish fighter jets. The NATO officials warned that Russia's "irresponsible behavior" could have serious consequences. Russia responded that the incursions were an accident and that "there is no need to look for conspiratorial reasons." U.S. and NATO officials dismiss that explanation and suggest Russia is trying to intimidate Turkey and its allies.

In Chile on Monday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. is "greatly concerned" about the Russian incursions "because it is precisely the kind of thing that, had Turkey responded under its rights, could have resulted in a shootdown." If Russia attacks Turkey, NATO is obligated to come to Ankara's defense.

Russian fighter jets join an increasingly crowded aerial battlefield over Syria, where Russian and Syrian jets are bombing one side of the country and the U.S.-led coalition — which includes Turkey as well as France, Australia, Canada, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia — is bombing Islamic State and other Islamist targets around the country. "What we're seeing now is a lot of different countries and coalitions operating in the skies over Syria," said Stephane Dujarric, a spokesman for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. "I think it creates a situation that is fraught with danger and very delicate, as we'd seen in the issue of the violation of the airspace with Turkey.... This should really refocus people's attention on finding a political solution." Peter Weber

6:15 a.m. ET

On Tuesday, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics to two particle physicists, Takaaki Kajita in Japan and Arthur B. McDonald in Canada, for their discovery of neutrino oscillations and the resulting evidence that subatomic neutrino particles have mass. "The discovery has changed our understanding of the innermost workings of matter and can prove crucial to our view of the universe," the academy explained in a news release. Those findings "have yielded crucial insights into the all but hidden world of neutrinos. After photons, the particles of light, neutrinos are the most numerous in the entire cosmos."

The two scientists will share the $960,000 prize as well as the honor of winning the same award as Albert Einstein, Marie Curie, and Niels Bohr. Peter Weber

This just in
5:25 a.m. ET

On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice, the European Union's highest court, threw out a 15-year-old agreement allowing companies to transfer data freely between the U.S. and EU. The ruling, which can't be appealed, appears to prohibit Facebook, Google, and other tech companies large and small from moving data about their European customers to the United States, and nobody is quite sure what will happen next.

The case was started by an Austrian law student, Max Schrems, who sued Facebook in Ireland — Facebook's European headquarters — arguing that due to revelations by U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, European consumer data wasn't given adequate privacy protections by Facebook and other U.S. tech companies. The ECJ agreed, immediately invalidating a "safe harbor" agreement in place since 2000 that allows about 4,000 U.S. and European companies to transfer data overseas on the understanding that that data will be given the privacy safeguards applicable to each country's consumers.

Under the new ruling, national regulators will be able to judge whether companies meet their national privacy rules, and stop them from transferring data if they don't. "Companies may not be able to move people's data until domestic data protection authorities give their approval," London privacy lawyer Marc Dautlich tells The New York Times. "In some of Europe's 28 countries, that is not going to be easy."

The court's decision, and stalled two-year-old negotiations for a new safe harbor agreement highlights "the different approaches to online data protection by the United States, where privacy is viewed as a consumer protection issue, and Europe, where it is almost on a par with such fundamental rights as freedom of expression," notes The New York Times. The European Commission is expected to address the ruling on Tuesday. Peter Weber

last night on late night
4:40 a.m. ET

"I love shopping at Whole Foods," Stephen Colbert said on Monday's Late Show, "because I love organic produce, and I cannot stand having money." That was the beginning of a short rundown of a spate of Whole Foods mini-scandals, from overcharging for its prepackaged products to a new apology about selling tilapia and goat cheese made by prisoners. "Prison labor?" Colbert said in mock consternation. "But everything at Whole Foods is supposed to be cage-free!"

But this isn't the last thing Whole Foods will have to apologize for, Colbert predicted, so to help the grocery chain out, he issued a few pre-emptive apologies on their behalf. The mea culpas range from the gross (think "ground Chuck") to the absurd. The crowd favorite? "It is our solemn pledge that our cashiers will now add up the cost of your products, instead of just typing in the highest number they can think of." Watch below. Peter Weber

last night on late night
4:06 a.m. ET

Somebody at The Late Late Show is a dedicated Taylor Swift fan, and it might just be host James Corden. On Monday's show, Corden performed the fairly impressive feat of acting out a soap opera scene using only (mostly) Taylor Swift lyrics. He had some help from Julianne Moore and John Stamos, and while Moore is a fine actress, Stamos clearly has the daytime soap thing down cold. If you don't appreciate smashed vases, Corden as a greaser, and the wisdom of Taylor Swift, well, haters gonna hate (hate hate hate). Peter Weber

colbert nation
3:50 a.m. ET

Stephen Colbert was going over Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) résumé on Monday's Late Show when McCain stopped him at mention of being the Republican Party's 2008 presidential candidate. "Thanks for bringing that up," he said sarcastically, before softening the line with a joke: "After I lost, I slept like a baby: Sleep two hours, wake up and cry, sleep two hours, wake up and cry." Lest you think there were no hard feelings, McCain followed it up with another zinger. "If you'd won..." Colbert started, and McCain finished: "I wouldn't be on this show." Still, if you think about what could have been, the senior senator from Arizona continued, you'll just needlessly drive yourself crazy. And then McCain had one more quip, which you can watch below. Peter Weber

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