T-shirt opinions
February 22, 2012

One symptom of "Linsanity": The urge to turn Jeremy Lin's name into a pun — for better or worse. While the breakout New York Knicks point guard has inspired harmless phrases like "Lin and Bear It!" or "Linstant Replay," wordplay referencing Lin's Asian heritage has ruffled feathers. The New York Post caught flack for a cover that read, "Amasian!" while an ESPN writer was fired for his "Chink in the Armor" headline. More proof of heedless political incorrectness: This "Lincredible Sensasian!" tee ($24) — two puns for the price of one. The Week Staff

This just in
9:53 p.m. ET

Police in Garland, Texas, say officers shot and killed two men Sunday afternoon after they pulled up to a building and shot a Garland Independent School District officer.

The incident took place outside the Curtis Culwell Center, which is hosting the Muhammad Art Exhibit and Contest, a controversial event organized by the American Freedom Defense Initiative featuring cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, NBC 5 reports. The group said it held the event to take a stand against intimidation by violence. People inside the center were taken by Garland SWAT to a nearby high school, and businesses in the vicinity were evacuated. Police also searched vehicles in the center's parking lot, looking for explosives.

Police said that there was a heavy law enforcement presence already at the event, with organizers spending almost $10,000 on extra security. The officer who was shot was taken to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries. Catherine Garcia

protests
9:35 p.m. ET

In Tel Aviv on Sunday, thousands of people participated in a march against racism and police brutality, clashing with police on horseback by nightfall.

A majority of the demonstrators were from Israel's Jewish Ethiopian minority, and during the day the protest was mostly peaceful. Things took a turn when police arrived at Rabin Square and used water cannons and smoke in an attempt to get the demonstrators to leave, CNN reports. At least 57 officers and 12 protesters were injured, Israeli police said, and 43 protesters were arrested.

The Ethiopian community in Israel became outraged last week when footage was released showing an Ethiopian Israeli wearing an army uniform being beaten by police officers. Catherine Garcia

nepal earthquake
2:44 p.m. ET

A rescue team has saved a 101-year-old man who was buried alive after last week's devastating earthquake in Nepal.

The official death toll from the quake is more than 7,000, but Nepal's government said Sunday the toll is likely to climb "much higher," AFP reports. But in a bit of good news, 101-year-old Funchu Tamang wasn't one of the casualties.

Rescuers found Tamang buried in the collapsed remains of his home in Nuwakot's Kimtang village on Saturday. He was taken to a local hospital, where his condition was pronounced stable. Tamang suffered only minor injuries, according to AFP.

Officials also rescued three female survivors from rubble in the district of Sindhupalchowk on Sunday, but it is unclear how long they were buried. —Meghan DeMaria

2016 Watch
2:32 p.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) wants to be the change.

In an interview with ABC's This Week on Sunday, Sanders told host George Stephanopoulos (and viewers), "Don't underestimate me." He knows that most people don't think he'll win the 2016 presidential election, and he wants to alter that mindset.

"We need a political revolution in this country, and I want to lead that effort," Sanders said. He cited his successful bids to become mayor of Burlington, Vermont, as well as being elected to the U.S. House and to the Senate, as examples of his political victories.

Sanders, an independent socialist, is after the Democratic presidential nomination, though many believe he won't defeat Hillary Clinton. "I respect her, and I like her, but... maybe it's a time for a real political shake-up in this country," Sanders said of Clinton.

In the interview, Sanders also praised Norway, Denmark, and Sweden for their democratic socialism, which he said better serve average citizens than the U.S. government does. He cited free college and free health care as examples. "The fact of the matter is, we do a lot in our country, which is good," Sanders said. "But we can learn from other countries." Meghan DeMaria

Baltimore
1:52 p.m. ET
Alex Wong/Getty Images

When NBC's Meet the Press host Chuck Todd asked House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) if he agreed that America is "in a national crisis when it comes to the relationship between African-Americans and law enforcement," Boehner responded, "I do."

"I think that if you look at what's happened over the course of the last year, you've just got to scratch your head," Boehner said. He also addressed the death of Freddie Gray, who died while in police custody in Baltimore, saying that "public servants should not violate the law."

Referencing the charges against the six Baltimore police officers involved in Gray's death, Boehner said that "if these charges are true, it's outrageous, and it's unacceptable." Meghan DeMaria

Discoveries
1:47 p.m. ET

One Finnish shipwreck is the discovery that keeps on giving.

A team of underwater archaeologists in Finland has discovered a shipwreck that dates to the 15th century, and it's full of treasure. The team believes the find is the wreck of the Hanneke Wromen, a ship that sank on November 20, 1468, with 200 passengers and crew members on board. The ship was en route from Germany to Estonia when it was lost during a storm.

According to historic records, the ship was carrying 10,000 gold coins when it sank. Historians believe the treasure would be worth 50 million Euros (about $56 million) today. The team had been searching for the shipwreck since last year.

Finland's National Board of Antiquities has authorized further investigations into the shipwreck, and the team hopes that they will retrieve the gold coins. Researchers will also date wood from the shipwreck to confirm that it is, indeed, from the Hanneke Wromen. Meghan DeMaria

Baltimore
1:12 p.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

On NBC's Meet the Press Sunday, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) said that the recent events in Baltimore underscore America's need to focus on "economic marginalization," Politico reports.

"We haven't had an agenda for American cities probably since at least Jimmy Carter,” O'Malley said to Meet the Press host Chuck Todd. "We have left cities to fend for themselves."

O'Malley also argued against House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio)'s suggestion that liberals' poverty solutions have failed over the last 50 years. O'Malley pointed to the decrease in violent crime in Baltimore, as well as lower incarceration rates, saying that Freddie Gray's death and the following riots have been "a heartbreaking setback for an otherwise remarkable comeback."

O'Malley hasn't made any official statements about a Democratic presidential campaign, but he said that if he does announce his candidacy later this month, he "wouldn't think of announcing any place else" than in Baltimore. Meghan DeMaria

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