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March 2, 2014

"We forgot one. Harold Ramis, for Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, and Groundhog Day."

While presenting the Best Cinematography Oscar alongside Amy Adams, Bill Murray offered an impromptu tribute to his colleague and friend Harold Ramis, who died last week of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis. --Scott Meslow

3:13 a.m. ET

One of the more bizarre and eye-catching parts of the newly released memos former FBI Director James Comey wrote after his conversations with President Trump is a comment Trump reportedly made at a Feb. 8, 2017, meeting in the Oval Office.

"The president brought up the 'Golden Showers thing' and said it really bothered him if wife had any doubt about it," Comey recalled. "He then explained, as he did at our dinner, that he hadn't stayed overnight in Russia during the Miss Universe trip. ... The president said 'the hookers thing' is nonsense but that Putin had told him 'we have some of the most beautiful hookers in the world.' He did not say when Putin had told him this."

That is a strange thing to say to an FBI director on your third-ever meeting — in their first, Comey had briefed Trump on the Russia dossier compiled by British ex-spy Christopher Steele, which included the unsubstantiated "golden showers thing" — but it is also odd because officially, Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin had spoken only once, on a Jan. 28 phone call. Trump claimed to have met Putin several times between 2013 and 2016 — as CNN meticulously documents — including during a 2015 debate, though his story changed in 2016.

On Jan. 17, 2017, however, Putin said on TV: "I don't know Mr. Trump. ... I have never met him and I don't know what he will do on the international arena." And in that same speech, he made light of the Trump-prostitute allegation, saying Trump had met the most beautiful women in the world and so had no need for Moscow prostitutes, adding that "they are also the best in the world."

So, maybe Putin told the same thing to Trump on the phone right after his inauguration, in their first conversation, or perhaps Trump saw the comment on TV and thought it was directed at him. The possibilities are not quite endless, but they are curious. Peter Weber

2:01 a.m. ET

There was no hesitation — when Charlie Ball heard that his old high school classmate Kenneth Walker needed a kidney, he volunteered to donate if a match.

Ball and Walker both graduated from Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington, D.C., in 1969, and while they weren't friends, Ball recognized Walker's name when he saw an email from him in his inbox. Walker, a journalist, learned when he returned to the United States from South Africa 18 months ago that he needed a kidney transplant, and tried everything to find a match. A high school friend suggested he send an email to their old classmates, and Walker figured it was worth a shot; in his email, he wrote that he completely understood if no one felt comfortable being a donor, and he was happy to at least spread awareness regarding organ donation.

Ball responded within 15 minutes with his offer. Doctors told him they usually don't accept donors over 60, but because he's in good shape, it wouldn't be an issue, and after a battery of tests, it was determined he was a match. This week, Ball and Walker underwent surgery at George Washington University Hospital, with Walker — who called this an "example of humanity" — eternally grateful for the gift of life. "I'm giving him a piece of my body," Ball told WJLA. "It's simple enough. God gave me two, I don't have to wonder why." Catherine Garcia

1:40 a.m. ET

It took less than an hour from the Justice Department handing Congress former FBI Director James Comey's contemporaneous memos on his interactions with President Trump to The Associated Press and other news organizations starting to release excerpts of the memos, and then the entire 15-page unclassified version. This quick sharing of the documents would not have surprised Comey, apparently.

Before Congress obtained the memos, CNN's Jake Tapper asked Comey on Thursday if he thought the Justice Department was right to turn them over. "I don't know, because I don't know what considerations the department has taken into account — it's fine by me," he said. (In a letter accompany the memos, Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd said that after consulting "the relevant parties," the Justice Department had concluded that giving Congress the memos would not adversely affect any ongoing investigation.)

"I'm totally fine with transparency," Comey said. "I've tried to be transparent throughout this, and I think what folks will see, if they get to see the memos, is I've been consistent since the very beginning, right after my encounters with President Trump, and I'm consistent in the book and try to be transparent in the book as well."

In the CNN interview, Comey also said he "definitely" doesn't hate Trump or even dislike him but "there are things he does that make me uncomfortable and I think are inappropriate," and acknowledged he may be called as a witness if federal prosecutors decide to charge his former deputy, Andrew McCabe, for allegedly lying about talking to The Wall Street Journal about a Clinton Foundation investigation. You can watch the entire interview below. Peter Weber

12:57 a.m. ET

The Daily Show has launched a new segment, "A Series of Gunfortunate Events," to help viewers keep track of all the completely whack gun-related incidents taking place around the country.

Thursday night's edition included mentions of the Parkland teacher who left his loaded gun in a public restroom, where it was found by a man who then fired it, as well as a 23-year-old with a concealed carry permit who shot himself while grocery shopping. Trevor Noah saved the best for last, though, with the story of a police officer at a children's learning center.

The officer — who didn't lose his job — said a third grade student was able to grab his gun and fire it; the bullet went into the ground, and no one was hurt in the debacle. "A third-grader grabbed a police officer's gun, unholstered it, and fired it before the cop could stop him?" Noah said. "That cop needs to be disciplined and that child needs to be promoted." Watch the video below. Catherine Garcia

12:33 a.m. ET

On Wednesday, President Trump's former divorce attorney Jay Goldberg told The Wall Street Journal he believed federal prosecutors would flip Trump's lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen, and he elaborated on this concern on Thursday's evenings Out Front with Erin Burnett. Goldberg, a former federal prosecutor, explained that he believes Cohen might tell prosecutors things he thinks they want to hear about Trump, and maybe even wear a wire to generate incriminating evidence, to get lenient treatment, even though, he said, he believes Trump did not break the law.

Cohen is "of a type that I've recognized in the past as one not suited to stand up to the rigors of jail life," Goldberg said. He agreed with Burnett that Cohen is "of weak character," and he suggested that Cohen would be scared of sexual assault. "Prison has a racial overtone, and a person like Michael doesn't see himself walking down Broadway while people are clamoring, 'You're going to be my wife,'" Goldberg said.

Lawyer Michael Avenatti, who's suing Cohen and Trump, told Burnett he has "absolutely" no doubts that Cohen will flip "and I haven't had any doubts for weeks." Furthermore, he expressed confidence that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who is trying to ensure that the state can prosecute Cohen if Trump pardons him, is working with federal prosecutors to "leave a window open" for state charges. "Michael Cohen is going to be indicted, it is a near certainty," Avenatti said, "and it is a near certainty that he is going to roll over on the president."

On Wednesday morning, John Avlon expressed doubt that Cohen would flip, telling CNN's Chris Cuomo and Alisyn Camerota that "everything we know about Cohen shows that, I mean, his loyalty to Trump takes on the level of religion. I mean it is a deep and personal and definitional thing for him." Watch below. Peter Weber

April 19, 2018
Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Syrian-born German national linked to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks was captured more than a month ago by U.S.-backed forces in Syria, the Pentagon announced Thursday.

Spokesman Eric Pahon said that Mohammad Haydar Zammar was apprehended by members of the Syrian Democratic Forces as they continue their fight against the Islamic State. In the 9/11 Commission report, Zammar was described as an "outspoken, flamboyant Islamist" who enthusiastically praised "the virtues of violent jihad." He also reportedly said he influenced Mohammed Atta, one of the hijackers, and Ramzi Binalshibh, who is accused of assisting the hijackers and al Qaeda operatives. Catherine Garcia

April 19, 2018
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

On Thursday, the Justice Department sent Congress redacted, unclassified memos written by former FBI Director James Comey detailing private conversations he had with President Trump. The Republican chairmen of the House Judiciary, Intelligence, and Oversight and Government Reform committees had requested and threatened to issue a subpoena for the memos.

The Associated Press almost immediately obtained copies of the memos, which don't reveal much that hasn't already been told by Comey in either his congressional testimony last year or his new book, A Higher Loyalty. In a letter to the chairmen, Assistant Attorney General Stephen E. Boyd said that the Justice Department has concluded that releasing the memos will not "adversely impact any ongoing investigation or other confidentiality interests of the executive branch."

In one memo, Comey said Trump confided he had major concerns about former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's judgment, and a few days later, then-White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asked if Flynn's communications were being monitored under a secret surveillance warrant. In another, Comey wrote that Trump said he was told by Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country has "some of the most beautiful hookers in the world."

Late Thursday, the three chairmen released a joint statement that criticizes Comey and claims his memos show that Trump "wanted allegations of collusion, coordination, and conspiracy between his campaign and Russia fully investigated." Catherine Garcia

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