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April 10, 2014
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The smell emanating from a Sriracha hot sauce factory in Irwindale, Calif., is becoming too much for its neighbors to take in, and the town's city council is taking action. Declaring the plant a public nuisance, the council gave The Huy Fong Foods factory, which churns out 100 million pounds of the spicy sauce annually, three months to mitigate the smell — or else.

Since at least the fall of last year, residents have complained to Irwindale that the factory's odors burn their eyes and cause coughing fits throughout the day. The city even won a lawsuit against the plant in November, forcing it to "partially cease operations," but it looks like the council wants more done. The unanimous vote last night was the equivalent of an ultimatum, giving the factory 90 days to reduce the odor before officials order mandatory changes.

An attorney for the company said the city was "flexing its muscle and thumbing Huy Fong in the eye." Nevertheless, they are working with air quality experts to have the problem solved by June 1 — so no need to start stockpiling the sauce just yet. Jordan Valinsky

2:19 p.m. ET

Larry David and Bernie Sanders appeared alongside each other on Saturday Night Live, but the real highlight of the night didn't involve Sanders at all. In this pre-taped sketch, watch David play a cranky, neurotic Sanders in the cleverly titled "Bern Your Enthusiasm." Julie Kliegman

1:48 p.m. ET
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The United Nations Security Council condemned North Korea on Sunday for defying international warnings in launching a long-range rocket that many believe is a cover for a test of a ballistic missile that could reach the United States mainland.

All 15 Security Council members approved a statement at an emergency meeting emphasizing that using ballistic missile technology violates four resolutions, The Associated Press reports. The group also vowed to adopt a new resolution soon with "significant" sanctions for North Korea. Julie Kliegman

1:18 p.m. ET
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In a Monmouth University poll released Sunday, Donald Trump leads the Republican field with 30 percent of the support from likely New Hampshire primary voters. Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush are tied for 13 percent, with Ted Cruz notching 12 percent.

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders leads Hillary Clinton, 52 percent to 42 percent.

The poll's margin of error is 4.4 percentage points. On Tuesday, New Hampshire will be the second state to vote in the primaries. Julie Kliegman

12:28 p.m. ET
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Bernie Sanders distanced himself Sunday from "Berniebros," a wide-ranging term that some have used to describe sexist supporters of the Vermont senator.

"It's disgusting," he said on CNN's State of the Union. "We don't want that crap. Anybody who is supporting me and doing sexist things, we don't want them. I don't want them. That's not what this campaign is about."

See more of Sanders' interview here. Julie Kliegman

11:45 a.m. ET

Saturday night's Republican presidential debate featured a lot of heated conflict — once all of the candidates finally made it out on stage. Watch The Washington Post break down just how delightfully awkward the whole introduction process was. Julie Kliegman

11:26 a.m. ET

At Saturday's Republican presidential debate, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio attacked President Obama. A lot. To be exact, Rubio attacked Obama four times with some version of, "Let's dispel with this fiction that Barack Obama doesn't know what he's doing. He knows exactly what he's doing."

His performance was widely mocked.

But Sunday on ABC's This Week, Rubio stood by his talking point.

"It's what I believe and it's what I'm going to continue to say, because it happens to be one of the main reasons why I am running," he said.

In other words, Rubio knows exactly what he's doing. Julie Kliegman

11:00 a.m. ET

Beyoncé released a new single and music video Saturday, marking her first major release since she surprise-dropped her self-titled album in 2013. "Formation," which heavily references Hurricane Katrina and the Black Lives Matter movement, centers on black pride.

Two filmmakers have called out Beyoncé, claiming she used footage from their documentary, That B.E.A.T., without permission, The New York Times reports.

Beyoncé's representative countered that the footage is properly licensed. Julie Kliegman

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