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Business
April 23, 2014
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One year after the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,129 workers, Western retailers and apparel brands are divided into two factions, both trying to improve conditions but disagreeing about everything from inspection processes to how to best help garment workers, The New York Times reports.

The Bangladesh Accord for Fire and Building Safety has more than 150 members, including the European brands H&M and Mango. The Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety counts as members 26 American and Canadian companies, including Target, Walmart, and Gap. The predominantly American alliance points out that they have done more inspections at factories than the Europe-led accord, while members of the accord argue that the alliance has lower standards. Alliance members have also said that the accord should pay wages to workers at a factory that was closed for safety reasons in March.

The rivalry is being downplayed by leaders. "This is really not a competition between the alliance and the accord," says Ellen Tauscher, chairwoman of the alliance's board. "This is about working together to change the lives of workers in Bangladesh."

Both sides do agree that conditions in many of the factories are grim; inspectors have discovered buildings so crowded with people and equipment that the columns have cracks, and fire stairways that lead to indoor work areas, not outside. It's not cheap to fix these problems; a new sprinkler system, for example, costs more than $250,000.

Dara O'Rourke, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley and an expert on workplace monitoring, says he hopes that ultimately the Bangladeshi workers end up on top. "There's one good aspect about the competition," he tells The Times. "It's pushing both sides to raise the bar on what they're doing to improve safety." Catherine Garcia

Robots
3:32 a.m. ET
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Hundreds of science and tech luminaries are freaked out about the real possibility of robotic machines that kill on their own, without a human picking the targets and pulling the trigger, and they think you should be worried, too.

On Monday, in an open letter presented at the opening of the International Joint Conference On Artificial Intelligence in Buenos Aires, physicist Stephen Hawking, Space X founder Elon Musk, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, and other prominent figures with ties to artificial intelligence (AI) warned about autonomous weapons and urged the world to enact a global ban on such human-free killing technology. The letter, organized by the Future of Life Institute, says that such technology is "feasible within years, not decades, and the stakes are high":

If any major military power pushes ahead with AI weapon development, a global arms race is virtually inevitable, and the endpoint of this technological trajectory is obvious: autonomous weapons will become the Kalashnikovs of tomorrow. Unlike nuclear weapons, they require no costly or hard-to-obtain raw materials, so they will become ubiquitous and cheap for all significant military powers to mass-produce. It will only be a matter of time until they appear on the black market and in the hands of terrorists, dictators wishing to better control their populace, warlords wishing to perpetrate ethnic cleansing, etc. [Future of Life Institute]

The signatories said they are speaking out not because they despise AI but because they believe it "has great potential to benefit humanity in many ways," so long as it doesn't include "offensive autonomous weapons beyond meaningful human control." You can read the entire letter at the Future of Life Institute. Peter Weber

The Daily Showdown
2:27 a.m. ET

What do you say when a U.S. presidential candidate manages to offend just about everyone, as former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) did Sunday by saying that President Obama's Iran nuclear deal is "marching Israelis to the door of the oven," a reference to the Nazi death camps of World War II? If you are Jon Stewart, you say nothing. On Monday's Daily Show, Stewart managed to skewer Huckabee, argue that the "Donald Trump effect" on the GOP primary is not to blame for his comment, and note his disappointment in the formerly likable politician, all in under 4 minutes and without uttering an intelligible word. You can watch the withering, silent tour de force below. Peter Weber

unfair advantage
1:43 a.m. ET

It took a former NBA star to prove to the world that carnival games aren't always rigged against the player.

Gilbert Arenas visited the Orange County Fair in Southern California over the weekend, and judging by his Instagram, won every single stuffed animal inside the fairgrounds and within a 20-mile radius. Arenas wrote in the caption that he was "banned from all the basketball hoops at #orangecountyfair," but that's not actually true, carnival operator RCS and OC Fair officials said.

While Arenas did win the maximum number of prizes — players can take home just one prize per day at each game — he isn't a persona non grata at the midway. "I'd say he looks pretty happy in the picture," Chris Lopez, vice president for RCS, told ABC7 Los Angeles. "Makes me wonder how he got all that home? Mr. Arenas is welcome back to the O.C. Fair any time, and that includes the basketball games." Catherine Garcia

history is made
12:37 a.m. ET

Jen Welter is a trailblazer — first in the Indoor Football League, and now the NFL.

Earlier this year, Welter was an assistant coach of the Indoor Football League's Texas Revolution, and believed to be the first woman to coach in a men's professional football league. On Monday, the Arizona Cardinals announced they added Welter to their staff as a coaching intern during training camp and preseason, the Los Angeles Times reports. With this new role, Welter is thought to be the first woman to ever hold a coaching position in the NFL.

"Coaching is nothing more than teaching," Cardinals Coach Bruce Arians said. "One thing I have learned from players is, 'How are you going to make me better? I don't care if you're the Green Hornet, man, I'll listen.' I really believe she'll have a great opportunity with this internship through training camp to open some doors for her." Catherine Garcia

Watch this
12:19 a.m. ET

No matter how you feel about Tom Cruise, he does one helluva lip sync. But Jimmy Fallon, as genial as he seems, is also very competitive. So their lip-sync battle on Monday's Tonight Show really feels like a battle, a rarity on Fallon's jovial Tonight Show. "This is so ridiculous," Cruise said, smiling. "I love it." He then attacked the contest as intensely as he does everything else.

Cruise started things off by nailing "Can't Feel My Face" by The Weekend, but Fallon came back with a more-than-respectable Stones song. When Cruise countered with both sides of an old Meat Loaf duet, it was pretty much over. At the end, it looked like the two performers might go for love, not war, with Fallon throwing in the towel and inviting Cruise back to do a duet to the Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," a throwback to Top Gun, but they just ended up fighting for the attention of a woman in the front row of the audience. You can watch the entire face-off below. Peter Weber

Whoa
July 27, 2015
Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

While writing a piece for The Daily Beast about Donald Trump's ex-wife Ivana using "rape" to describe an incident between the pair while they were still married, writers Tim Mak and Brandy Zazrozny asked Michael Cohen, special counsel at The Trump Organization, for comment. And boy, did they get a comment.

"You're talking about the front runner for the GOP, presidential candidate, as well as private individual who never raped anybody," Cohen said, according to The Daily Beast. "And, of course, understand that by the very definition, you can't rape your spouse.... It is true," he added. "You cannot rape your spouse. And there's very clear case law." (This is not accurate: In New York, the marital rape exemption law was struck down in 1984.)

The allegations first appeared in the 1993 book Lost Tycoon: The Many Lives of Donald J. Trump, by Harry Hurt III. Hurt wrote that Ivana stated in a deposition from their divorce proceedings that after a fight caused by Donald having scalp-reduction surgery, things turned violent and she was raped. Before the book was published, Ivana released a statement saying that while she "felt violated" and did say during the deposition that he raped her, she did "not want my words to be interpreted in a literal or criminal sense." Donald has denied the incident ever took place, and called Hurt "a guy without much talent.... He is a guy that is an unattractive guy who is a vindictive and jealous person."

Those words sound almost quaint compared to the diatribe Cohen apparently unleashed against Mak and Zazrozny. He threatened a lawsuit if the story was published, they recount, promising to "take you for every penny you still don't have. And I will come after your Daily Beast and everybody else that you possibly know. So I'm warning you, tread very f—ing lightly, because what I'm going to do to you is going to be f—ing disgusting. You understand me?" Cohen later reiterated the fact that he was ready to go to court, telling The Daily Beast: "You write a story that has Mr. Trump's name in it, with the word 'rape,' and I'm going to mess your life up...for as long as you're on this frickin' planet...you're going to have judgments against you, so much money, you'll never know how to get out from underneath it." So far, Cohen has yet to sue The Daily Beast or its reporters for every penny they still don't have. Catherine Garcia

Fires
July 27, 2015

A fire that quickly engulfed a pool at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Las Vegas on Saturday was fueled by decorative trees that are not regulated by Clark County codes.

Current codes govern structures like pool decks and cabanas, but not plants and outdoor furniture, Ron Lynn, director of the county's Department of Building and Fire Prevention, told reporters Monday. The fire started in a cabana at the Bamboo Pool, then spread to the trees, which were made from high-density foam and plastic. One person was hospitalized for smoke inhalation and another was treated at the scene. The fire was put out within 30 minutes, and the pool reopened Sunday.

Lynn said officials are still trying to get to the bottom of what caused the fire, and will likely take a close look at the role the trees played in the fire, the Las Vegas Sun reports. Lynn also said officials might need to establish new rules to control the use of fake trees. Catherine Garcia

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