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June 28, 2012

Virginia lawmakers had to omit any reference to "climate change" and "sea-level rise" in funding a study of a growing flooding problem. Scientists say sea levels along the state's coast have risen more than a foot and are still rising. Republicans conceded that flooding is a growing problem, but said there could be no mention of "sea-level rise" because it's a "left-wing term." The Week Staff

11:46 a.m. ET

President Trump advocated bipartisanship while attacking his partisan opponents in a Fox & Friends interview Sunday. "One of the things that should be solved — but it probably won't be — is that Republicans and Democrats don't get together," Trump said. "And I'm open arms [to Democrats], but I don't see that happening."

Trump turned to the subject of the embattled GOP health-care bill currently under consideration in the Senate to expand on his point. "It would be so great if Democrats and Republicans could get together, wrap their arms around it, and come up with something that everybody's happy with. It's so easy," he continued. "But we won't get one Democrat vote, not one. And if it were the greatest bill ever proposed in mankind, we wouldn't get a vote."

From there Trump moved on to "the resistance," a name for the popular protest against his presidency. "That's a terrible word. Think of it: Their theme is 'resist.' Their theme should be, 'Let's get together. Envelop,'" Trump said. Apparently remembering the belligerent tone of his own campaign, he conceded "resist" is a good theme for winning an election, but maintained it is "terrible" for right now.

Trump also addressed The Washington Post's Friday article detailing former President Obama's inaction in response to Russian election interference in 2016. "The question is, if [Obama] had the information, why didn't he do something about it?" Trump asked. He suggested the media is suppressing the story while actively referencing the Post report.

Watch Trump's comments in context below. Bonnie Kristian

10:01 a.m. ET
Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

A black St. Louis, Missouri, police officer was shot by a colleague while off duty this week, an encounter in which the injured officer's lawyer says race was a factor. "In the police report you have so far, there is no description of a threat [the shooter] received," said attorney Rufus J. Tate Jr. in a local news interview. "So we have a real problem with that. But this has been a national discussion for the past two years. There is this perception that a black man is automatically feared."

The off-duty officer was at home when he heard commotion outside and took his police-issued firearm to investigate. When two cops pursuing a suspect saw him, they "ordered him to the ground." He complied, and was recognized by his coworkers, who told him "to stand up and walk toward them."

At that moment, a fourth officer arrived. "[F]earing for his safety and apparently not recognizing the off-duty officer," the police report says, he immediately shot the off-duty cop in the arm.

All officers involved have been placed on administrative leave while the departmental investigation proceeds. The officer who was shot was released from the hospital after treatment. Bonnie Kristian

9:51 a.m. ET
SS Mirza/Getty Images

An oil tanker overturned and exploded in Pakistan Sunday, killing 153 people and leaving dozens more injured, including around 50 in critical condition. About 20 children are among the dead.

The truck tipped over on a highway after it blew out a tire, local officials said. A crowd gathered to collect the spilling fuel, putting them close to the truck when it exploded nearly an hour later.

"I have never seen anything like it in my life. Victims trapped in the fireball. They were screaming for help," said Abdul Malik, a police officer involved in rescue efforts. "We saw bodies everywhere, so many were just skeletons. The people who were alive were in really bad shape." Bonnie Kristian

9:45 a.m. ET

No less than 18 large wildfires are burning in the West and Southwest regions of the U.S., aggravated by extreme heat and lack of rain. The two largest blazes are in Utah and Arizona, but there are also fires in California, New Mexico, Nevada, and Oregon.

Wildfires have burned more than 2.5 million acres in the United States in 2017 alone, about 1 million acres more than is typical for this time of year. In Utah, 800 people have been evacuated, and 13 homes have burned. That fire began June 17 and is only 5 percent contained. Bonnie Kristian

8:29 a.m. ET
Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

The health-care proposal to replace ObamaCare expected to come to a vote in the Senate this week is insufficiently conservative, said Tim Phillips, president of Americans For Prosperity, a political outfit in the Koch brothers' network, in an Associated Press report published Sunday.

Phillips said the Koch network is "disappointed that movement has not been more dramatic toward a full repeal or a broader rollback of this law, ObamaCare," labeling the Senate bill "a slight nip and tuck" of current law which changes so little it is "immoral." To net his support, he added, the "Senate bill needs to get better."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has indicated he is willing to alter the health-care legislation to make it viable, but he faces incompatible demands from across the political spectrum. Bonnie Kristian

8:10 a.m. ET
Pool/Getty Images

Conservative Republican opponents of the GOP's health-care proposal in the Senate have labeled the ObamaCare replacement package "ObamaCare lite," but the bill is taking fire from the center and left, too.

A group of moderate Republican senators are raising concerns about proposed Medicaid changes that would mean significantly less federal funding in their states. The fifth Republican senator to announce his opposition to the bill, Nevada's Dean Heller, specifically cited Medicaid in his Friday announcement that his vote is currently a "no." Sens. Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.) and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) have not formally opposed the legislation so far, but both centrist Republicans have mentioned similar considerations.

Meanwhile, progressive critics warn the legislation could produce a "death spiral" in insurance markets in which premiums rise as healthier people — no longer bound by ObamaCare's individual mandate — drop coverage, producing a cycle of even higher premiums and fewer insurance customers.

President Trump fired back at critics twice on Twitter Saturday, noting premium hikes under the current system and writing that he "cannot imagine that these very fine Republican Senators would allow the American people to suffer a broken ObamaCare any longer!" The health-care bill can't pass the Senate if more than two Republicans vote against it. Bonnie Kristian

June 24, 2017
Leon Neal/Getty Images

The U.K.'s Houses of Parliament were hit with a cyberattack Friday evening consisting of "unauthorized attempts to access parliamentary user accounts," a representative of Parliament said Saturday. Members of Parliament were informed of the situation Friday night when they had difficulty accessing their email accounts remotely.

"We are continuing to investigate this incident and take further measures to secure the computer network," the representative said. "We have systems in place to protect member and staff accounts and are taking the necessary steps to protect our systems."

It is unclear how many MPs were affected or who is responsible for the attack. Bonnie Kristian

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