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March 1, 2014
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President Barack Obama's national security team met today following Russia's decision to send troops into Ukraine. Obama did not attend the meeting, but he spoke by phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Voicing "deep concern over Russia's clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty," Obama called for Russia to withdraw from Crimea immediately. Meanwhile, Secretary of State John Kerry got on the phone with acting Ukrainian President Oleksander Turchynov.

White House officials said the U.S. is currently focused on diplomatic options, but even those got off to a shaky start, when a U.N. Security Council meeting scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday was delayed because diplomats could not agree as to whether the discussions should be held privately or made open to the public.

Russian ambassador Vitaly Churkin said "certain countries" wanted the meetings held publicly, while he had opted for a closed-door session; those countries, which other diplomats said included the U.S., Britain, and France, eventually won out. Where those U.N. talks can go is somewhat limited, though, because as a permanent member, Russia has the option of vetoing any council resolution. Sarah Eberspacher

2:36 a.m. ET

Martin Shkreli, the widely despised former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, infamous for raising the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent, was called to testify before Congress last week. But instead of answering questions, Seth Meyers said on Tuesday's Late Night, "he spent the time doing what he does best: looking like a real slappable prick." Meyers illustrated his point with some footage of Shkreli invoking his Fifth Amendment right instead of answering even the most mundane questions.

As fun as it is to make fun of Shkreli, though, he's "not alone," Meyers said. "He's just doing what a lot of pharmaceutical companies already do, except he's being loud and conniving about it while they're being secretive and conniving about it." In fact, Shkreli is "just a convenient, deserving scapegoat" for the price-gouging of Americans by the drug industry, Meyers said, aided by Congress' decision to prevent the U.S. government from negotiating the price of drugs, like almost every other country does. Case in point, a company called Valeant bought two heart drug just last year and immediately raised the price 525 percent and 212 percent, Meyers said, but "Valeant didn't cause nearly as much outrage as Shkreli did because they don't have a smug, irritating face; they have a soothing logo." Watch Meyers' "closer look" at Shkreli and the unsavory behavior he exposed below. Peter Weber

2:08 a.m. ET

It was just his second time outside, but Bei Bei was ready for an adventure. On Monday, the panda cub born last summer at the Smithsonian's National Zoo climbed a tree for the first time, but was hesitant when it came time to climb back down. Luckily, his doting mother, Mei Xiang, was there to gently give him some assistance. Watch the sweet video below. Catherine Garcia

1:47 a.m. ET
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Jim Gilmore has a theory as to why he's virtually unknown among the Republican presidential candidates.

"I entered the race having been out of office for a considerable amount of time," he told USA Today. "I wasn't a sitting governor, my father wasn't president, and my brother wasn't president." Gilmore, the former governor of Virginia, was upbeat at his primary party in New Hampshire on Tuesday, attended by less than a dozen people. "I don't think we'll win this thing," he told one supporter, "but let's see if we can get some recognition."

With 88 percent of precincts reporting, Gilmore received 125 votes, or 0.0 percent. It was, however, a major victory compared to how he did in Iowa, where he was backed by just 12 caucusgoers, and Gilmore said he's looking forward to campaigning in South Carolina on Wednesday. New Hampshire state senator Sam Cataldo told USA Today Gilmore has a "hell of a background," but is practically invsible because "the media keeps playing Trump, Trump, and Trump. There's more to life than just Trump." Catherine Garcia

1:22 a.m. ET
Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

On Monday, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg confirmed that he's considering an independent run for president this year, telling the Financial Times that he finds "the level of discourse and discussion distressingly banal and an outrage and an insult to the voters." He'll decide soon, he said, and is "listening to what candidates are saying and what the primary voters appear to be doing." That's widely considered code for Bloomberg waiting to see if Donald Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) are likely to win the Republican and Democratic nominations, respectively.

Both Trump and Sanders notched solid victories in New Hampshire on Tuesday night. And a potential Trump-Sanders race is "a dream scenario for those — most notably Bloomberg himself — who dream of a real chance for the former mayor," says Chris Cillizza at The Washington Post. "I wouldn't fall down dead if later this week 'a Bloomberg insider' leaked either polling numbers or some sort of internal memo designed to stoke the fires for the former mayor’s independent bid." Since a Bloomberg run would probably ensure a Republican win in 2016, maybe this should be scored as two wins for Trump. Peter Weber

1:16 a.m. ET
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CNN and The New York Times are projecting Bernie Sanders as the winner of the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. With 89 percent of 300 precincts reporting, Sanders is leading Hillary Clinton 60 percent to 38.4 percent, with 138,414 votes to Clinton's 88,623. Catherine Garcia

1:15 a.m. ET
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Both CNN and The New York Times have called Donald Trump the winner of the New Hampshire primary, where he holds 35.1 percent of the vote with 88 percent of precincts reporting. Giving his first victory speech of the election, Trump vowed "to make America so great again. Maybe greater than ever before."

A number of news organizations have called John Kasich the second place winner with 15.9 percent. Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush, and Marco Rubio are locked in a battle for third place, virtually tied between 11 and 10 percent. Jeva Lange

1:10 a.m. ET
Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

FBI director James B. Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday that bureau technicians have been unable to unlock encrypted data on a cellphone that belonged to Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik, the shooters who killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California, on Dec. 2.

The locked data could help explain why the shooters left a bag with pipe bombs inside the conference room at the Inland Regional Center, whether they planned any additional attacks, or if anyone else knew about their plan beforehand, the Los Angeles Times reports. Comey said that encrypted cellphones and text messaging apps make it difficult for investigators to trace locations or track active plots after they have a suspect's phone. Encryption algorithms scramble the data once a PIN code is set, and many companies say they don't have the capability to unscramble the memory, arguing such capacity would weaken security and privacy, the Times says.

The FBI did not disclose the model of the phone, nor if it belonged to Malik or Farook. The bureau also says there is no evidence that the married couple had any outside help or instructions on how to carry out the attack. Farook became self-radicalized, and the pair pledged allegiance to ISIS the day of the shooting. Catherine Garcia

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