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April 1, 2014
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Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Tuesday released his proposed budget for the 2015 fiscal year, and it promises to save more than $5 trillion over a decade. So where do those savings come from? Largely from repealing ObamaCare.

In fairness, the proposed budget is a dream blueprint of federal spending, not an actual proposal. Democrats have no intention of acting on it, so the Path to Prosperity is essentially no more than a political document for Republicans to tout on the campaign trail this year.

Yet to project massive savings on the far-fetched idea that ObamaCare will completely disappear — as Ryan did in past budget proposals as well — is a disingenuous accounting trick. Republicans have held dozens of repeal votes, all for naught. Meanwhile, ObamaCare enrollments surged on Monday — possibly hitting the administration's target of seven million — and support for the health care law is rising. There are still questions about how successful the law will be once people actually move onto their new insurance plans, but there is simply no reason to believe ObamaCare will vanish and deliver the massive savings Ryan projects. Jon Terbush

1:39 a.m. ET

In 2008, when Barack Obama became the first African-American presidential nominee, his opponent, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), released an ad congratulating him on making history.

"Sen. Obama, this is truly a good day for America," McCain said. "Too often, the achievements of our opponents go unnoticed, so I wanted to stop and say congratulations. How perfect that your nomination would come on this historic day. Tomorrow we'll be back at it, but tonight, Senator, job well done."

On Thursday, when Hillary Clinton became the first woman to ever become the presidential nominee of a major party, that didn't happen — but this did. Catherine Garcia

12:59 a.m. ET

So many balloons fell from the ceiling at the end of her speech at the Democratic National Convention Thursday night that Hillary Clinton seemingly didn't know what to do with them all.

She pointed at some:

Grabbed others:

Stared in awe at a few:

Looked at some like they were Donald Trump:

Walked gingerly through a sea of many:

And finally just disappeared for awhile:

Meanwhile, former President Bill Clinton was playing it cool.

Catherine Garcia

12:28 a.m. ET
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Donald Trump seemed to hardly know where to begin after Hillary Clinton's Democratic National Convention speech Thursday night. So, as the Republican presidential nominee's Twitter feed shows, he just chucked every single criticism he could think of at her, in no particular order. Behold, the result:

Bad "judgement" indeed. Becca Stanek

12:18 a.m. ET
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Hillary Clinton went deep into the archives, quoting another former first lady to try to prove her point that Donald Trump doesn't have the temperament to be Commander-in-Chief.

"I can't put it any better than Jackie Kennedy did after the Cuban Missile Crisis," Clinton said. "She said that what worried President Kennedy during that very dangerous time was that a war might be started — not by big men with self-control and restraint, but by little men — the ones moved by fear and pride." Clinton quoted Kennedy on what would have been her 87th birthday. Catherine Garcia

July 28, 2016
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

President Obama thought Hillary Clinton nailed it. Shortly after Clinton wrapped up her speech at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday night, Obama fired off this tweet lauding Clinton's leadership qualities and predicting the future of his current Twitter handle, @POTUS:

First Lady Michelle Obama followed up with some praise of her own, too:

The only question is, would former President Bill Clinton inherit @FLOTUS? Becca Stanek

July 28, 2016

Hillary Clinton wants gun owners to know that she has everyone's safety in mind when it comes to gun control.

"I'm not here to repeal the Second Amendment," she said during her speech at the Democratic National Convention. "I'm not here to take away your guns. I just don't want you to be shot by someone who shouldn't have a gun in the first place." If the nation is "serious about keeping our country safe," she added, " we also can't afford to have a president who's in the pocket of the gun lobby." Catherine Garcia

July 28, 2016
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During Thursday night's speeches at the Democratic National Convention, protesters aligned with Bernie Sanders repeatedly attempted to interrupt proceedings. But the Hillary Clinton faction got word of their plans, and came prepared. Check it out. Ryan Cooper

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