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April 1, 2014
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Although popular dating site OkCupid is in the business of matchmaking, it's currently embroiled in a public spat with Mozilla, the maker of popular web browser Firefox. Users who tried logging in using the browser yesterday met with difficulty because OKCupid is upset about a donation the Mozilla CEO made in 2008 to support a gay marriage ban in California.

"Mozilla's new CEO, Brendan Eich, is an opponent of equal rights for gay couples," OKCupid's message read. "We would therefore prefer that our users not use Mozilla software to access OkCupid." It continued: "[W]e wish them nothing but failure." Users can still access the site, but not before being shown links to download competing browsers.

In a statement to the Verge, Mozilla said it supports marriage equality and blasted the dating site's action: "OkCupid never reached out to us to let us know of their intentions, nor to confirm facts." Eich has been steeped in controversy since he was named CEO last week because of his $1,000 donation to campaigns supporting California's Proposition 8, a measure that barred gay marriage in the state, six years ago. A Mozilla board member even resigned because of his appointment. Jordan Valinsky

8:23 a.m. ET
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President Trump hit the 100-day mark of his presidency Saturday, a milestone he enthusiastically hailed in his weekly address the afternoon before.

"I truly believe that the first 100 days of my Administration has been just about the most successful in our country's history," Trump said in the brief video. "Our country is going up, and it's going up fast. Our companies are doing better. They just announced fantastic profits all because of what's happened in this rather short period of time, and that's just the beginning."

While other assessments of Trump's first 100 days have been rather more mixed, Trump is indisputably leading by one metric: He has signed more executive orders so far than any president since Harry Truman. Trump will spend his 100th day signing yet another order, this one ordering a study of the effects of current U.S. trade agreements, including the World Trade Organization. Bonnie Kristian

7:56 a.m. ET
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President Trump signed a one-week spending bill Friday night after both houses of Congress voted to approve the measure just hours before the midnight deadline to avert government shutdown.

"I'm disappointed that it doesn't go quicker," Trump said of working with Congress earlier Friday. "It is a very tough system." The stopgap measure had been put in jeopardy by a White House push to pass health-care reform before the administration's 100th day Saturday, but House leadership chose to delay a health-care vote until at least next week, paving the way for the bipartisan spending bill.

The federal government is now funded through May 5, by which point lawmakers expect to pass a $1 trillion spending bill financing Washington through the end of September. Bonnie Kristian

April 28, 2017
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Thousands are expected to gather Saturday in Washington, D.C., on President Trump's 100th day in office for the 2017 People's Climate March. Activists are hailing the event as an opportunity to fight for climate protections the Trump administration has threatened to roll back and to push the promise of clean energy. "The climate movement will convene in D.C. to show that the election didn't cancel physics," said climate activist and author Bill McKibben, who helped organize the first iteration of the People's Climate March, which took place in New York in 2014.

The march — which happens to fall on what could be a record-breakingly hot day in D.C. — will begin in front of the Capitol at 12:30 p.m ET. Protesters are expected to make their way to the White House by 2 p.m. ET.

This will be the second science-related march in two weeks in D.C., following last weekend's March for Science, which coincided with Earth Day. Becca Stanek

April 28, 2017

Late night television is marking the occasion of President Trump's first 100 days in office by condensing four months of news into just seconds.

For a walk down memory lane, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert packed everything into 100 seconds, beginning with "inauguration" and "largest audience" and ending with "tax plan" and "harder than he thought." Some repetitions stand out — the amount of times people say "Russia," for example, is a little concerning:

The Daily Show also did its own take on Trump's first 100 days in a supercut of White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer counting from zero to 100. It is, incredibly, a lot more entertaining than it sounds:

Not to be left out of the fun, The Simpsons also brutally encapsulated Trump's first 100 days in a short clip you can watch here. Jeva Lange

April 28, 2017
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A group of Columbia University students draped a Ku Klux Klan hood over a statue of Thomas Jefferson and labeled the Founding Father "the epitome of white supremacy." Protesters from the group Mobilized African Diaspora said the statue of the slave-holding Founding Father "validates rape, sexual violence, and racism" and shows Columbia's "hypocrisy" in recruiting black students as "mere tokens of the university." The Week Staff

April 28, 2017
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Former President Barack Obama pointed out that the Affordable Care Act is "more popular than the current president" during a private, off-the-record event Thursday in New York City, a person in attendance told CNN.

In a recent poll, CNN/ORC found Trump has an approval rating of 44 percent, while 47 percent of voters favor ObamaCare. Only 36 percent of people said they approve of how Trump is approaching health care. Obama added that he believes Trump and the Republicans face an uphill battle changing his law, which provides health care to millions.

A new version of the GOP's replacement bill is expected to be voted on in the coming weeks. Jeva Lange

April 28, 2017

President Trump was already talking about the 2020 presidential election in his speech Friday at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting. Trump, who on Friday became the first sitting president since the 1980s to address the NRA, fired off an early warning that his potential competitors in 2020 — namely, possible Democratic contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) — will be nowhere near as sympathetic as he is to gun owners' Second Amendment rights. "It may be Pocahontas, remember that," Trump said, using the nickname he came up with for Warren because of her previous claims that she's part Native American. "And she is not big for the NRA, that I can tell you."

Though Trump is starting to look ahead, he certainly hasn't forgotten about that big night months ago when he won the presidency. "Sports fans said that was the single most exciting even they've ever seen," Trump said, referring to his election night upset. "That includes Super Bowls, and World Series, and boxing matches. That was an exciting evening for all of us."

Trump promised the NRA that because it "came through" for him in the election, he is "going to come through" for it. "The eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end," Trump said. Becca Stanek

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