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March 22, 2014

Modeling himself after Ronald Reagan, Rick Santorum says he hopes his new role as CEO of EchoLight Studios will help him become “a little better storyteller.”

The Redemption of Henry Myers is the second movie released by the company with Santorum in charge (the first was a holiday option called The Christmas Candle.) It airs on Sunday on the Hallmark Movie Channel, but curious viewers can check out a preview, below:

Selling movies is as tough as gaining voters, Santorum says, but, “if you have a good product, that helps a lot. We felt like we have a good product with our films and obviously I felt we have a pretty good product with me.”

Obviously. Sarah Eberspacher

February 9, 2016
Alex Wong/Getty Images

CNN and The New York Times are projecting Bernie Sanders as the winner of the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. With 80 percent of 300 precincts reporting, Sanders is leading Hillary Clinton 59.9 percent to 38.5 percent, with 119,794 votes to Clinton's 76,965. Catherine Garcia

February 9, 2016

With the polls showing him in fifth place in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said he wasn't happy, but "our disappointment tonight is not on you, it's on me."

A dejected Rubio cut a much different figure than the jubilant Rubio who came in third in Iowa one week ago. He pinned the loss on his performance at the Republican debate on Saturday, but told supporters: "Listen to this: That will never happen again. That will never happen again. Let me tell you why: It's not about me, it's not about this campaign, it's about this election. It is about what is at stake in this election." Rubio said he will end up winning the election, and he "must" because otherwise, "we may lose our country." Catherine Garcia

February 9, 2016
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Both CNN and The New York Times have called Donald Trump the winner of the New Hampshire primary, where he holds 34 percent of the vote with 76 percent of precincts reporting. Giving his first victory speech of the election, Trump vowed "to make America so great again. Maybe greater than ever before."

A number of news organizations have called John Kasich the second place winner with 16 percent. Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush, and Marco Rubio are locked in a battle for third place, virtually tied between 11 and 10 percent. Jeva Lange

February 9, 2016

John Kasich's second-place finish in New Hampshire prompted a feel-good speech full of tears and hugs and Chicken Soup for the Soul-esque advice about slowing down and living in the moment. It also had a fabulous super villain cackle:

Many people watching were put off by the laugh. "Whoa, Kasich sounded a little unhinged with that evil laugh," tweeted Fusion's Collier Meyerson. American Interest's Peter Blair agreed: "That Kasich laugh was the best thing so far shown on CNN tonight." Jeva Lange

February 9, 2016
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is crushing Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton among voters under 30, at least in the first two voting states. There are probably a lot of reasons younger voters back Sanders, including his aura of authenticity and outsider status, his promise of a Washington-shaking revolution, and his stands on campaign finance, tuition-free college, and taxing Wall Street. But, PBS Newshour's Daniel Bush says, millennials aren't "connecting with Hillary" for a more "obvious" reason, "and we're missing it." That reason? Clinton is yesterday's candidate.

The idea that Clinton, 68, is too old-school may seem odd considering that her main challenger — the one beloved by young voters — is a 74-year-old self-described democratic socialist. But many millennials were babies during Bill Clinton's presidency, in middle school during Hillary Clinton's 2008 run, and in high school when she was secretary of state. "Hillary is like our parents' Bernie," college freshman Madison Egan told Newshour over the din of indie rock group Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes, playing on stage at a Sanders rally in Manchester, New Hampshire.

"People who are 18 or 20 didn't live through the Clinton era. To them, Hillary is just another public figure," Democratic strategist Hank Sheinkopf, a veteran of Bill Clinton's 1996 campaign, tells Newshour. "There is a generational shift going on." Peter Weber

February 9, 2016

Ted Cruz, vying for a third-place finish in the New Hampshire primary after his first-place showing in the Iowa caucuses, congratulated Donald Trump and second-place finisher John Kasich on Tuesday night. But he quickly declared that his strong showing (11.6 percent, with 63 percent of precincts counting) meant the real winner was "the conservative grassroots" and the real loser "the Washington cartel." To win in November, he said, the Republicans need conservatives, traditional Republicans, and "especially the Reagan Democrats." To earn the votes of blue-collar Democrats, he said, "we must stand univocally against amnesty" and ObamaCare, "and for Pete's sake, we don't need more deals," a probable shot at New Hampshire winner Donald Trump.

Cruz said he would continue to campaign against abortion and for gun rights, and said that when he wins the White House, it will be "a victory for We the People" and the death knell for "bipartisan corruption of Washington." Peter Weber

February 9, 2016
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Jeb Bush is in a fight for third place in the New Hampshire Republican primary, but told supporters he's optimistic as he makes his way to South Carolina.

"This campaign's not dead," he told about 250 people at Manchester Community College. He thanked his volunteers, many of whom came from Florida, and said the pundits "had it all figured out last Monday night when the Iowa caucuses were complete. They said the race was now a three-person race between two freshmen senators and a reality TV star. And while the reality TV star's still doing well, it looks like you all have reset the race."

In case people forgot what was at stake, Bush announced: "We're electing the president of the United States. A person that has to make tough decisions. And I got to share my heart and share my ideas about the future of this country and I'm so grateful to have that opportunity here in New Hampshire." Bush has three events scheduled in South Carolina on Wednesday, and some time in the near future is expected to be joined by his brother, former President George W. Bush, The Washington Post reports. Catherine Garcia

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