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Only in America
July 5, 2012

Georgia police officer William Martinez, 31, had a fatal heart attack in 2009 while he and a male friend were having sex with a woman in a motel room. A jury has now awarded his widow $3 million because doctors should have warned Martinez, who had a heart condition, to avoid strenuous activity. "This man could have died running on the treadmill," said her lawyer. The Week Staff

FIFA Under Fire
12:47 p.m. ET
Valeriano Di Domenico/AFP/Getty Images

FIFA President Sepp Blatter continues to maintain his innocence in the ongoing FBI investigation of soccer's governing body. The U.S. Justice Department indicted 14 officials on charges of corruption in May.

But Blatter, who is expected to be replaced at FIFA's helm as early as December, is afraid to leave Switzerland for fear of being arrested, the Los Angeles Times reports Blatter told German newspaper Welt am Sonntag.

"Not because the Americans have anything concrete against me, but because it would cause a public stir," he said. "Until everything has been cleared up, I am not going to take the risk of traveling."

Blatter won't even attend Sunday night's Women's World Cup final in Vancouver, Canada. Julie Kliegman

we'll never be royals
12:17 p.m. ET

Britian's Princess Charlotte is being christened Sunday at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Eastern England. The outing is the first public one for Prince William and Kate Middleton's family since Charlotte's birth in May.

Ahead of the ceremony, the couple named five godparents for baby Charlotte, none of whom are royalty. Charlotte is fourth in line to the British throne. Julie Kliegman

ISIS
11:11 a.m. ET
Younis Al-Bayati/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S.-led coalition carried out a series of at least 16 airstrikes on ISIS' base in eastern Raqqa, Syria, late Saturday and early Sunday. It was one of the largest operations of its kind against the terrorist group in the country, The Guardian reports.

The attacks reportedly killed at least 10 militants and harmed others. They also destroyed ISIS structures and transit routes, a U.S. military spokesman told The Guardian. He said the damage would hurt ISIS' ability to move from their de-facto capital. Julie Kliegman

our selfies, ourselves
10:39 a.m. ET
iStock

MasterCard is trying to cut down on fraud and appeal to young'uns. This fall, they're going to start experimenting with a new way to approve online payments — via selfie.

When checking out, rather than entering a password, users will be asked to hold their smartphone camera up to their faces and blink once, CNN reports. The blinking is designed to prevent a thief from simply stashing a selfie of you and uploading it to fool the system.

They'll have an Apple Pay-style fingerprint option as well for the curmudgeons of the world. Julie Kliegman

prison escape
10:15 a.m. ET

Convicted murderer David Sweat was incarcerated at the Five Points Correctional Facility in Romulus, New York, after being released from the hospital, the New York Department of Corrections announced in a news release Sunday. Sweat was hospitalized in serious condition after authorities shot and captured him near the Canadian border a week ago.

Sweat was on the run with convict Richard Matt after they escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility on June 6. Matt was fatally shot by law enforcement officials a couple of days before Sweat's capture. Julie Kliegman

Packing heat
9:37 a.m. ET
Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Green Bay Packers tight end Andrew Quarless was arrested in Miami Beach on Saturday for discharging a gun in public. He reportedly fired two shots after arguing with a group of women near a parking garage, according to a police report obtained by the Miami New Times.

Quarless tried to hide outside a restaurant and stashed his gun in a potted plant.

"We are aware of the matter ... and are in the process of gathering more information," his team's statement read.

Quarless' arrest was the second team incident this week. On Thursday, the NFL suspended defensive end Datone Jones for violating substance abuse policy. Julie Kliegman

Immigration
9:23 a.m. ET
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

About 250 children at a Texas detention center were administered adult dosages of the hepatitis A vaccine, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials said. No adverse side effects have been reported, but the children are being monitored by healthcare professionals at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, the Los Angeles Times reports.

"Parents at the facility were advised and counseled by medical professionals about potential side effects, with services made available in multiple languages," ICE said in a statement. Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease that spreads to people who aren't vaccinated.

Activists and Democratic politicians have called on Homeland Security to close detention centers, which they say are not safe for children. Julie Kliegman

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