Cheers
March 20, 2014
Youtube / Left Hand Brewery

Colorado's Left Hand Brewery makes some unique — and tasty — craft beers. And in 2011, the brewery became the first in the nation to bottle a beer using nitrogen gas in place of carbon dioxide. Nitrogen gives beer a creamier texture, making it perfect for the brand's highly-regarded milk stout. Hence, the Milk Stout Nitro was born.

But with the craft beer market booming, Left Hand wants to protect its creation. So, as the Denver Post points out, the brewery is trying to trademark the word "nitro" as it applies to beer, as well as "milk stout nitro."

That a brewery would feel it necessary to protect a word that is really just shorthand for "nitrogen" might seem funny; imagine if, say, Budweiser tried to trademark "refreshing." But plenty of breweries pour nitrogen-infused beer on draft, and they may be leery of a single brewery having the rights to what's essentially a descriptor. So to assuage a mini-backlash from beer aficionados concerned that an esteemed craft brewer was trying to squelch would-be competitors, Left Hand clarified in a statement that it is only trying to "protect the name of our best selling products," and "not the style — not nitrogenated beers." Jon Terbush

Quotables
11:06 a.m. ET
Newsmakers/Getty Images

Thirty years after three British scientists discovered a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, one of them says humans are still "inflicting major changes on the atmosphere."

"Then, it was chlorofluorocarbons; today it is greenhouse gases," Jon Shanklin of the British Antarctic Survey told The Guardian. "The ozone hole story tells us that it is very easy to cause major changes to the atmosphere — it only took about 10 years to develop — but it is very difficult to restore equilibrium. Unfortunately, we don't seem to have learned that lesson."

In 1985, Shanklin, along with colleagues Brian Gardiner and the late Joe Farman, discovered manmade chemicals were depleting the ozone in the upper atmosphere, allowing cancer-causing radiation to reach the earth. Their work led to the Montreal Protocol, an international treaty that banned CFCs and has been called "the single most successful international agreement to date."

But Shanklin now notes that "the CFCs we put up there will take a long time to dissipate," and that the ozone layer is far from fully recovered.

Read the rest of the interview over at The Guardian. Sarah Eberspacher

Flip-flop
9:40 a.m. ET
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Speaking on Russia's state-run Rossiya channel on Saturday, President Vladimir Putin admitted that Moscow and Washington have "disagreements," but that "there is something that unites us, that forces us to work together," Reuters reports.

"I mean general efforts directed at making the world economy more democratic, measured and balanced, so that the world order is more democratic," Putin said. "We have a common agenda."

His comments come two days after he told a Russian phone-in show that the United States wants "not allies, but vassals," and is behaving like the former Soviet Union in its overreaching foreign policy. Sarah Eberspacher

Foreign affairs
9:16 a.m. ET
AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File

A new report from the United Nations on Friday says at least 120,000 people have been displaced due to ongoing violence in Yemen (an Oxfam report put the minimum number closer to 121,000).

"This is in addition to the 300,000-plus Yemenis already displaced by previous violence," Adrian Edwards, a spokesperson for the UNHCR, said in a statement reported by NPR. "It's feared this figure could rise significantly if violence continues."

The number of displaced persons has escalated since Saudi-led airstrikes began against the Houthi rebels more than three weeks ago. Iran submitted a four-point peace plan to the U.N. on Friday, but Reuters reports that other international diplomats have dismissed the country's claims of brokering peace, saying Iran, which has backed the Houthi rebels in the conflict, is not a neutral party. Sarah Eberspacher

Watch this
8:41 a.m. ET

You can plan the perfect IMAX event to drum up interest for your teaser trailer, but sometimes (all of the time), the internet is going to ignore your carefully laid out plans.

Such was the case for Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice director Zack Snyder, who countered an online leak of the upcoming film's trailer by releasing the real deal on Friday night. As his tweet accurately claims, Warner Bros.' version is neither blurry nor pirated. Watch Ben Affleck's Batman and Henry Cavill's Superman square off, sans IMAX, in the video, below. —Sarah Eberspacher

ISIS
8:27 a.m. ET

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said that the Islamic State claimed its militants were behind a series of attacks on the city of Jalalabad that killed at least 33 people and injured more than 100 on Saturday.

"Today the deadly attack in Nangarhar Province, who claimed responsibility?” asked Ghani while speaking on national television. "Taliban did not claim responsibility, but Daesh claimed responsibility." The New York Times notes that Daesh is the Arabic pronunciation of ISIS.

Several explosions occurred near the New Kabul Bank branch, as government workers lined up to collect their paychecks. The deadliest attack involved a suicide bomber wearing a vest packed with explosives. Officials said all of the victims were civilians.

Al Jazeera English reports that if confirmed as an ISIS operation, Saturday's attacks would be the first major ones carried out by the group in Afghanistan. Sarah Eberspacher

This just in
April 17, 2015
Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the most prolific scorer in NBA history, underwent successful quadruple-bypass surgery in Los Angeles, according to a statement released Friday by UCLA Health. Abdul-Jabbar had the procedure done Thursday at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center after being admitted there with cardiovascular disease earlier this week.

Abdul-Jabbar is the NBA's all-time leading scorer and is most known for his 14 seasons with the Los Angeles Lakers during the "Showtime" era. In his 20 years in the NBA, Abdul-Jabbar won six championships and was named league MVP six times. He is expected to make a full recovery. Kimberly Alters

Only in America
April 17, 2015
iStock

A San Diego man trying to board a bus in his wheelchair was stripped of his transit pass because he didn't have proper "proof" of his disability. A transit cop told Joey Canales, 31, that he wasn't carrying the proper paperwork and confiscated the pass. "My disability is not hidden," Canales told the officer, who also issued him a ticket. The Week Staff

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