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April 30, 2014

Gerry Adams is being questioned in connection to the 1972 murder of Jean McConville, a mother of 10 who was abducted by a dozen Provisional IRA members and shot in the head. Her body was discovered at a Lough beach in 2003. Adams is currently the leader of Sinn Féin, the second largest political party in Northern Ireland.

Adams was a key figure in "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland and the peace process afterward. Over the last 15 years Gerry Adams has attempted something of public-image rehabilitation. But his activities as leader of "the psychotic IRA division in Belfast" have not been forgotten. He has been accused of sanctioning a series of terrorist attacks in London in the 1970s. And over the last two years, released testimony of several IRA members — including former Belfast commander Brendan Hughes — have named Adams as the one who ordered the murder and secret burial of Jean McConville in 1972.

Adams is only in custody for questioning at this point, and he released a statement asserting his innocence: "While I have never disassociated myself from the IRA and I never will, I am innocent of any part in the abduction, killing, or burial of Mrs. McConville."

Sinn Féin has been doing very well in recent polling heading into an election. Read the rest of the story in The Irish Times. Michael Brendan Dougherty

2:16 p.m. ET
Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The State Department marked 81 of more than 500 Hillary Clinton emails released Saturday as confidential, The Hill reports. Another three were upgraded to "secret" status, and none were marked "top secret," the highest designation.

None of the emails released Saturday had been marked confidential when they were originally sent.

The State Department still has more than 3,000 emails to release from Clinton's private server, which she used as secretary of state. Julie Kliegman

1:24 p.m. ET

In case the Rubik's Cube isn't already challenging enough to solve, one puzzle maker just made it physically demanding, too. Tony Fisher constructed a monstrous cube, spanning just over 5 feet in either direction and weighing in at about 224 pounds.

Fisher believes his creation could be the biggest functional Rubik's Cube in the world, and he hopes to get it recognized as such by Guinness World Records.

On his YouTube page, he notes that the cube broke shortly after he shot the surreal video below, but he's working on getting it fixed. Julie Kliegman

12:36 p.m. ET
Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images

Singer Katy Perry has attended the Grammys for eight years straight. But for Monday's show, she's doing something a little different — watching from home, she told The New York Times.

Perry will be rooting for The Weeknd "in my pajamas, eating matzo ball soup. No makeup, glad I'm not in a corset. Vicks cream on."

With 13 nominations, Perry has yet to win a Grammy of her own. Julie Kliegman

11:53 a.m. ET
Achilleas Zavallis/AFP/Getty Images

Refugees are arriving in Europe by boat at a faster rate in 2016 than at the beginning of 2015, the United Nations Refugee Agency said in a report released Friday.

In the first six weeks of 2016, more than 80,000 refugees have arrived in Europe. That's more than in the first four months of 2015.

Many European countries, including Turkey, say they're struggling to keep taking in refugees, many of whom are fleeing conflict in Syria.

More than 400 refugees have died crossing the Mediterranean so far in 2016. Julie Kliegman

11:10 a.m. ET
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Across 10 programming languages, women are considered better coders than men, a new study published by computer science researchers shows.

Researchers examined 3 million pull requests, or contributions to projects, on GitHub, an open-source software community, and found that code written by women was accepted at 78.6 percent to men's 74.6 percent.

But there's a catch, The Guardian reports. Women's work was only accepted more than men's if their GitHub profiles were gender neutral. When users clearly identified as women, their acceptance rate was lower than that of their male peers. Julie Kliegman

10:35 a.m. ET
Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

More than 5,000 pregnant women in Colombia have been infected by the Zika virus, the country's national health institute said Saturday. In the nation, 31,555 people in total have the virus, Reuters reports.

The Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency, is thought to be linked to microcephaly, a birth defect. So far there are no cases of microcephaly linked to Zika in Colombia.

The mosquito-borne virus, which has been traced back to Brazil, has spread to more than 30 countries. Julie Kliegman

9:36 a.m. ET
Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

The mother of Dylan Klebold, one of two boys who killed 13 people at Columbine High School in 1999, gave her first televised interview Friday. Speaking to ABC's Diane Sawyer, Sue Klebold said she missed warning signs her son was depressed.

"I think we like to believe that our love and our understanding is protective, and that 'if anything were wrong with my kids, I would know,' but I didn't know, and I wasn't able to stop him from hurting other people," she said.

Klebold's interview, which you can watch here, comes as she promotes her Feb. 15 memoir, A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy. Julie Kliegman

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