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March 21, 2014
Facebook/Veronica Mars Movie

It's been just one week since the long-awaited Veronica Mars movie hit theaters, but fans who enjoyed their brief return to Neptune, California, have already moved on to the next logical question: When do we get a sequel?

In an email sent to Veronica Mars' Kickstarter backers, series creator Rob Thomas hinted at the possibility of a future installment:

Next time, maybe we'll make a movie that's 100 percent accessible to audiences who have never seen Veronica Mars. Speaking of which:

I know that a lot of you have been writing, and posting to ask about a sequel: if it will happen, what number we need to hit, whether we'd fund it through another Kickstarter, and so on.

Here's the answer to all of those questions: It's too soon to know.

I know that everyone involved would love to keep on going. I hope that we will. But there's no news on that yet, and it might be a while before we know. I'm so happy to get the seven-year "Will there be a Veronica Mars movie?" monkey off my back, that I could use a little time to savor this moment before launching the "Will there be another Veronica Mars movie?" crusade. Know this: I'd love for it to happen, and early signs are encouraging.

Whatever happens with the Veronica Mars franchise on screen, fans do have a few more Mars Investigations to anticipate: The Veronica Mars book series, co-authored by Thomas and Jennifer Graham, which kicks off with The Thousand-Dollar Tan Line next week. Scott Meslow

3:41 p.m. ET
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The CEO of a New York-based technology investment company has offered to put forward $10 million to charity if Donald Trump will debate Bernie Sanders.

Trump has flip-flopped on his promise to debate Sanders, although he eventually said during a Thursday speech that he would do so only if someone paid $10 million to a "women's health charity." Sanders has also appeared to be up for a debate, asking for the matchup to take place in the largest stadium possible.

Traction and Scale CEO Richie Heckler told BuzzFeed News that his company would be willing to put forward the money if they were given the opportunity to host the debate. Heckler, who supported a Michael Bloomberg candidacy, aims to hold the event on June 6, the day before the California primary, and in the largest venue in California that can be secured. Heckler said "the format we're going to use will be different," and that the debate would be "a very powerful change to the process."

It would certainly be unusual, anyway — neither Trump nor Sanders have been officially nominated by their respective parties. In fact, Sanders looks more than likely to lose in July to Hillary Clinton, who has so far turned down his requests for another Democratic debate. Jeva Lange

3:17 p.m. ET

Though Dr. Henry Heimlich developed his life-saving maneuver way back in 1974, it wasn't until this week that he actually put it to the test in an emergency. On Monday evening at his retirement home in Cincinnati, the 96-year-old retired chest surgeon saved someone who was choking with his namesake treatment for what he says is the first time ever.

During dinner, Heimlich noticed fellow resident Patty Ris, 87, suddenly begin to choke on a piece of hamburger. While staff rushed over to help her, it was Heimlich who ultimately stepped in to help. "I did the Heimlich Maneuver — of course,” Heimlich told The Guardian. “She was going to die if she wasn't treated. I did it, and a piece of food with some bone in it flew out of her mouth."

Ris joined the ranks of the tens of thousands of lives, including former President Ronald Reagan, that have been saved in the U.S. thanks to Dr. Heimlich's maneuver. "When I used it, and she recovered quickly," Heimlich said, "it made me appreciate how wonderful it has been to be able to save all those lives." Becca Stanek

2:37 p.m. ET
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Customers in a Didsbury, England, coffee shop began to "freak out" after they heard shouting and "gunshot-like bangs," prompting one man to dive head-first out a window to escape, Metro reports. The Costa Coffee patrons believed they were experiencing a terrorist attack — although the sounds turned out to be noisy school children banging their trays downstairs.

"It sounded like shots were being fired. It was not just me who thought that," one woman who asked not to be named by The Manchester Evening News said. "Other people were running around trying to get out on to the balcony but the door was locked. I think that's why the man went for one of the front windows. When I looked round I could only see his feet hanging from the window. He was climbing out head first. To be honest I wasn't surprised by his reaction because we all thought an attack was happening. It sounded like there was a shooting downstairs. I was expecting people wearing balaclavas and carrying guns to come upstairs."

The man who jumped out the window may have broken his arm, and was taken to the hospital. Costa Coffee wishes him a speedy recovery. Jeva Lange

2:13 p.m. ET
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"There are a number of things in life that can calm down just about anybody; burning wood fires, and hanging out in hot tubs are chief among them," says J.D. Digiovanni at HiConsumption.com.

The Soak outdoor wood-fired hot tub ($4,450), created by a Canadian design and fabrication firm, combines both pleasures. Made from marine-grade aluminum, stainless steel, and red cedar, this tub for two heats up via a wood fire or propane. The tub's Bauhaus-inspired modernist lines aren't what you expect from a wood-fired tub, but the look is "a great fit for almost any backyard." The Week Staff

2:00 p.m. ET
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Verizon reached a deal Friday with two labor unions representing 39,000 employees, Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez has announced. The four-year agreement is now being put into writing, and the employees are expected to go back to work next week.

The deal puts an end to six weeks of strikes over pay and pension cuts. Between 35,000 and 39,000 Verizon employees walked off their jobs in April, making it the largest strike in U.S. history.

"This tentative resolution is a testament to the power of collective bargaining. I commend the leadership of Verizon, CWA, and IBEW for their commitment to resolving these difficult issues in the spirit of constructive engagement. I expect that workers will be back on the job next week,” Perez said in a statement. Jeva Lange

12:41 p.m. ET
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As the remaining Republican hold-outs against Donald Trump hunker down for the long haul, Mitt Romney is finding himself in lonelier and lonelier company. Having repeatedly spoken out against Trump to seemingly no avail, Romney confessed to The Wall Street Journal, "I know that some people are offended that someone who lost and is the former nominee continues to speak, but that's how I can sleep at night. And there are some people, though it's a small number, who still value my opinion."

Romney said that he realizes his comments against Trump could ultimately help Hillary Clinton, and he is still looking for a candidate who he can support in November. He will write one in if need be. "Others, including myself, believe our first priority should be to stand by our principles and if those are in conflict with the nominee, the principles come first," Romney said.

Trump has repeatedly countered Romney's attacks, calling him a "choker" and claiming "I've got a store worth more than he is." But when Romney's son Josh asked in March, "When the grandkids ask, 'What did you do to stop Donald Trump?' what are you going to say?" Romney realized there was only one way he was going to get through this election with a good conscience.

"I wanted my grandkids to see that I simply couldn't ignore what Mr. Trump was saying and doing, which revealed a character and temperament unfit for the leader of the free world," Romney said. Jeva Lange

11:55 a.m. ET
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Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) is voting for you know who in the presidential election. Though Rubio didn't come right out and say that he'd be voting for his former rival Donald Trump, it was heavily implied in his tweets Friday where he said that come November, not only will he not be voting for Hillary Clinton, but he also won't be abstaining from voting. That leaves just one other option:

Rubio followed up that tweet with emphasis on the fact that his change of heart has more to do with preventing Hillary Clinton from becoming president than suddenly loving Trump:

Just months ago, Rubio was chastising Trump for his supposedly little hands, calling him everything from an "embarrassment" to a "person that has no ideas of any substance on the important issues." So far, his supporters haven't been thrilled with his changed tone on Trump:

The true test for Rubio's new alliance will be whether he sticks with his original plan to sit out on the Senate race because a "real good friend" of his from Florida is now running, or whether he heeds Trump's advice and runs. Becca Stanek

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