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April 9, 2014

More mothers in the U.S. are staying home to raise their children than in 2000, an unusual rise documented in a new survey from the Pew Research Center. But the increase to 29 percent, from a low of 23 percent 14 years ago, doesn't mean women are putting their outside careers on hold en masse. And the ones who are, through choice or necessity, aren't the "opt-out" moms fussed over in the media.

After Decades of Decline, a Rising Share of Stay-at-Home Mothers

In fact, stay-at-home moms (SAHMs, colloquially) are typically younger, poorer, and less-educated than mothers who work outside of the home; almost half aren't white, and a third immigrated to the U.S.:

And those "opt-out mothers"?

In 2012, nearly 370,000 U.S. married stay-at-home mothers (with working husbands) had at least a master’s degree and family income exceeding $75,000. This group accounted for 5 percent of married stay-at-home mothers with working husbands.... These women stand out from other married stay-at-home mothers in that they are disproportionately white or Asian. About seven-in-ten (69 percent) are white, and fully 19 percent are Asian. Only 7 percent are Hispanic, and 3 percent are black. [Pew]

There are a lot of fascinating data points in the report, especially if you're interested in why women stay home and which demographics believe that's better for kids. But I'll leave you with this intriguing chart:

To understand why SAHMs apparently spend only seven hours a week more on child care (and nine more on housework) than their working-outside-the-home peers, turn to Chapter 3, not Gwyneth Paltrow. Peter Weber

8:48 a.m. ET

After Senate Republicans failed to repeal ObamaCare, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks (Ala.) on Friday morning suggested that it might be time for a change in party leadership. Brooks urged Senate Republicans not to quit pushing to repeal and replace ObamaCare, but he said that if they're willing to quit, maybe some Republicans should quit too. "If they're gonna quit, well then by golly, maybe they ought to start at the top with Mitch McConnell leaving his position and letting somebody new, somebody bold, somebody conservative take the reins," Brooks said on CNN's New Day.

"You think the problem is leadership? You think it's time for a change?" CNN's Chris Cuomo clarified. Brooks responded by noting that "unquestionably, the leadership at the top is responsible" for the failed repeal vote. "If Mitch McConnell cannot get the job done on this, how is he going to get the job done on the rest of President Trump's agenda over the next three and a half years?" Brooks said.

Brooks insisted that it isn't "necessarily anything bad about Mitch McConnell," but "he's got a job to do." "And if he can't do it, then as The Apprentice would say, 'You're fired,' and get somebody who can," Brooks said.

Watch it below. Becca Stanek

7:44 a.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) apparently made a dramatic entrance into the Senate chamber just before he cast his ObamaCare repeal-killing vote. Politico reported that as McCain walked in for the Senate vote on rolling back the Affordable Care Act, he "tantalizingly hinted": "Watch the show."

And what a show it was. Once inside the chamber, McCain, who Republicans say was waffling all day on his vote, walked up to a group of Democrats to announce he'd be voting against Republicans' plan to repeal ObamaCare. "Let's get this over with. I really want to do [the National Defense Authorization Act]," McCain, eager to move onto the next piece of legislation, reportedly said. He reportedly "embraced" Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.).

He then voted no, joining Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) and Susan Collins (Maine) in killing their party's seven-year mission to undo ObamaCare in the wee hours of Friday morning. McCain cast his vote despite pleading talks with the party's top leadership, from House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Vice President Mike Pence on up to President Trump.

Politico reported that Republicans were so shocked after the vote they "could barely speak."

Read more about McCain's fateful vote at Politico. Becca Stanek

5:41 a.m. ET

Early Friday morning, the GOP's seven-year mission to kill ObamaCare ended with a dramatic thumbs-down, when Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) strode into the Senate chamber and cast a surprising no vote on his party's third attempt this week to roll back the Affordable Care Act:

McCain's vote prompted gasps from his assembled colleagues — and proved decisive in killing the bill. He joined Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) and Susan Collins (Maine) in dissent, along with all Democrats, and the proposal was defeated 49-51. A disappointed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said, "It's time to move on."

Read more about how McCain ended up casting the deciding vote at Politico. Kimberly Alters

3:20 a.m. ET

It's time to say hello again to the Tanners, Winslows, Balki, and Mr. Cooper — every single season of TGIF favorites Full House, Family Matters, Step by Step, Perfect Strangers, and Hangin' With Mr. Cooper are coming to Hulu.

The company announced Thursday it will exclusively stream all of the series in their entireties — more than 800 shows — beginning Sept. 29. ABC's iconic Friday night line-up went through a few iterations, and some popular TGIF programs aren't part of the deal — where's Boy Meets World? Sabrina the Teenage Witch? — but for '90s kids, this is still fantastic news. "These shows are more than just beloved hits, they were part of a cultural tradition to tune in every Friday night," Hulu's Craig Erwich said. "Now, it can be Friday any day of the week on Hulu." Catherine Garcia

2:57 a.m. ET

What a difference a few hours makes.

Before the final vote on an ObamaCare repeal, President Trump tweeted words of encouragement for GOP members of the Senate:

After the bill was defeated 51-49, thanks to Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona, Susan Collins of Maine, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska voting with Democrats, Trump was back on Twitter with this message:

He might be regretting this post from Tuesday:

But probably not as much as saying this in 2015:

McCain hasn't hinted he voted against the bill as a way of getting back at Trump — in a statement, he said he was a no because the repeal "offered no replacement to actually reform our health-care system and deliver affordable quality health care to our citizens" — but it does make you wonder. Catherine Garcia

2:24 a.m. ET

After spending seven years promising a repeal of ObamaCare, Senate Republicans on Friday morning were unable to pass their latest version of a health-care proposal, the Health Care Freedom Act, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) declared "it's time to move on."

With three Republican senators — Susan Collins of Maine, John McCain of Arizona, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — joining Democrats in voting against the plan, it failed by one vote in what was "clearly a disappointing moment," McConnell said. He claimed that due to "skyrocketing costs," "plummeting choices," and "collapsing markets, our constituents have suffered through an awful lot under ObamaCare. We thought they deserved better."

McConnell also praised Republicans for "working hard" on the bill, which wasn't finalized until Thursday, and accused Senate Democrats of "not wanting to engage in a serious way to help those suffering under ObamaCare." Catherine Garcia

1:52 a.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) joined Democrats in voting no early Friday morning for the Republicans' last-ditch effort to repeal ObamaCare, with the bill failing on a vote of 49 to 51.

The bill, dubbed the Health Care Freedom Act, would have repealed ObamaCare's individual and employer mandates, defunded Planned Parenthood for a year, and allowed states to request waivers from benefits mandated by ObamaCare. It was the third defeat for the GOP this week, with two earlier proposals to repeal ObamaCare failing, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said it's now "time to move on."

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said he is "relieved millions and millions of people who would have been so drastically hurt by the three proposals put forward will at least retain their health care, be able to deal with pre-existing conditions ... We are relieved, not for ourselves, but for the American people." Catherine Garcia

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