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June 15, 2013

A high school senior in Washington state was denied entry to her prom because her breasts are too big. Central Kitsap High School's dress code permits strapless dresses, but Brittany Minder says school officials told her she couldn't enter unless she covered her abundant cleavage. Minder wrapped herself in a shawl, but left the prom after an hour. "It was tough being there after all that happened," she said. "I was self-conscious." Samantha Rollins

11:05 p.m. ET
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With 35 percent of precincts reporting their results, Republican Greg Gianforte has a slight lead over Democrat Rob Quist in Thursday's special election in Montana for the House seat vacated by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

Gianforte has 112,498 votes compared to Quist's 101,620, while Libertarian Mark Wicks has 12,963 votes. Gianforte, a millionaire businessman, was charged with assault Wednesday night after an altercation with The Guardian's Ben Jacobs, who said Gianforte "body slammed" him and broke his glasses. Gianforte's campaign released a statement claiming Jacobs "grabbed Greg's wrist, and spun away from Greg, pushing them both to the ground." Catherine Garcia

10:33 p.m. ET
Facebook/Wayzata Public Schools

With multiple generations of her family looking on, Esther Begam, 88, collected her high school diploma, decades after she was denied an education by the Nazis.

Begam grew up in Poland, and when she was 11 years old, she had to quit school and move into a Jewish ghetto. Later, she was sent to a forced labor camp. Her father, a rabbi, was a chaplain in the Polish army, and was never heard from again. Begam lost her mother and brother at Auschwitz, and her older sister and every other member of her extended family at other camps. She fell in love with another Holocaust survivor, and after marrying at 17, they moved to Minnesota and started a new life together.

Seven years ago, Begam shared her story with Candice Ledman's English class at Wayzata High School in Plymouth. A student asked Begam what her biggest regret was, and her answer surprised Ledman. "I expected her to say I wish we would have run, I wish we would have hidden, I wish we would have saved pictures — and she said, 'The one thing I regret is not getting my high school diploma,'" Ledman told KARE-TV. Ledman wanted to do something about this, and when new principal Scott Gengler arrived on campus, he loved the idea of giving Begam an honorary diploma. "It's 71 years overdue," he said. This month, Ledman's class set up a ceremony just for Begam, complete with a special cake and her own cap and gown. In front of proud family, friends, and students, Ledman accepted her diploma. "It's wonderful," she said. Catherine Garcia

9:09 p.m. ET
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If forecasters are correct and there are warmer-than-average waters in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea and weak El Niño conditions this summer, the 2017 hurricane season could be an active one.

"There's a potential for a lot of Atlantic storm activity this year," acting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator Ben Friedman told The Associated Press Thursday. NOAA's forecast calls for 11 to 17 named storms and five to nine hurricanes, with two to four expected to be major; the long-term season averages 12 named storms and six hurricanes, with three major ones. Tropical storms are classified as having sustained winds of at least 39 mph, while hurricanes have sustained winds of at least 74 mph. The Atlantic storm seasons lasts six months, and will officially start on June 1.

Friedman told AP a new weather satellite that will move into a permanent position over the East Coast later this year will give forecasters a better view of the continental U.S. and tropical waters where hurricanes form. They will be able to watch storms as they develop and "see lightning in the clouds like we've never seen before," Friedman said. Catherine Garcia

8:03 p.m. ET
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After the FBI rejected a request by Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, for documents having to do with former FBI Director James Comey and his dealings with the White House, Chaffetz is giving the bureau a new deadline to get him the material.

"Congress does not conduct criminal or counterintelligence investigations; rather Congress' power of inquiry is rooted in part in its duty to oversee the executive branch's faithful enforcement of the laws that Congress enacted," Chaffetz wrote in a letter to acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe. "In this case, the focus of the committee's investigation is the independence of the FBI, including conversations between the president and Comey and the process by which Comey was removed from his role as director." Chaffetz and the committee's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings (Md.), asked for the records last week, setting a May 24 deadline.

That deadline came and went, and on Thursday, the assistant director for the FBI's Office of Congressional Affairs, Gregory Brower, wrote Chaffetz that the bureau would not be handing over the documents due to the appointment last week of former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel. In his letter to McCabe, Chaffetz said that the appointment of a special counsel does not interfere with congressional investigations into Russia meddling in the 2016 presidential election, The Hill reports. In this second request, Chaffetz is asking for "documents that are outside the scope of the special counsel's investigation," going back to Sept. 4, 2013. Catherine Garcia

7:16 p.m. ET
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President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, is under scrutiny by the FBI in its Russia investigation, several U.S. officials told NBC News and other media outlets.

Officials said investigators believe Kushner has information that could be helpful in the inquiry, but he isn't necessarily suspected of any crimes and is in a different category than Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign manager, and Michael Flynn, Trump's former national security adviser, who are considered subjects of the investigation.

In 2016, Kushner met at least once with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak and a Russian banker named Sergey Gorkov who has been under U.S. sanctions since 2014. It's unclear if Kushner has received any requests from federal investigators for documents, and his lawyer, Jamie Gorelick, told NBC News he "previously volunteered to share with Congress what he knows about these meetings. He will do the same if he is contacted in connection with any other inquiry." The investigation into whether Trump associates colluded with Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election is now being led by a special counsel, former FBI Director Robert Mueller. Catherine Garcia

6:39 p.m. ET
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British police are once again sharing intelligence information with the United States, following a suspension announced Thursday morning in the wake of several leaks about the Manchester bombing by U.S. officials to the media.

Sensitive details that were revealed to reporters include the name of the suspected bomber and the type of backpack he carried; British officials had wanted to keep the bomber's identity a secret for at least 36 hours so as to not tip off any accomplices. Prime Minister Theresa May said Thursday she would "make clear to President Trump that intelligence shared between our security agencies must remain secure," and on Thursday night, Mark Rowley, the Metropolitan Police's assistant commissioner for specialist operations, said that after receiving "fresh assurances" from the U.S., the two countries were once against sharing material. Catherine Garcia

4:41 p.m. ET
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President Trump on Thursday attended a meeting with European Union leaders in Brussels, where he apparently decided to air his grievances over Germany's trade surplus with the U.S. "The Germans are evil, very evil," Trump reportedly complained in the meeting, attendees told German newspaper Der Spiegel. "Look at the millions of cars they sell in the U.S. We'll stop that."

Der Spiegel reported that EU Commission leader Jean-Claude Juncker disagreed with Trump, defending the merits of free trade for the global economy. New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman notes that depending on the translation, Trump may have been calling the Germans merely "very bad" and not "very evil."

European Council President Donald Tusk acknowledged earlier Thursday that there had been some notable differences of opinion between EU leadership and the U.S. government, including on matters of climate politics, trade, and most openly, Russian relations. "I am not 100 percent sure that we can say today ... that we have a common position, common opinion, about Russia," Tusk said.

Just getting Trump to actually attend the meeting with the EU was considered a success, however. Trump did not extend an invitation for EU leaders to visit the White House. Shivani Ishwar

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