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May 6, 2014
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After three years of extreme drought, the city of Wichita Falls, Texas, is planning on turning wastewater into drinking water.

Mayor Glenn Barham tells NPR that the situation is serious in his North Texas town, where pools can't be filled after being drained and car washes are closed one day a week to save water. Residents have cut their water use by more than a third, Barham said, but the water supply is still likely to run out in two years. To remedy this, a 13-mile pipeline has been built, connecting the city's wastewater plant to the purification plant. Yes, that means that water flushed down the toilet will wind up being cleaned and sent back out through the tap.

City official Daniel Nix stresses that the water will be safe, and that much of it will come not from toilets, but sinks, bathtubs, washing machines, and dishwashers. After the wastewater is treated, it will be mixed with lake water, and undergo further chlorination, filtering, and reverse osmosis. While many residents still believe the plan is "gross," business owner Julia Spence trusts the city. "You do have to give them the benefit of the doubt, because they've done their research, they've spent a whole lot of money, they've tested, tested, tested," she told NPR. "This is where I was born and raised, and I'm not ready to close my business and pack up and move." Catherine Garcia

3:51 p.m. ET

There is trouble in Hillaryland: According to anonymous sources who spoke with Politico, Hillary Clinton is frustrated with her campaign staff — and vice versa. With the too-close-for-comfort win over Bernie Sanders in Iowa and a victory for the Vermont senator on the horizon, Clinton is reportedly looking to reassess the staff at her Brooklyn headquarters sooner rather than later.

One source who is close with both Hillary and her husband, former president Bill Clinton, said, "The Clintons are not happy, and have been letting all of us know that. The idea is that we need a more forward-looking message, for the primary — but also for the general election too… There's no sense of panic, but there is an urgency to fix these problems right now."

There is dissatisfaction among Clinton's staffers, too:

Over the summer while her campaign was bogged down in the email controversy, Clinton was deeply frustrated with her own staff, and vice versa. The candidate blamed her team for not getting her out of the mess quickly, and her team blamed Clinton for being stubbornly unwilling to take the advice of campaign chairman John Podesta and others to apologize, turn over her server, and move on. The entire experience made her a deeply vulnerable frontrunner out of the gate, and underscored a lack of trust between Clinton and her operatives, many of whom were former Obama staffers that she didn't consider part of her inner circle of trust.

Her advisers were also frustrated by having to play roles they hadn't been hired for and were ill-suited for. From the beginning, [the campaign's top pollster and strategist Joel] Benenson was frustrated that he was forced to split his time between defending his boss on emails and defining a path for her candidacy. Clinton, meanwhile, longed for a chief strategist in the Mark Penn mold who could take on a more expansive role than playing pollster. [Politico]

Read the full story in Politico. Jeva Lange

3:47 p.m. ET
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Canada will stop its airstrikes on the Islamic State forces in Syria and Iraq by Feb. 22, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Monday.

"As I said many times throughout the campaign in my commitment to Canadians, this is a non-combat mission," he said.

Trudeau, who took office in November, added that airstrikes don't help local communities attain long-term stability. Instead, he'll up military personnel in the region and train more local forces, The Washington Post reports.

The Pentagon has said it respects Trudeau's decision to halt strikes, but did not invite Canada's defense minister to recent meetings the U.S.-led coalition held in Paris. Julie Kliegman

3:25 p.m. ET

During a campaign stop in New Hampshire, Jeb Bush showed off his throwing arm by lobbing a snowball at NBC reporter Jordan J. Frasier. Only, there wasn't much to show off.

"You can't do anything about it!" Bush taunted the reporter, whose hands were full managing the camera. Bush seemed to think about it for a second and added, "That's not fair, actually." Frasier, laughing, didn't seem to mind — and he caught the whole thing on film. Watch below. Jeva Lange

3:12 p.m. ET
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

An average audience of 111.9 million viewers tuned into CBS for Super Bowl 50 on Sunday night, making the program the third most-watched in TV history, Variety reports. The matchup between the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers trailed the 2015 and 2014 NFL championship games, which had 114.4 viewers on NBC and 112.2 viewers on Fox, respectively.

Viewership peaked at 115.5 million viewers Sunday between 8:30 and 9 p.m. ET, when Beyoncé and Bruno Mars joined Coldplay for the halftime show. Julie Kliegman

2:55 p.m. ET
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Donald Trump has captured a wide lead in New Hampshire ahead of the Tuesday primary, where voting begins as early as midnight. According to a University of Massachusetts Lowell/WHDH poll released Monday, Trump holds the support of 34 percent of likely Republican voters in the Granite State, followed by Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz with 13 percent apiece, and Jeb Bush and John Kasich with 10 percent each. Among Democrats, Bernie Sanders has a strong 56-40 lead over Hillary Clinton. However, New Hampshire is famously a "late-breaking" state with many undecided voters, and polls are typically subject to scrutiny.

Pollsters surveyed 407 likely Democrats with an adjusted margin of error of +/-5.52 percent and 464 likely Republican voters with an adjusted margin of error of +/-2.99 percent; voters were interviewed between Friday and Sunday. See the full results here. Jeva Lange

2:08 p.m. ET

A possibly very confused voter at a John Kasich town hall in Windham, New Hampshire, wanted to know why she should vote for the Ohio governor in the "Democratic primary" — and Kasich, a Republican, didn't correct her. The question did not seem to be a slip of the tongue, either: The voter said she was having a hard time deciding between Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, and John Kasich in the "Democratic primary" and wanted to know why Kasich should have her vote.

"Isn't that interesting," Kasich said as the crowd around her gasped. However, without mentioning his political allegiance or correcting the voter, Kasich went on to position himself as a good compromise between Sanders and Clinton saying, "One of them's too hot, one of them's too cold, but I've got the right temperature."

When Kasich asked the voter how he did in convincing her, she awkwardly dodged by saying, "I'll let you know tomorrow." Watch the scene unfold, below. Jeva Lange

1:57 p.m. ET
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Chris Martin majorly owes Beyoncé, and not just because she and Bruno Mars salvaged Coldplay's impressively sub-par halftime show. Bey, who collaborated with Martin on Coldplay's 2015 song "Hymn for the Weekend," apparently wasn't always so eager to work with him.

When Martin played her a prospective collaboration song, "Hook Up," she had some pretty blunt feedback for him, he told Rolling Stone. The "Formation" singer turned Martin down "in the sweetest possible way: She told me, 'I really like you — but this is awful.'"

It's not hard to laugh at Martin, but who among us doesn't envy that he has been in the presence of Beyoncé? Julie Kliegman

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