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April 30, 2014

The L.A. Clippers still had a playoff game to take care of Tuesday night, hours after the NBA banned owner Donald Sterling for life and fined him $2.5 million for his racist remarks about not wanting his girlfriend to hang around with black people. So how did the fans greet the players? Like so:

It's been an emotional, trying few days for the team. Kudos to the fans for still coming to the game — there was talk of a fan boycott to hit Sterling's pocketbook — and showing some much-needed support for the players. Jon Terbush

6:14 a.m. ET
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Since the real estate company owned by President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, started doing business in Maryland in 2013, it has been the state's most aggressive practitioner of a controversial debt-collection method called body attachment, where a landlord gets a judge to order the arrest of former tenants who fail to appear in court for allegations of unpaid rent, fines, and fees, The Baltimore Sun reports, citing court records. In all, 20 former tenants have been detained, and a dozen have filed for personal bankruptcy protection to avoid arrest.

Kushner Cos. owns 17 apartments complexes with nearly 9,000 units in Maryland, mostly in the Baltimore area, and pays other firms to manage them. The company earns at least $30 million in profit a year off $90 million in revenue from the properties, The Baltimore Sun reports, and the Kushner-controlled entities have managed to collect $1 million out of the $5.4 million in judge-approved judgments against 1,250 tenants since 2013, averaging $4,400 per judgment including original debt, court costs, lawyer fees, and interest.

Kushner Cos. "follows guidelines consistent with industry standards" and state law, and its management partner, Westminster Management, "only takes legal action against a tenant when absolutely necessary," company CFO Jennifer McLean said in a statement. And real estate interests say that body attachments — for former tenants who miss two court appointments — can be the only way to make delinquent tenants pay up. At least some tenants say they were never notified of the court dates or dispute the money owed.

Not all collection agencies use body attachments, in part because "they don't want to risk the public relations issue," Amy Hennen at the Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service tells the Sun. Garnishing wages, which can be ruinous for poor people barely scraping by, is "harsh" enough, she said. "But certainly the body attachment is probably the worst, because we're talking about what is effectively a debtors' prison, which is something out of Charles Dickens." You can read more at The Baltimore Sun. Peter Weber

4:53 a.m. ET

John Oliver began Sunday's Last Week Tonight with a sometimes NSFW farewell to Stephen Bannon, the White House chief strategist shown the door on Friday. Oliver's audience cheered when he showed a photo of President Trump's core team, whittled down from six people to just two. Trump "is surrounded by four white nothings and Mike Pence — so, let's make that five white nothings," he said. "But the truly depressing thing about Bannon's departure is just how utterly unsatisfying it actually is. Because yes, one panderer to white nationalists has left the White House. The problem is, the one he was working for is still very much there."

Oliver ended up at the same conclusion when he took a look at Trump's very bad week, especially his perceived legitimizing of white supremacists at a news conference on Tuesday. Lots of people condemned Trump from unusual corners, he said, though Trump still had his tearful defenders on Fox News, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) shot down rumors that he was very disappointed with Trump, and House Speaker Paul Ryan condemned white supremacists without mentioning Trump by name.

"You can mention him," Oliver said. "He is not Voldemort, he's just a terrifying entity who viciously attacks his enemies and judges people based on their birthright — you know what? I do hear it now. I hear it now." The fact is, fewer than 20 percent of the 292 Republicans in Congress "could be bothered to unequivocally condemn Trump by name," he said, and that's a problem because Trump is "a key part of the problem."

"So look, although this week has repeatedly been called a turning point, much as though I would love to believe that, I really don't see it," Oliver concluded. "We're not so much turning anymore as spinning. We are basically on a carousel that will not stop, we've vomited so much there's nothing left to throw up, and there's just no way to get off because an unstable, race-baiting carney is operating the controls." Nothing will change until one last person leaves the West Wing, he added, and Trump isn't going anywhere. There is some NSFW language. Watch below. Peter Weber

3:55 a.m. ET

Nuclear waste "is a serious health hazard, and America has a lot of it," John Oliver said on Sunday's Last Week Tonight. "And you may live closer to nuclear waste than you think." For decades, America has known it needs a safe place to store this nuclear waste — one expert in 1990 compared America's nuclear situation to a house built without a toilet — and that was Oliver's focus on Sunday: "Why do we not have a nuclear toilet?"

On one level, this is easy to understand, he said, because in World War II the U.S. rushed to create atomic weapons to defeat the Nazis, "who — fun fact — pretty much all Americans agreed were bad at the time." He ran through some of the bad-to-horrifying solutions America came up with in early days of nuclear waste, and noted how some of the improperly stored waste has sickened people and created radioactive alligators, among other problems. Luckily, the U.S. government and scientific community came up with a solution 60 years ago. Unfortunately, the envisioned facility for the worst waste still hasn't been built.

For more on why America hasn't buried its nuclear waste yet, who much we're spending on the Hanford site in Washington State, and how little things have changed in 40 years, plus a running gag about a terrifying American Girl doll, watch below. (Yes, there is NSFW language throughout.) Peter Weber

3:07 a.m. ET

Late Sunday night, work crews began removing four statues from a main mall on the University of Texas campus in Austin, three of them Confederate leaders and the fourth a former Texas governor. UT Austin President Greg Fenves announced the removal in an email to the campus community just before 11 p.m., saying the three Confederate statues — two generals, Robert E. Lee and Albert Sidney Johnston, and Confederate postmaster general John Reagan — "run counter to the university's core values." The events in Charlottesville last weekend, he added, "make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism."

Those three statues will be relocated to the Briscoe Center for American History on campus, while the fourth statue, of former Gov. James Stephen Hogg (1891-95), will likely be relocated elsewhere on campus. In 2015, after the shooting of black congregants at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, Fenves convened a committee to examine the three Confederate statues plus one of Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president; he then had the Davis statue and one of President Woodrow Wilson moved to the museum, leaving the four statues that are being taken down overnight.

UT Austin spokesman Gary Susswein said the statues are being removed in the middle of the night, 10 days before fall classes start, "for public safety and to minimize disruption to the community." Some protesters against the removals showed up anyway, as did some counter protesters, as the Austin American-Statesman's Mary Huber documents. "We do not choose our history, but we choose what we honor and celebrate on our campus," Fenves wrote. "Erected during the period of Jim Crow laws and segregation, the statues represent the subjugation of African Americans. That remains true today for white supremacists who use them to symbolize hatred and bigotry."

Update, 4 a.m. EDT: All four statues have been removed. Peter Weber

2:39 a.m. ET
iStock

Just call him Dr. Jayden.

Jayden Fontenot, a quick-thinking 10-year-old, recently saved his newborn brother's life, keeping his cool the entire time. Ashley Moreau of Sulphur, Louisiana, had no idea she was in labor until she went to the bathroom and saw her baby was starting to come out, feet first. Her eldest son Fontenot ran to his grandmother's house, called 911, then raced back to his mother, asking what he could to help. As gently as possible, Fontenot began to slowly pull at the baby's feet, "just hoping I didn't hurt him," he told ABC News. Fontenot was able to get the baby out, safely.

Had he not intervened, the baby would have died, doctors said, and it's possible Moreau could have bled out. "I'm just so proud of him," she told ABC News. "I don't think he understands how big this is. He saved me and his brother's life." Both Moreau and her newborn are doing well. Catherine Garcia

2:13 a.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

So far this year, Republican committees have paid close to $1.3 million to companies owned by President Trump, new Federal Election Commission records show.

The Washington Post analyzed the records, and found that at least 25 congressional campaigns, state parties, and the Republican Governors Association have spent more than $473,000 combined at hotels or golf resorts owned by Trump, and Trump's companies received another $793,000 from the Republican National Committee and Trump's campaign committee. Trump's re-election committee has paid nearly $15,000 for lodging at Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., and the hotel has hosted events for several Republican members of Congress, including Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.), whose campaign committee spent more than $11,000 on catering and event space in May and June, and Rep. Jodey Arrington (Texas), whose committee paid almost $9,700 in January for food, beverages, and facility usage, the Post reports.

These payments have helped properties like Trump's private club in Florida, Mar-a-Lago, which otherwise lost business because of Trump; in response to his reaction to the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, 10 of the 16 galas and dinners planned for next winter at the club have been cancelled, the Post reports. Catherine Garcia

1:45 a.m. ET
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In a nationally televised address on Monday night, President Trump will lay out his new strategy for the war in Afghanistan, and the strategy is expected to include sending "several thousand" more U.S. troops to aid in the 16-year war, The New York Times reports. Trump announced that he had completed his strategic review on Saturday morning, and on Sunday night, Defense Secretary James Mattis told reporters that Trump has "made a decision," adding, "I am very comfortable that the strategic process was sufficiently rigorous and did not go in with a preset position."

There are currently about 8,400 U.S. troops in Afghanistan as part of the 13,000-strong NATO force that's training and advising the Afghan military, plus another 2,000 or so U.S. troops conducting counterterrorism operations against Taliban, al Qaeda, and Islamic State militants. Trump gave Mattis the authority in June to deploy up to 3,900 more troops to Afghanistan, but Mattis has declined to do so without a broader strategy in place.

The president has been working on his Afghanistan strategy for months, as former President Barack Obama did when he took office. Trump was inconsistent during the campaign on what he thought the U.S. should do about Afghanistan, and he has considered pulling out as president, because, as he noted in 2013, the war is very expensive.

But Trump has told advisers he's been shown maps of Afghanistan from 2014 and 2017, and the Taliban's presence in the country (indicated in red) had grown from a little bit to more than half the map today, reports Jonathan Swan at Axios, adding: "Trump has been reluctantly open to the generals' opinion and I'm told he doesn't want to be the president who loses the country to the terrorists." At the same time, GOP strategist Ron Bonjean tells The Washington Post, Trump's "address is designed to turn the page from the Charlottesville chaos and remind voters that Trump is commander in chief and has made an informed and responsible decision." The speech, from Fort Meyers in Virginia, will be at 9 p.m. EST, during a town hall House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) will be conducting through CNN. Peter Weber

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