×
FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
April 27, 2014

LeBron James added a new layer to the "greatest player of all time" debate Saturday night when he threw down a vicious breakaway dunk directly in front of Michael Jordan.

The Heat were already pounding the Bobcats, the team Jordan owns, when James stole the ball and sprinted down court. As he went up for the dunk though, James appeared to stare not at the rim, but rather in the direction of the Bobcats' bench and Jordan himself.

After the game, James insisted that he "absolutely" did not stare at Jordan. It's possible he was being coy; there's not much for James to gain by admitting to playing a personal game of one-upmanship. But even if James honestly didn't intend to glare at Jordan, his no-look slam would still be the game's top highlight. Jon Terbush

12:11 p.m. ET

The White House has issued an informational statement echoing President Trump's controversial use of the word "animals" to describe members of the MS-13 gang. Trump's initial comments came under fire when he apparently used the dehumanizing word to describe some immigrants in sanctuary cities, although he later clarified he was using "animals" specifically to refer to violent gang members.

The press release issued Monday is titled "What you need to know about the violent animals of MS-13." The release uses eight different statements like, "In Maryland, MS-13's animals are accused of stabbing a man more than 100 times and then decapitating him, dismembering him, and ripping his heart out of his body," and "MS-13's animals reportedly saw murder as a way to boost their standing in the gang." The statement ends by vowing that "President Trump's entire administration is working tirelessly to bring these violent animals to justice."

Writing for The Week, Paul Waldman recently argued that Trump "has used a particular strategy to justify his immigration policies: Focus on crimes committed by individual immigrants as a way of ginning up fear and hatred, creating animus toward all immigrants. And when necessary, use dehumanizing language — like calling them 'animals' — to make sure that your target audience feels no empathy or hesitation about supporting the cruelest policies to target them." Jeva Lange

11:49 a.m. ET
FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images

Women's rights activists in Saudi Arabia were arrested last week, reports The Washington Post, just weeks before the nation lifts a ban on women driving.

Several of the seven activists who were jailed were leaders in the campaign to allow women to obtain driver's licenses, which the Saudi government approved last year. Five women and two men were detained on charges of "suspicious contact with foreign parties" and "undermining the country's stability and social fabric," the Post reports.

One of the detainees, Loujain Hathloul, was arrested in 2014 after driving into Saudi Arabia to protest the driving ban. Hathloul, Eman al-Nafjan, and Aziza al-Yousef have also vocally opposed the nation's male guardianship system, which requires men to accompany women to access government services, reports BuzzFeed News.

Groups like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have denounced the arrests, calling the activists victims of a "chilling smear campaign" by government officials. The Saudi government has pledged to reform many of its laws regarding its social structure and women's rights, but activists and advocacy groups say the reality of the kingdom's advancements is far from what officials have claimed. Summer Meza

11:11 a.m. ET

Hillary Clinton spoke at Yale's Class Day on Sunday, referencing the university's tradition of wearing silly (typically DIY) hats for the occasion by bringing a Ushanka hat along for a predictable joke about President Trump. "A Russian hat," she said, waving but not actually wearing it. "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em."

Clinton also revisited her loss to Trump in a more serious tone. "I'm not over it," she said. "I still think about the 2016 election. I still regret the mistakes I made. I still think, though, that understanding what happened in such a weird and wild election in American history will help us defend our democracy in the future."

Watch the hat moment below. Bonnie Kristian

10:55 a.m. ET

In a survey of 87 cybersecurity experts published Monday, The Washington Post found they overwhelmingly believe state election systems are vulnerable to hacking in the 2018 midterms.


(The Washington Post)

"We are going to need more money and more guidance on how to effectively defend against the sophisticated adversaries we are facing to get our risk down to acceptable levels," Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.), co-chair of the Congressional Cybersecurity Caucus and one of the experts polled, told the Post. "I hope Congress continues to work to address this vital national security issue," Langevin added. He argues the $380 million allotted for election cybersecurity in March is not enough.

On a more positive note, the experts who spoke with the Post generally agreed systems are more secure than they were in the last election, and there is "no evidence that Russian hackers actually changed any votes in 2016," though they did access some voter data. Bonnie Kristian

10:41 a.m. ET
Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The Supreme Court voted 5-4 along ideological lines on Monday to rule that federal arbitration law allows employers to prevent their employees from banding together in class-action lawsuits and require them to go through individual arbitrators for disputes. The ruling, with Justice Neil Gorsuch writing the majority, is a "big win for businesses" and "a major blow to workers," New York's Cristian Farias tweeted.

While supporters of arbitration argue it is cheaper, "critics say companies are trying to strip individuals of important rights, including the ability to band together on claims that as a practical matter are too small to press individually," Bloomberg writes, adding that "about 25 million employees have signed arbitration accords that bar group claims."

Liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the 30-page dissent, which is five pages longer than the majority decision, SCOTUSblog reports. She called the ruling "egregiously wrong" and said the Federal Arbitration Act "demands no such suppression for the right of workers to take concerted action for their 'mutual aid or protection.'"

Gorsuch said that the "policy may be debatable but the law is clear: Congress has instructed that arbitration agreements like those before us must be enforced as written." Read more about the decision on Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis at SCOTUSblog. Jeva Lange

10:26 a.m. ET

Facebook announced a crackdown on political advertising in early April, a move intended to assuage fears about political misinformation and election meddling. Among the changes, which will be fully implemented Tuesday, Facebook will display who pays for political ads. The social network will also institute a complex process to verify purchasers of U.S. political advertising are Americans (or permanent residents) living in America.

CNN's Donie O'Sullivan decided to experience that process for himself, sharing the results on Twitter. The steps include: giving Facebook your address so the company can physically mail you a verification code, uploading images of your driver's license or passport, and submitting your Social Security number.

Basically, buying a political Facebook ad now requires the same level of personal information as opening a bank account.

And the scope of application for this process is broad. Facebook says it applies to "national issues of public importance" including civil rights, government reform, the exceedingly vague "values," and much more. A number of prominent media organizations, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Washington Post, have sent a letter to Facebook complaining that news content will be inappropriately lumped in with advocacy. Bonnie Kristian

10:08 a.m. ET
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo threatened Iran with a string of new demands in a Monday speech, following President Trump's recent decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal.

To deter Iran from developing nuclear weapons, Pompeo said, the U.S. will impose "the strongest sanctions in history" and create military pressure. "We will track down Iranian operatives and their Hezbollah proxies operating around the world and crush them," said Pompeo. Bloomberg reports that the secretary of state listed 12 "basic requirements" that the U.S. would demand before lessening up the "sting of sanctions." Other demands included releasing Americans held captive in Iran, ceasing support for terrorist groups in the Middle East, and withdrawing military forces from Syria.

The U.S. would eventually be willing to lift Iranian sanctions in exchange for a major change in behavior, America's top diplomat added. If Tehran verifiably ended its nuclear weapons program and stopped its "destabilizing activities in the region," said Pompeo, the U.S. would consider offering "relief." Read more at Bloomberg. Summer Meza

See More Speed Reads