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April 21, 2014
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Netflix revealed Monday that it plans to increase prices for new subscribers at some point this quarter, or before July.

In a quarterly note to shareholders, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said the plan is to raise U.S. prices by a dollar or two after a similar price hike in Ireland went smoothly. As of now, U.S. customers can stream unlimited movies and TV shows for $7.99 per month.

If you're an existing Netflix customer, don't worry — at least not yet. Hastings added in his letter that customers will stay at their current rate for a "generous time period." Jon Terbush

2:52 a.m. ET
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With President Trump overseas, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney previewed Trump's first full budget proposal on Monday. The $4.1 trillion plan won't be released until Tuesday, but Mulvaney outlined the steep cuts to Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, social services for the low-income and disabled, most federal agencies, farm subsidies, federal pension benefits, college loans, highway funds, medical research, and foreign aid, paired with billions more for the Pentagon, Veterans Affairs Department, and Homeland Security. The proposal also includes $19 billion in new spending to help states provide six weeks of paid leave for new mother and fathers, a priority for Ivanka Trump.

The proposal foresees a balanced budget in 10 years, but that relies on growth of at least 3 percent a year, widely seen as exceedingly optimistic, plus Congress passing the American Health Care Act along lines laid out in the House Republican version. Using more conventional projections, it leaves a gaping hole in the budget. The blueprint does not cut Medicare or the main part of Social Security — though the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program goes under the knife — because Trump promised not to, Mulvaney said, adding that SSDI doesn't count under the promise because for voters, "it's old age retirement that they think of when they think of Social Security," not disability benefits.

For Trump's budget plan to become reality, Congress would have to sign on. That is seen as unlikely, though Congress will probably have to take Trump's priorities into consideration. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has already panned the proposal, calling it "a budget that takes a meat cleaver to the middle class by gutting the programs that help them the most." Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) said the $866 billion in Medicaid cuts are probably DOA in the Senate. "I just think it's the prerogative of Congress to make those decisions in consultation with the president," he said. "But almost every president's budget proposal that I know of is basically dead on arrival."

Mulvaney will start trying to sell the plan to the House and Senate budget committees on Wednesday and Thursday, and he told reporters he doesn't expect Congress to enact his wish list unchanged. "If Congress has a different way to get to that endpoint, God bless them," he said. Still, "it would be nice to minimize the daylight between us and them on these things." Peter Weber

2:02 a.m. ET
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A new Department of Homeland Security report released Monday found that in 2016, more than 600,000 foreigners who entered the U.S. legally overstayed their visas, with some just one day over their limit and others never planning on leaving.

The report says that of the 50 million travelers who came to the U.S. in 2016 via air and sea, 1.25 percent overstayed their visas; they make up 40 percent of the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, USA Today reports. The Department of Homeland Security released its first report on visa overstays in January 2016, and found that in 2015, 347,632 foreigners who arrived in the U.S. through the Visa Waiver Program, B-1 business visas, or B-2 tourism visas remained in the United States after their visa expired, and that number increased by 13 percent in 2016.

"Identifying overstays is important for national security, public safety, immigration enforcement, and processing applications for immigration benefits," the report said. Catherine Garcia

1:19 a.m. ET

Richard Collins III was set to graduate from Maryland's Bowie State University on Tuesday, not long after being commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army. He was killed on Saturday in an "unprovoked attack," and his father is left trying to understand how something like this could happen.

"A parent's worst nightmare has just reached my doorstep," Richard Collins Jr. told NBC Washington. His 23-year-old son was waiting with friends for an Uber car on the University of Maryland campus when they were approached by the suspect, 22-year-old Sean Urbanski, court documents said. Witnesses told police Urbanski said, "Step left, step left if you know what's best for you," and Collins said no. Urbanski continued to walk closer, then pulled a knife out and stabbed Collins once in the chest, court documents said. Collins was pronounced dead at a local hospital, and Urbanski, after being identified by witnesses as Collins' attacker, was arrested while sitting at a bus stop. Urbanski has been charged with murder and assault, and a judge on Monday ruled he should be held without bond because he was "an absolute danger to the community."

After it was discovered that Urbanski was a member of a Facebook group called Alt-Reich Nation, University of Maryland Police Chief David Mitchell asked the FBI for help determining if the incident was a hate crime. Meanwhile, Collins' father is remembering how his son could "make friends no matter what group he was around" and enjoyed running and playing soccer and lacrosse. The younger Collins was a competitive athlete who had a "loving and giving heart," his father told NBC Washington. "He would go out of his way, sometimes to my chagrin, to try and help others. But you want to try to encourage that in your children." Catherine Garcia

12:59 a.m. ET

An explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, killed at least 19 people and wounded 50 while Monday's Late Late Show was taping, and host James Corden sat down after the audience left to offer his condolences and thoughts. "It shocks me every time we hear this sort of news, that attacks like this can happen, but especially when there will be so many children at this concert tonight," he said.

Most of his U.S. viewers won't have been to Manchester, he said, but they will know something about it: Its famous soccer teams, its musical history as the birthplace of both Oasis and Joy Division, among other bands. "But when I think of Manchester, the place that I know, I think of the spirit of the people there, and I'm telling you a more tight-knit group of people you will be hard-pressed to find," Corden said. "Strong, proud, caring people, with community as its core. And if it was even possible, the spirit of the people of Manchester will grow even stronger this evening." You can watch his monologue below. Peter Weber

12:32 a.m. ET

On Sunday in Saudi Arabia, King Salman led President Trump on a tour of the new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology, and the ceremony included some odd moments. Yeah, "this is, without question, the strangest thing I've ever seen a president do," Jimmy Kimmel said on Monday's Kimmel Live, playing some footage of Trump, Salman, and Egypt's president touching a glowing white orb. He made an Access Hollywood joke, then said the orb-fondling appears to be "their version of a ribbon-cutting ceremony over there? But I have to say, the president seemed kind of different after he touched it." Kimmel cut to Trump, doctored in a disturbing way, speaking, and ended with an explanation for that sinkhole opening up in front of Mar-a-Lago. Watch below. Peter Weber

12:12 a.m. ET
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Several al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula militants were killed early Tuesday morning as U.S. military forces conducted a ground raid in central Yemen's Marib Governorate.

Colonel John Thomas, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command, said the raid at a known AQAP compound began as a mission to gather information on the group, but when U.S. forces were met with resistance, they responded with gunfire and precision air strikes, ABC News reports. Seven AQAP militants were killed, but there are no reports of any civilian or U.S. military casualties.

Thomas said the mission, the first ground operation conducted by the U.S. military in Marib province, was done "in full coordination with Arab partners in the area." Catherine Garcia

12:05 a.m. ET
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The Golden State Warriors are heading to their third straight NBA Finals, after completing a four-game sweep of the San Antonio Spurs with a 129-115 win in San Antonio on Monday night. The Warriors, who haven't lost a playoff game since Game 7 of last year's finals against the Cleveland Cavaliers, are the first team in NBA history to start the playoffs with a 12-0 record. Stephen Curry scored 36 points for the Warriors, while Kyle Anderson led the injury-plagued Spurs with 20 points; Spurs great Manu Ginobili, who notched 15 points in what is likely his final NBA game, got a standing ovation when he walked off court in the fourth quarter.

The Cavs are facing the Boston Celtics in Game 4 on Tuesday, with a 2-1 series lead, and if they prevail, the Warriors and Cavs would be the first teams to face each other for three consecutive Finals. Peter Weber

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