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2014 Watch
March 26, 2014

Alabama Republican congressional candidate Will Brooke wants voters to know where he stands on the big issues of the day: ObamaCare and guns. And what better way to convey his message than by blowing a copy of ObamaCare to smithereens with a bunch of guns?

So, a la Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) — who infamously shot up a cap and trade bill in a 2010 campaign ad — Brooke took a thick copy of ObamaCare out to the gun range for some target practice. One problem: Brooke couldn't quite blow the law to bits. But lucky for him, he, like all great hunters, had a wood chipper at the ready to finish the job. --Jon Terbush

This just in
6:27 p.m. ET
Darren McCollester/Getty Images

On Tuesday, Fox News announced the official line-up for its prime-time Republican debate Thursday.

Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Mike Huckabee, Dr. Ben Carson, Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wisconsin), Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida), Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), Gov. Chris Christie (R-New Jersey), and Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) all qualified, with Fox saying the roster was determined based on an average of the five most recent national polls.

The seven Republican candidates who did not make the list — Rick Santorum, Carly Fiorina, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina), Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-Louisiana), George Pataki, Jim Gilmore, and Rick Perry — will be invited to a separate debate at 5 p.m. ET., four hours before the main debate starts. Catherine Garcia

This just in
4:22 p.m. ET
JACQUES DEMARTHON/AFP/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio mandated citywide inspections of water-cooling towers after they were determined to be the cause of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in the South Bronx neighborhood of New York City. De Blasio additionally vowed to propose new regulations to prevent future outbreaks.

Since July 10, 86 people have fallen ill with Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia that is contracted by breathing in moist air infected with the bacteria; of 17 towers tested by city health officials, five in the South tested positive for Legionella bacteria. Seven people have died since the outbreak began. Jeva Lange

Pay up
3:40 p.m. ET
Yuri Gripas/Getty Images

Nearly a third of moviegoers surveyed by research firm C4 agree that they want customers' bags and purses checked for weapons before they enter a theater, Variety reports. The study asked the opinions of 250 moviegoers on July 28 and 29, less than a week after a shooter opened fire on an audience during a screening of Trainwreck in Lafayette, Louisiana, killing two and injuring nine. Thirty-four percent of those surveyed favored having armed security guards in theater lobbies while 14 percent called for armed security in every individual theater.

Despite the recent high-profile shootings in movie theaters — the 2012 massacre of 12 during a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colorado among them — Americans do still seem to believe that movie theaters are among the safest public spaces where they can spend their time, according to the study. Even despite wanting armed guards and metal detectors installed, customers didn't want to have to pay more than $3 per ticket for the additional security, and only 85 percent of 124 moviegoers surveyed said their theater habits had actually changed since the attack in Louisiana. Jeva Lange

A beer a day keeps the doctor away
2:59 p.m. ET
Scott Olson/Getty Images

A 110-year-old woman credits her longevity to the simple things: God and Miller High Life. New Jerseyan Agnes Fenton says she has been drinking a few Millers a day for the last 70 years, a habit she started after a doctor told her that her only health problem was a benign tumor.

Though Fenton no longer drinks as much as she did when she was a youthful 105 (her caregivers have told her that three Millers and a glass of whiskey a day is too much now that she eats less) Fenton says other than being faithful to God and a loyal imbiber of the champagne of beers, there isn't really a secret to her longevity.

"Just keep in touch with God and do the right thing," Fenton told ABC 7. "That's all I know." Cheers! Becca Stanek

This just in
2:36 p.m. ET
Darren McCollester/Getty Images

The first Republican presidential debate on Thursday, which is capped at 10 candidates, is now expected to include Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, Ben Carson, Mike Huckabee, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Rand Paul, Chris Christie, and John Kasich, The New York Times projects. Fox News, the host of the debate, will announce the official slate of 10 candidates after Tuesday's 5 p.m. polling deadline, but according to the network's criteria, it appears that Christie and Kasich will have firmly made the cut. Rick Perry, who had been neck-and-neck with them in earlier polls, fell to 11th place after he secured support from only 2.0 percent of those polled.

Rick Santorum, Bobby Jindal, Carly Fiorina, Lindsey Graham, and George Pataki likewise did not make the cut, and are expected to be designated to the earlier 5 p.m. debate on Thursday for those polling outside the top 10. Trump, meanwhile, leads the top 10 contenders with 23.2 percent support, and will appear on the debate stage in Cleveland on Thursday at 9 p.m. alongside his fellow presidential hopefuls. Jeva Lange

Trump mania explained
1:56 p.m. ET
Matthew Busch/Getty Images

Fox News Radio host Todd Starnes finally answered the question that political pollsters have been struggling to answer: Why is Donald Trump so popular across so many demographic groups? His theory is that while "everybody is trying to be the kinder, gentler, you know, the compassionate conservative," that's not what the "average American" actually wants.

He broke it down further, using a dog analogy. "The average American," Starnes explained, "they don't want one of those metrosexual purse dogs, they want a pit bull in the White House." Donald Trump, presumably, is the pit bull. A candidate such as Jeb Bush, in Starnes' opinion, is the "metrosexual purse dog."

In polls that came out this week, Trump led the GOP presidential field by a 2-to-1 advantage, garnering support from 26 percent of respondents in both the latest Monmouth University poll and the latest Fox poll. While political pundits were at first leery of Trump's staying power, Starnes said he knew all along that Trump's support would only continue to grow.

"I might not be the brightest bulb in the lava lamp," Starnes said, "but I came out with a commentary that aired all across the country that said 'do not underestimate Donald Trump.' This is the guy who is saying what the American working man and the American working woman want to hear." Becca Stanek

rip cecil
1:39 p.m. ET
Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

People will try to make a dime off of anything, including, apparently, Cecil the lion. Killed last month in Zimbabwe by a dentist, Cecil has been all over headlines recently (Was Jericho the Lion also murdered? What about this other lion?), and his likeness could soon end up stores, too. Motherboard reports that there have already been four trademark applications filed to the United States Patent and Trademark office, all of which are vying to claim Cecil for themselves.

The four applications were all filed for "paraphernalia," meaning the companies are looking to claim the rights to Cecil in order to make T-shirts, stuffed animals, and home decor. A travel agency, the maker of Beanie Babies, and the toy company responsible for plush toys of One Direction band members all filed for trademarks.

If these companies are really going to cash in on the Cecil craze, though, they may have already missed their window of opportunity: Motherboard points out that the Cecil the lion hype is unlikely to last the duration of the lengthy legal process required to acquire a trademark. Jeva Lange

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