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March 2, 2014
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Blue Jasmine star Cate Blanchett just won the Best Actress Oscar for her starring role in Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine. "As random and subjective as this award is, it means a great deal in a year of exceptional performances by women," Blanchett said, before praising her fellow nominees Amy Adams, Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, and Judi Dench.

Blanchett went on to thank director Woody Allen — who remains embroiled in a controversy over molestation allegations — to the uneasy applause of the audience. Scott Meslow

11:38 p.m. ET
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When President Trump finally settled on a strategy for the war in Afghanistan this weekend at Camp David, he went with the plan pushed by generals who understand the complexities of the situation and have battlefield experience, not what the non-interventionist faction in the White House wanted, several administration officials and Trump allies told The Washington Post.

Trump has spent months angry over the fact there's no quick fix for Afghanistan, the Post reports. He discussed yanking every U.S. troop out of the country, firing the commander, and even sending the controversial founder of Blackwater to Afghanistan in order to privatize the effort, but finally, he settled on sending more troops after listening to Defense Secretary James Mattis, National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, and new chief of staff John Kelly, whose son was killed in 2010 while fighting in Afghanistan.

The Post reports that one way McMaster convinced Trump to take an interest in Afghanistan was by showing him a photo from 1972, before the rise of the Taliban — in it, women are shown walking down the street wearing miniskirts. For years, Trump was very vocal about how pointless he thought the war in Afghanistan was, calling it a "total disaster" that is "wasting our money" in 2012, and saying in 2013, "We should leave Afghanistan immediately." He echoed these sentiments during the campaign, but now, the Post says, he just wants to be looked at as being "strong and decisive" when it comes to fighting the war. Read more about the strategy, and how former chief strategist Stephen Bannon faced off against McMaster, at The Washington Post. Catherine Garcia

11:37 p.m. ET

Given Fox News host Tucker Carlson's previous treatment of President Trump, the wags on Twitter had some fun predicting what he would say Monday night about Trump's decision to stare directly into the sun during the solar eclipse, without using the solar glasses in his hand, ignoring all the warnings about irreversible eye damage. "It is good the president is blind now," reads one fake Carlson talking point imagined by comedy writer Jason O. Gilbert. "Trump's other senses about about to get MUCH stronger."

Haha. So here's what Carlson said on actual real life Fox News.

Maybe Carlson was getting in on the joke by declaring, with a straight face, that Trump's staring at the sun without protective glasses was "perhaps the most impressive thing any president has ever done." Maybe he was serious. Who can say? But seriously, looking at the sun without protection during a solar eclipse is a bad idea that can lead to permanent retina damage and partial blindness. Whether or not you think of the American president as a role model, Trump was clearly setting a bad example by risking his vision for a momentary thrill on national TV. The New York Daily News gets it.

Yeah. Peter Weber

10:14 p.m. ET
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While discussing his strategy for the war in Afghanistan, President Trump on Monday had sharp words for Pakistan, saying the United States could "no longer be silent about Pakistan's safe havens for terrorist organizations, the Taliban, and other groups that pose a threat to the region and beyond."

The country has "much to gain" by working with the U.S. in Afghanistan, and "much to lose by continuing to harbor criminals and terrorists." The United States has been paying Pakistan "hundreds of millions" at the same time they are housing "the very terrorists we are fighting," and that "has to change immediately," Trump added. Because both Pakistan and India have nuclear arms, their "tense relations threaten to spiral into conflict," Trump said, and it is in everyone's best interests to come together to fight "agents of chaos, violence, and terror." Catherine Garcia

9:48 p.m. ET
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In a televised address, President Trump on Monday shared his strategy for Afghanistan and South Asia, saying the United States military is "not nation-building again. We are killing terrorists."

Speaking in front of an audience of soldiers at Ft. Myer, Virginia, Trump said the American people are "weary of war without victory," and he "shares their frustration." When it comes to Afghanistan, while his original instinct was to pull all troops out, he listened to his advisers and came up with a new strategy, Trump said, but will never reveal the number of troops on the ground in the country or announce upcoming military actions. Trump is also expanding authority for American armed forces to "target terrorists and criminal networks that sow violence and chaos throughout Afghanistan," he said.

Trump will not set a timetable on when to withdraw troops, instead using a conditions based approach, and economic development in Afghanistan will help defray the United States' cost. The U.S. must "seek an honorable and enduring outcome worthy of the tremendous sacrifices that have been made, especially the sacrifice of lives," Trump said, and the "consequences of a rapid exit are both predictable and unacceptable." Catherine Garcia

9:02 p.m. ET
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President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell won't be bonding over a shared belief in fake news.

Trump often talks about his dislike of most media, Fox News being the main exception, tweeting on Monday morning that the "very dishonest Fake News Media is out of control!" and telling the "Fake News" it should listen to Liberty University's Jerry Falwell, who was "fantastic on Fox and Friends."

McConnell has a different outlook. Later Monday, he revealed during a Q&A with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin at the Louisville Chamber of Commerce that his "view is that most news is not fake, but I do try to look at a variety of sources." McConnell was asked which publications he reads, and shared that he reads articles from different outlets for balance. "I try not to fall in love with any particular source," he said. Catherine Garcia

8:14 p.m. ET
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A 63-year-old woman with terminal ovarian cancer was awarded $417 million Monday after a jury in Los Angeles found Johnson & Johnson liable for not warning her about the risk of using the company's talcum products.

Eva Echeverria's lawsuit is one of 4,500 in the United States, which allege that Johnson & Johnson disregarded studies that link its baby powder and Shower to Shower products with ovarian cancer. The jury awarded her $347 in punitive damages and $70 million in compensatory damages, and found there was a connection between her cancer and the powder. Echeverria was diagnosed in 2007, and said she started using Johnson & Johnson's baby powder at age 11, and didn't stop until 2016; Echeverria testified she would have quit much sooner had she known about the link.

Her lawsuit cited a 1982 study that showed woman who put talc on their genitals had a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer, with the head researcher telling Johnson & Johnson it should put warning labels on its products, the Los Angeles Times reports. Johnson & Johnson, which said it plans on appealing the verdict, cited a different study from 2000, where researchers stated there was "no overall association" between talc use and epithelial ovarian cancer, but there was a "modest elevation in risk" for the type of cancer Echeverria has — serious ovarian cancer. She was not in the courthouse when the jury made its ruling, her attorney said, because she was too ill to attend. Catherine Garcia

6:57 p.m. ET
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A new ABC News/Washington Post poll finds in the wake of the deadly Charlottesville white supremacist rally, 37 percent of Americans approve of President Trump's job performance while 58 percent disapprove.

When it comes to how he responded to the incident in Charlottesville, just 28 percent approve compared to 56 percent who do not. The poll also found that nine percent of respondents, the equivalent of 22 million Americans, believe it is acceptable to hold white supremacist or neo-Nazi views, and 10 percent support the alt-right movement, while 50 percent oppose it. The poll, a random sample of 1,014 adults, was conducted August 16-20 in English and Spanish, on landlines and cell phones. The margin of sampling error is 3.5 points. Catherine Garcia

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