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April 21, 2014
Getty Images/CHUNG SUNG-JUN

On Monday, South Korea's president blasted the actions of the captain and crew of the ferry that sank last Wednesday for committing "unforgivable, murderous behavior." The captain, 68-year-old Lee Joon-seok, is being heavily criticized for telling passengers to stay in their rooms as the ferry started sinking and allegedly waiting a half hour before issuing evacuation orders. The disaster left more than 300 people, mostly teenagers on a school trip, missing or dead.

"What the captain and part of the crew did is unfathomable from the viewpoint of common sense, unforgivable, murderous behavior," said President Park Geun-hye at a briefing. She denounced Lee's decision to ignore marine traffic controllers' instructions to help passengers escape as he and some of the crew became among the first to be rescued from the doomed vessel. "Legally and ethically," she said, "this is an unimaginable act."

The president's comments came while Lee and two crew members are under arrest for suspicion of negligence. An additional four crew members were detained Monday. Jordan Valinsky

3:31 p.m. ET
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Parkland school shooting survivor David Hogg, 18, blasted Donald Trump Jr. as "immature, rude, and inhumane" after the president's eldest son "liked" conspiracy theories on Twitter that allege Hogg had been fed talking points by his father, who is a former FBI agent. Hogg movingly called for Congress to act to stop gun violence last week, looking into CNN's cameras directly and insisting: "Without action, ideas stay ideas and children die."

A number of pro-Trump websites, including One America News and Gateway Pundit, pushed the theory that Hogg "is running cover for his dad." Speaking to BuzzFeed News, Hogg said it was "immature, rude, and inhumane for these people to destroy the people trying to prevent the death of the future of America because they won't."

"I just think it's a testament to the sick immaturity and broken state of our government when these people feel the need to peddle conspiracy theories about people that were in a school shooting where 17 people died," Hogg said. "It just makes me sick." Jeva Lange

3:24 p.m. ET
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

A report published Tuesday by UNICEF found that every year, 1 million newborn babies do not live past their first day. The report also found that 2.6 million babies die before they have lived even a month.

More often than not, newborn mortality is greatly determined by where the baby was born. Henrietta H. Fore, UNICEF's executive director, said Tuesday that "babies born to the poorest families are more than 40 percent more likely to die in the newborn period than babies in the richest families."

The shame is that most of these deaths are preventable, UNICEF explains. More than 80 percent of the deaths are tied to premature births, "complications during labor and delivery," and inadequate health care to treat said complications. In other words, they are circumstantial deaths, rather than medical issues that doctors could not address.

High-income countries average just three deaths for every 1,000 births, whereas low-income countries report 27 fatalities for every 1,000 births. But economic prosperity is not the only determinant of newborn mortality: UNICEF points out that the U.S. and Kuwait, two wealthy countries, each report four newborn deaths for every 1,000 births, a rate that is comparatively outperformed by "lower-middle income" countries like Sri Lanka and Rwanda, which report five deaths per 1,000 births.

The lesson, UNICEF contends, is that "[investing] in strong health-care systems that prioritize newborns … can make a major difference, even where resources are constrained." Rwanda in particular — a poor country that has recently halved its newborn mortality rate — should "offer hope and lessons for other countries committed to keeping every child alive," the report says.

Read the full report here. Kelly O'Meara Morales

3:04 p.m. ET

In an interview Tuesday with India's CNBC TV18, Donald Trump Jr. praised the "spirit" of people living in poverty in India. The eldest son of President Trump made the remarks during a press tour promoting luxury Trump Tower apartments being built in New Delhi.

"I don't mean to be glib about it," Trump Jr. said, "but you can see the poorest of the poor [in India], and there's still a smile on a face." He continued: "It's a different spirit that you don't see in other parts of the world, where people walk around so solemn.”

The president's son went on to say that the unbending positivity of even the poorest people in India "speaks to the future potential of what this country can do." Trump Jr. said that at first, he "couldn't understand" the resilient attitudes, but after visiting India several times he realized, "It's not a show."

Trump Jr. added that he was well aware of the "hardships" the poorest people in India face, but he insisted that "there is something that is different about the people here that I have not seen to the same level in other parts of the emerging world." Watch below. Kelly O'Meara Morales

2:19 p.m. ET

A member of Louisiana's Tangipahoa Parish School Board said Tuesday that he is "saddened by the misplaced reaction" to a disturbing meme he posted on Facebook. The image featured a noose and the text "if we want to make America great again, we will have to make evil people fear punishment again," The Advocate reports.

The post, which Mike Whitlow shared after the Florida school shooting, provoked a statement from local councilman Louis Joseph, who said: "I am extremely offended by his post as we all know the history and meaning of the hangman's noose, especially as it pertains to African-Americans. As a member of the school board, what message are you sending to the students, employees, and parents of our school system, let alone people that may be considering moving into our parish?"

The meme appears to have originated in October 2017 on a page called Weapons Vault, a pro-gun and Second Amendment Facebook group, New Orleans' WWL-TV reports. "Yesterday, I came across an article on Facebook that advocated for such stiffer sentences for violence offenses and simply shared the article on my personal Facebook page," Whitlow said. "The article had no racial or discriminatory tones whatsoever."

He deleted the noose meme, adding: "I apologize to anyone who was offended by a post I recently shared." Jeva Lange

1:54 p.m. ET
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Our eyeballs apparently contain information that could revolutionize cardiovascular medicine.

Artificial intelligence software developed by Google in conjunction with its biotech subsidiary company Verily can scan retinal images to predict heart disease at nearly the same accuracy rate as a traditional blood test, United Press International reports. The findings, published Monday in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, explain that Google's AI makes its predictions by examining images of the back of a patient's eye in order to develop a profile of the patient, including several characteristics that could determine cardiovascular risk.

From the retinal images, Google's AI can determine within impressive degrees of accuracy a patient's age, gender, blood pressure, and smoking status, as well as even the past occurrence of major cardiovascular events, The Verge explains. The program taught itself how to analyze eyeballs after using machine learning techniques to pore over more than 284,000 retinal images; while studying, the AI used what UPI describes as a visual "heatmap" to learn which parts of the eye's anatomy contained certain predictive factors. The AI eventually learned, for example, that to analyze a patient's blood pressure, it was prudent to examine the blood vessels in the eye.

To test its capabilities, researchers sicced the AI on two patient pools, totaling more than 13,000 patients. The AI made correct predictions on the future risk of heart disease in 70 percent of cases — nearly the same accuracy rate as the blood-test method doctors traditionally use, which has a 72 percent accuracy rate.

Harlan M. Krumholz, the director of Yale's Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, predicted that the findings of Google's AI show that machine learning and artificial intelligence will "more precisely hone our understanding of disease and individuals," helping physicians "understand these processes and diagnoses in ways that we haven't been able to before." Read the full study here. Kelly O'Meara Morales

1:39 p.m. ET
ABDULMONAM EASSA/AFP/Getty Images

Human rights monitors report that nearly 200 people have been killed in the rebel-held region of Eastern Ghouta, Syria, in the past 48 hours, with Monday marking the bloodiest single day since an alleged chemical attack in the region in 2015, CNN reports. "What is a greater terrorism than killing civilians with all sorts of weapons?" one doctor working in the region asked The Guardian. "Is this a war? It's not a war. It's called a massacre."

Although Eastern Ghouta has been a target of the Syrian regime for more than five years, the region was officially declared a safe "de-escalation" zone for civilians in a deal between Russia, Turkey, and Iran last year. All that is now a distant memory: "Residents of Eastern Ghouta are bracing themselves for what they believe is an imminent ground invasion by Syrian regime forces," CNN writes. "They said that events in their suburb are playing out similarly to the 2016 offensive in Aleppo, when rebels and [Islamic State] militants were expelled by a government offensive that reduced much of the city to rubble."

At least four hospitals, and possibly as many as seven, have reportedly been destroyed in the shelling and airstrikes. "We are standing before the massacre of the 21st century," the doctor who spoke with The Guardian warned.

Over the past three months, more than 700 people have been killed in Eastern Ghouta, which is home to some 400,000 civilians. The last week marked what Amnesty International called "flagrant war crimes" on an "epic scale." In a statement Monday, the CEO of the Union of Medical Care & Relief Organizations, Zaidoun al-Zoabi, said: "This could be one of the worst attacks in Syrian history, even worse than the siege on Aleppo. The sheer intensity of airstrikes is leveling the city, and killing civilians without any regard or mercy." Jeva Lange

12:23 p.m. ET

CNN's Chris Cuomo was barely able to mask his outrage during an interview Tuesday with Republican House candidate Tyler Tannahill, who has refused to suspend his campaign's AR-15 giveaway contest even after the same weapon was used to kill 17 people at a Parkland, Florida, high school last week. "Help me understand, brother," Cuomo said. "Why, after this, would you want to give away the same weapon used to kill all those kids?"

Tannahill, a candidate for Congress in Kansas, announced the giveaway on Feb. 13, a day before the Valentine's Day shooting. After the attack, he said his campaign considered what he called "the typical Republican response: 'Let's hide in our holes, let's say thoughts and prayers and move on.'" He said they ultimately decided against it: "We do have a problem, we have to protect our students, we have to protect our teachers," he told Cuomo.

An emotional Cuomo tried to offer some perspective. "God forbid you knew somebody who was in that school," he said. "And then, right on the heels of [the shooting], when you're trying to get your mind around this madness, there's a guy giving away the same damn weapon that just took your loved one's life."

Cuomo added: "You think that would be seen as a constructive step forward in a conversation about how to stop it, or a slap in the face, and somebody just shaming you with what you had to live through?" Watch the tense exchange below. Jeva Lange

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