April 17, 2014

Robin Williams is strapping on the body suit and reapplying his makeup to reprise his role as the eponymous nanny from the '90s comedy Mrs. Doubtfire, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Fox 2000 is developing a sequel to the 1993 film that will reportedly feature the comedian. Chris Columbus, who shot the original, will return to direct based on a script from Elf writer David Berenbaum.

The original film, which won an Oscar for Best Makeup and inspired numerous nostalgic BuzzFeed listicles, starred Williams as a hapless divorcee who pretends to be a Scottish nanny so he can visit his kids unbeknownst to his ex-wife. Yet the movie ends on a conclusive note, so it's uncertain how a sequel will advance the plot in a convincing way to make the next installment more than just Williams yammering in drag for 90 minutes.

Mara Wilson, who starred in the original, shared the same concern:

Here's to hoping the film is genuinely funny and more believable than a run-by fruiting. Jon Terbush

9:17 p.m. ET

The world has shooting to thank for the Eric Trump we know today.

On Monday, President Trump's middle son responded to a Fox and Friends tweet about a New Jersey high school that allegedly suspended students over a photo taken at a gun range. "This is sad," Trump tweeted. "Shooting was a big part of my youth – it kept me away from drinking/drugs, taught me safety, discipline, consentration [sic], and so many other positive life lessons. It has brought generations of children together with parents, grandparents, and other role models."

Several Twitter users helpfully pointed out that shooting didn't help Trump with his spelling, and also blasted him for a 2012 hunting trip to Zimbabwe, where he was photographed alongside his brother Donald Trump Jr., holding a dead leopard. Catherine Garcia

8:38 p.m. ET
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The teen accessories chain Claire's filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Monday, and will close 92 stores this month and in April.

The company announced it has reached an agreement with creditors to restructure $1.9 billion in debt, and is "confident" it will emerge from bankruptcy protection in September. The chain has 1,600 locations in the United States, mostly in malls, which don't have the foot traffic they used to, due to competition from big box stores and online merchants. Just remember this: You may be able to buy glittery nail polish and bejeweled headbands online, but good luck getting Siri to pierce your ears. Catherine Garcia

7:50 p.m. ET
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In a blow to Republicans ahead of the 2018 midterms, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a challenge to Pennsylvania's newly drawn congressional map.

In January, the state Supreme Court ruled that the map drawn by Republicans in 2011 was gerrymandered and violated Pennsylvania's constitution, and last month, voted 4-3 to approve a new congressional map that no longer favors the GOP. Under the old map, Republicans usually won 13 of the 18 districts, but with the new boundaries, Democrats are likely to pick up three or four seats. Catherine Garcia

7:02 p.m. ET
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Attorneys for President Trump have given Special Counsel Robert Mueller's office written documents about events under investigation, including summaries of internal White House memos and correspondence, with the hopes that this will keep Mueller from having to ask about certain incidents, two people familiar with the situation told The Washington Post.

Trump's lawyers are concerned that Trump being able to handle an interview that could last several hours, and have been negotiating the terms of a one-on-one meeting. The records do not detail Trump's version of events, the Post reports, but rather the White House view, and include documents related to the firing of former FBI Director James Comey. Mueller is investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election, and if the Trump campaign coordinated with Russian officials and if Trump obstructed justice by trying to interfere with the probe. Catherine Garcia

5:36 p.m. ET
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President Trump's longtime personal lawyer Michael Cohen told his side of the Stormy Daniels story in a Vanity Fair interview published Monday, describing the negotiations that led to the now-infamous $130,000 payment to the adult film actress.

Cohen told Vanity Fair that, until 2011, he didn't know that Trump had ever met Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford. But when a website published an interview about the alleged affair between the former real estate developer and porn star, Cohen says that Daniels' former attorney, Keith Davidson, called him to work on getting the story removed.

When Trump's presidency placed new scrutiny on rumors of the alleged affair in 2016, Cohen called Davidson to get ahead of newfound media interest. Cohen asked Davidson how much it would cost to "own the story" and keep Daniels from talking to media outlets that were sniffing around the alleged scandal. Davidson told Cohen that she wanted $130,000, a number that Cohen says he found strange in its apparent randomness.

Cohen says that when he asked Davidson why Daniels would talk to media outlets in 2016, when she had denied reports of the affair half a decade ago, the answer was that "she needed the money." Davidson declined to comment to Vanity Fair on the matter.

Trump has consistently denied that he was ever involved with Daniels. Read Cohen's entire interview — in which he also discusses an impromptu meeting he had with Daniels' current lawyer, Michael Avenatti — at Vanity Fair. Summer Meza

4:28 p.m. ET

President Trump pushed his proposed border wall as a method to combat the national opioid crisis in a speech in New Hampshire on Monday.

"Ninety percent of the heroin in America comes from our southern border," said Trump. "Eventually the Democrats will agree with us, and we'll build the wall to keep the damn drugs out."

His call for additional border security elicited a standing ovation from the audience, who cheered and chanted in support of a wall. Attendees also applauded the president's pledge to deploy the death penalty for drug dealers, whom he called "terrible people."

In his remarks, Trump additionally slammed sanctuary cities, which shield some immigrants from deportation by allowing local authorities to decline to cooperate with federal immigration officers. The president said that removing sanctuary policies was crucial to stopping the opioid crisis, saying that they "shield dangerous criminals" who are responsible for drug dealing. Other strategies mentioned were "commercials" to deter children from trying drugs and battling pharmaceutical companies who push to overprescribe pain medications.

Watch Trump's comments on the border wall below, via Fox News. Summer Meza

3:22 p.m. ET

Senior executives at Cambridge Analytica and its parent company, Strategic Communications Laboratories, were apparently secretly filmed by Britain's Channel 4 News suggesting they have used bribes and other shady techniques to influence more than 200 elections across the globe. Cambridge Analytica was a Trump campaign contractor in 2016, and it was reported this weekend that the company harvested 50 million American Facebook profiles for electioneering, a major data breach.

In order to get the footage, a Channel 4 News reporter "posed as a fixer for a wealthy client hoping to get candidates elected in Sri Lanka." In one clip, Cambridge Analytica's chief executive, Alexander Nix, appears to suggest to the undercover reporter that he could "send some girls around to the candidate's house" as a means of getting dirt on the opponent, adding Ukrainians "are very beautiful, I find that works very well."

Cambridge Analytica's global political managing director, Mark Turnbull, was also included in the meetings, and he talked about putting "information into the bloodstream of the internet" and said "it has to happen without anyone thinking, 'That's propaganda,' because the moment you think [that] the next question is, 'Who's put that out?'"

Nix additionally expressed an eagerness to work with the undercover reporter. "We're used to operating through different vehicles, in the shadows," he said, "and I look forward to building a very long-term and secretive relationship with you."

A Cambridge Analytica spokesman said: "We entirely refute any allegation that Cambridge Analytica or any of its affiliates use entrapment, bribes, or so-called 'honey-traps' for any purpose whatsoever" and that "we routinely undertake conversations with prospective clients to try to tease out any unethical or illegal intentions." Watch below, and read more about the undercover investigation via Channel 4 News here. Jeva Lange

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