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April 19, 2014
AP Photo/Petros Karadjias

Officials from the international mission tasked with monitoring Syria's chemical weapons disarmament say the operation is running on schedule.

"The renewed pace in movements is positive," Sigrid Kaag, special coordinator of the joint mission between the United Nations and the OPCW, told Reuters. "(It is) necessary to ensure progress towards a tight deadline."

That deadline — April 27 — is quickly approaching, but Kaag said Syria had shipped out or destroyed nearly 80 percent of its declared chemical weapons material. The international community pressured Syria to give up its chemical weapons cache after a sarin gas attack killed hundreds of people in the country last August.

The pace is all the more impressive as the United States and Russia are currently at odds over Moscow's involvement in Ukraine. The two countries had worked together last September to ensure cooperation from Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on removing the country's chemical weapons materials, with Russian President Vladimir Putin ultimately securing the agreement.

Even as Syria moves more of its stockpiled chemical weapons out, though, reports continue to surface of new chemical weapons attacks in the country. The government and rebel forces are trading accusations over the most recent alleged incident; a chlorine gas attack which both sides agree took place in the central village of Kafr Zeita.

Should Syria succeed in moving out 100 percent of its declared chemical weapons material by the deadline, the international community will need to bear in mind that key word, anyway: Declared. Sarah Eberspacher

11:11 a.m. ET
Andreas Solaro/Getty Images

Pope Francis on Saturday celebrated Mass with a crowd of about 15,000 in Cairo, Egypt, a visit made at the invitation of Sheikh Ahmed el-Tayeb, Grand Imam of al-Azhar and a leading moderate cleric and academic of Sunni Islam. The trip follows the Palm Sunday bombings of two Coptic Orthodox churches in Egypt that claimed at least 45 lives.

"God is pleased only by a faith that is proclaimed by our lives, for the only fanaticism believers can have is that of charity!" Francis said in his homily. "Any other fanaticism does not come from God and is not pleasing to him."

Francis will visit the Egyptian Catholic community later Saturday. His has used his visit to Egypt to urge peaceful coexistence between Christians and Muslims. Bonnie Kristian

11:04 a.m. ET
Lionel Bonaventure/Getty Images

The Turkish government has blocked access to Wikipedia, watchdog organizations said Saturday.

"After technical analysis and legal consideration based on the Law Nr. 5651 [governing the internet], an administrative measure has been taken for this website," said a statement from the Turkish Information and Communication Technologies Authority, which did not provide an official reason for the block. The law the statement cited permits the government to ban websites deemed obscene or threatening to national security.

Turkish media reported authorities took issue with Wikipedia content "supporting terror" (or perhaps suggesting ties between Turkey and terrorist groups). When Wikipedia refused to remove the content in question, local stories said, the ban was Ankara's retaliation.

This move comes two weeks after a referendum vote gave Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan expansive new powers. Bonnie Kristian

8:23 a.m. ET
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President Trump hit the 100-day mark of his presidency Saturday, a milestone he enthusiastically hailed in his weekly address the afternoon before.

"I truly believe that the first 100 days of my administration has been just about the most successful in our country's history," Trump said in the brief video. "Our country is going up, and it's going up fast. Our companies are doing better. They just announced fantastic profits all because of what's happened in this rather short period of time, and that's just the beginning."

While other assessments of Trump's first 100 days have been rather more mixed, Trump is indisputably leading by one metric: He has signed more executive orders so far than any president since Harry Truman. Trump will spend his 100th day signing yet another order, this one ordering a study of the effects of current U.S. trade agreements, including the World Trade Organization. Bonnie Kristian

7:56 a.m. ET
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President Trump signed a one-week spending bill Friday night after both houses of Congress voted to approve the measure just hours before the midnight deadline to avert a government shutdown.

"I'm disappointed that it doesn't go quicker," Trump said of working with Congress earlier Friday. "It is a very tough system." The stopgap measure had been put in jeopardy by a White House push to pass health-care reform before the administration's 100th day Saturday, but House leadership chose to delay a health-care vote until at least next week, paving the way for the bipartisan spending bill.

The federal government is now funded through May 5, by which point lawmakers expect to pass a $1 trillion spending bill financing Washington through the end of September. Bonnie Kristian

April 28, 2017
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Thousands are expected to gather Saturday in Washington, D.C., on President Trump's 100th day in office for the 2017 People's Climate March. Activists are hailing the event as an opportunity to fight for climate protections the Trump administration has threatened to roll back and to push the promise of clean energy. "The climate movement will convene in D.C. to show that the election didn't cancel physics," said climate activist and author Bill McKibben, who helped organize the first iteration of the People's Climate March, which took place in New York in 2014.

The march — which happens to fall on what could be a record-breakingly hot day in D.C. — will begin in front of the Capitol at 12:30 p.m ET. Protesters are expected to make their way to the White House by 2 p.m. ET.

This will be the second science-related march in two weeks in D.C., following last weekend's March for Science, which coincided with Earth Day. Becca Stanek

April 28, 2017

Late night television is marking the occasion of President Trump's first 100 days in office by condensing four months of news into just seconds.

For a walk down memory lane, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert packed everything into 100 seconds, beginning with "inauguration" and "largest audience" and ending with "tax plan" and "harder than he thought." Some repetitions stand out — the amount of times people say "Russia," for example, is a little concerning:

The Daily Show also did its own take on Trump's first 100 days in a supercut of White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer counting from zero to 100. It is, incredibly, a lot more entertaining than it sounds:

Not to be left out of the fun, The Simpsons also brutally encapsulated Trump's first 100 days in a short clip you can watch here. Jeva Lange

April 28, 2017
Spencer Platt/Newsmakers

A group of Columbia University students draped a Ku Klux Klan hood over a statue of Thomas Jefferson and labeled the Founding Father "the epitome of white supremacy." Protesters from the group Mobilized African Diaspora said the statue of the slave-holding Founding Father "validates rape, sexual violence, and racism" and shows Columbia's "hypocrisy" in recruiting black students as "mere tokens of the university." The Week Staff

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