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March 31, 2014

Do you love baseball, but don't want to burn all your cash catching a game live? Then avoid the Red Sox, and go see the Diamondbacks instead. That's because the cost to attend a game and buy goodies at Fenway Park is absurdly high relative to the rest of the league, according to data compiled by Team Marketing Report.

In the group's annual rundown of average game expenses across the league, the reigning World Series champions captured the ignominious honor of having the most expensive fan experience, edging past the Yankees and dwarfing most everyone else. The following chart uses the group's "Fan Cost Index," which includes the sum of four average-price tickets, four small sodas, four hot dogs, two small beers, two adjustable hats, two game programs, and parking for one car.

Boston's Fan Cost Index is a little more than 60 percent above the MLB average, and nearly three times higher than Arizona's. And as you'd expect, the top of the list is heavy with big-market teams, while the bottom features some perennial penny-pinchers.

Unsurprisingly, the Red Sox also had the most expensive average ticket price at $52.32. Part of that has to do with the team's success over the past decade and change, but it's also the result of a high-demand market and a tiny stadium; Fenway is the fourth-smallest park in the pros.

Meanwhile, average tickets for a Padres game go for a league-low $16.37. Yet for overall value, no team beats the Diamondbacks. They're one of only two teams to sell hot dogs for under three bucks, and their $4 beers are an absolute steal. Jon Terbush

10:06 a.m. ET
STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images

At least 200 people were killed Friday and more than 100 others injured when Islamist militants attacked a Sufi mosque in Egypt's Sinai province, state run news agency MENA reports. "I can't believe they attacked a mosque," one cleric from the town told The New York Times, speaking anonymously out of fear that he could also be attacked.

The attackers planted bombs inside the mosque, then fired on worshipers as they tried to flee, The Associated Press reports. Extremists in the region have targeted Christian churches in the past, but attacks on mosques remain relatively rare. The worshipers at the mosque attacked Friday were Sufi Muslims, who are considered heretical by Sunni extremists. Jeva Lange

November 23, 2017
GoFundMe.com

While driving to Philadelphia in October, Kate McClure ran out of gas. The 27-year-old was stranded and alone on the side of I-95 when a homeless man approached her. The man, whose name was Johnny, told her to get back in the car and lock the doors while he went to get help.

Johnny returned with a can of gas he bought with his last $20, according to The Associated Press.

McClure got to her destination safely but couldn't stop thinking about her savior. So she launched a GoFundMe campaign with a $10,000 goal to get Johnny set up with an apartment, a reliable car, and a few months worth of expenses.

As of Thanksgiving, McClure's campaign has reached more than $200,000. "It just blew up," McClure told AP.

Johnny, 34, who has been without a home in the Philadelphia area for about a year, says he hopes to get a job at the nearby Amazon warehouse in Robinson, New Jersey. Lauren Hansen

November 23, 2017
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Two more women have accused Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) of groping their butts, HuffPost reported Wednesday.

The new allegations come days after radio host and model Leeann Tweeden said Franken kissed and groped her during a 2006 USO tour, and another woman, Lindsay Menz, said Franken squeezed her buttocks while they posed for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010.

The two new accusers spoke on the condition of anonymity, and said they did not know about each other's stories. Franken told HuffPost: "It's difficult to respond to anonymous accusers, and I don't remember those campaign events." Harold Maass

November 23, 2017
Screenshot / Twitter / The Washington Examiner

Speaking from his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida Thursday morning, President Trump offered words of gratitude and praise to the country's troops stationed abroad.

"For each of you I know it's hard to be away from home at this time of the year," Trump said via video, touting — on the plus side — the "great economy" the troops will eventually return home to. "When you come back you're going to see with the jobs and companies coming back into our country."

"Now we're working on tax cuts, big fat beautiful tax cuts," he continued. "And hopefully we'll get that and then you're really going to see things happen."

Before thanking the military families, Trump offered this last assurance: "We totally support you. In fact, we love you, we really do." Lauren Hansen

November 23, 2017
MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar and Bangladesh signed an agreement on Thursday to allow an unspecified number of Rohingya Muslims, who fled across the border to escape violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state, to return home.

More than 620,000 Rohingya have sought refuge in Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when an army crackdown started in response to attacks on a police post by Rohingya insurgents. Bangladesh said the first repatriations would start in two months.

The news came a day after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson referred to the violence against the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar as "ethnic cleansing." Harold Maass

November 23, 2017
MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images

Emmerson Mnangagwa, who served as Zimbabwe's vice president until ousted leader Robert Mugabe fired him on Nov. 6, will chair his first meeting as head of Zimbabwe's ruling Zanu-PF party Thursday and will be sworn in as the new president Friday, the speaker of the country's parliament announced Wednesday.

Mnangagwa's firing had triggered the chain of events that led to Mugabe's forced resignation Tuesday. Mnangagwa's ascension marks the country's first transfer of power since independence in 1980.

Mnangagwa returned to Zimbabwe Wednesday, after fleeing for safety, and addressed the public from the ruling party's headquarters. He said the military's intervention was the start of a "new democracy," one that required all Zimbabweans to work together to turn the country around. "We want to grow our economy, we want jobs, jobs, jobs," he said. Lauren Hansen

November 23, 2017
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In 2015, after a sexually explicit, mainly online relationship with a woman ended, Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) threatened to report the woman to the Capitol Police, according to a recording obtained by The Washington Post. Barton had reportedly sent the woman sexually explicit photos, videos, and messages over the course of their relationship, which began on Facebook in 2011.

The woman, who spoke to the Post on the condition of anonymity, recorded the 2015 conversation in which Barton confronted her about communications she had with other women connected to Barton. "I am ready if I have to, I don't want to, but I should take all this crap to the Capitol Hill Police and have them launch an investigation," he said, according to the recording.

On Wednesday, Barton apologized to his constituents after naked photos of him circulated on social media. In a statement, Barton, who is the longest-serving member of Congress from Texas, said he had sexual relationships "with other mature adult women" while separated from his second wife, before their divorce in 2015. "I am sorry I did not use better judgment during those days," he said. But Barton, who has reportedly hired a crisis communications firm, also said that he had suffered a potential crime over the released lewd photos. In Texas, it is a misdemeanor to intentionally publicize images or videos of someone's genitals or sexual activity without consent. Barton said the Capitol Police may be launching an investigation. Lauren Hansen

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