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March 20, 2014
Youtube / Left Hand Brewery

Colorado's Left Hand Brewery makes some unique — and tasty — craft beers. And in 2011, the brewery became the first in the nation to bottle a beer using nitrogen gas in place of carbon dioxide. Nitrogen gives beer a creamier texture, making it perfect for the brand's highly-regarded milk stout. Hence, the Milk Stout Nitro was born.

But with the craft beer market booming, Left Hand wants to protect its creation. So, as the Denver Post points out, the brewery is trying to trademark the word "nitro" as it applies to beer, as well as "milk stout nitro."

That a brewery would feel it necessary to protect a word that is really just shorthand for "nitrogen" might seem funny; imagine if, say, Budweiser tried to trademark "refreshing." But plenty of breweries pour nitrogen-infused beer on draft, and they may be leery of a single brewery having the rights to what's essentially a descriptor. So to assuage a mini-backlash from beer aficionados concerned that an esteemed craft brewer was trying to squelch would-be competitors, Left Hand clarified in a statement that it is only trying to "protect the name of our best selling products," and "not the style — not nitrogenated beers." Jon Terbush

Trump administration hits North Korea with new set of sanctions

12:49 p.m. ET
ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images

The United States announced a new set of sanctions on North Korea on Friday. The sanctions are specifically aimed at 27 entities, 28 vessels, and one lone individual accused of shipping goods illegally to North Korea and helping further leader Kim Jong Un's nuclear weapons program. In a statement, the Treasury Department called the actions "the largest North Korea-related sanctions tranche to date." President Trump's administration has enacted various sets of sanctions against North Korea in ongoing efforts to curb their nuclear ambitions.

Those punished in this new round of sanctions will be prohibited from doing business with people in the U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said: "This will significantly hinder the Kim regime's capacity to conduct evasive maritime activities that facilitate illicit coal and fuel transports, and erode its abilities to ship goods through international waters."

Trump was expected to detail the sanctions during his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday, but he only referenced them in passing, describing them as "the heaviest sanctions ever imposed on a country before." Kelly O'Meara Morales

11:57 a.m. ET

Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) announced Friday that the age to buy firearms in the Sunshine State will be raised to 21. The minimum age was previously 18.

Scott said active and reserve military members as well as law enforcement officers will be granted an exemption from the new rules. His remarks came during a press conference where he also proposed various other reforms to prevent mass shootings like the one that happened last week at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

ABC News reports that Scott also wants to put law enforcement officers in every Florida public school, ban the sale and purchase of modified bump stocks that allow semiautomatic rifles to fire faster, and implement a "Violent Threat Restraining Order," which would legally "prohibit a violent or mentally ill person from purchasing or possessing a firearm."

Scott declared: "Keeping guns away from dangerous people and people with mental issues is what we need to do." Kelly O'Meara Morales

11:34 a.m. ET
Screenshot/Twitter/ABC News

Speaking to an enthusiastic crowd Friday at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, President Trump bashed the "fake news" media, reiterated his support of the Second Amendment, and joked about his "bald spot" during a freewheeling, high-energy address. Calling his speech boring and admitting to going off script, the president was frequently interrupted by chants of "USA," "lock her up," and "build the wall."

In addition to discussing job growth and the border wall, Trump doubled down on his divisive proposal to arm schoolteachers. Addressing reports that the armed guard at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School didn't engage the shooter as the attack was unfolding, Trump claimed that an armed teacher "would have shot the hell out of [the gunman] before he knew it."

The president explained: "I'd rather have somebody that loves their students and wants to protect their students than somebody standing outside that … doesn't know the students." While he also called for stricter background checks on gun purchases, Trump warned the audience: "If [Democrats] get in, they'll take away your Second Amendment, which we will never allow that to happen."

Trump wrapped up his address with the recitation of an anti-immigration poem called "The Snake," a staple during his 2016 campaign rallies. "We are going to make America great again," he said just before he walked off the stage. "And I will never, ever, ever let you down." Jeva Lange

11:13 a.m. ET
AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. will reportedly move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem much sooner than previously anticipated.

Last month, Vice President Mike Pence told Israeli lawmakers that the move would occur by the end of 2019, but Israel's Channel 10 News reports that the date has been moved up to May 14, which marks the 70th anniversary of Israel's declaration of independence. The White House has yet to confirm the development, though Axios cited an anonymous U.S. official in its report.

Citing unnamed Israeli officials, Axios explains that the relocated embassy will first operate as an "interim embassy" at the U.S.'s consular annex in Jerusalem until the State Department decides on a new permanent location. Earlier Friday, The Associated Press reported that the State Department was considering paying for "some or all of the [new] embassy costs" via donations from Republican donors, including pro-Israel billionaire donor Sheldon Adelson.

The U.S. announced in December that it would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move its embassy to the contested city. Israeli lawmakers applauded the decision, but the announcement sparked immediate pushback from Arab states as Palestinians also lay claim to Jerusalem and say it should be their capital in a future state. Kelly O'Meara Morales

9:57 a.m. ET

"Who loves mass shootings?"

CNN's Alisyn Camerota posed the improbable question to NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch on Friday, one day after Loesch declared at the Conservative Political Action Conference that "[many] in legacy media love mass shootings." Loesch additionally accused the media of milking "crying white mothers" for TV ratings, just one week after 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida.

After reading Loesch's quote back to her, Camerota asked: "Why would you make a statement like that?" The NRA spokeswoman replied: "Because it's true." Loesch claimed that she was not referring to everyone in the media — "I said 'many,' not 'all'" — and pointed to "wall-to-wall coverage" of the shootings, claiming that TV networks give more air time to the perpetrators of mass shootings than to the survivors.

"It's just malicious, actually, that you would say that," Camerota retorted. "I don't know anybody in the media who likes mass shootings. You're wrong on every single level. We pray that there's never another one." Loesch tried to get a word in, but Camerota continued: "Guess what? [Mass shootings] are not ratings gold because Americans have reached saturation level," she said. "It's so heartbreaking that they actually often turn away, and we still have the conversation trying to find solutions."

"You're saying that it's malicious, but yet on your network, you've allowed [gun owners] to be indicted as child-murderers," Loesch replied. Watch the tense exchange below. Kelly O'Meara Morales

9:41 a.m. ET

The second day of the 2018 Conservative Political Action Conference has begun, with President Trump set to speak at 10:05 a.m. ET. The gathering in National Harbor, Maryland, is one of the biggest events of the year for conservative activists, with attendance known to top 10,000 people.

Following Trump's speech is a panel on "the new Trump Doctrine" at 11:15 a.m.; a conversation between White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and the administrator of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon, at 11:55 a.m.; a speech by Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai at 12:30 p.m.; and a talk by British pro-Trump politician Nigel Farage at 3:35 p.m.

See the full schedule here and watch CPAC live below. Jeva Lange

9:26 a.m. ET
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Because tipplers and java fiends need good news, too, a new study from the University of California, Irvine, has found that drinking alcohol and coffee increases your chance of living past 90 by a statistically significant amount. The university's 90+ Study has followed about 1,700 nonagenarians since 2003, and those "who drank moderate amounts of alcohol or coffee lived longer than those who abstained." "Moderate" means two glasses of beer or wine and two cups of coffee, which decrease your chances of premature death by 18 percent (alcohol) and 10 percent (coffee).

"I have no explanation for it, but I do firmly believe that modest drinking improves longevity," study lead researcher Dr. Claudia Kawas said at an American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Austin last weekend. But there's good news for more than just beverage aficionados in the study. "People who were overweight in their 70s lived longer than normal or underweight people did," the study found, even if the difference was just 3 percent. People with a hobby were 21 percent less likely to die early, and — sorry — exercising 15-45 minutes a day also reduced premature death chances by 11 percent.

So, pick your poison — in this case, a moderate amount may extend your life. Peter Weber

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